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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if there is a solution for this or not, but here goes. As an example.

We were in petsmart a few weeks ago, our dog is leashed as expected - standing in a lineup. Jagger is cool with all the meet and greet of other dogs, kids and adults. However, large black lab decides to try to use Jagger as a chew toy - I understand the Lab isn't being mean or aggressive, just very aggressive play. But the Lab's owner talks to me like he expects me to allow it. His dog isn't going to hurt my dog, it's just carrying on. There's only 50 pounds difference in the dogs. Given that there's a dozen other dogs around doesn't help either.

Jagger in these situations will stand his ground and let dogs know simply that he isn't willing to play like this - give a few warning growls, 99% of dogs get the point that he's not a pushover and back down. I can't blame the Lab in this situation, it's the owner with the issue. I don't like the scenarios where I have to rescue the dog and remove him from a situation - but given the place, there is no choice. One of the groomers watched the entire thing and came over to talk to me about it, she agreed it was the right thing to do, she didn't like the idea of having to remove the dog either. I had to wait until the owner left the store to make my purchase.

How would you deal with an owner like this? Just remove the dog? Try to get through to the owner? Is there a magic bullet for stuff like this - some quick fix to get through?
 

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I would just tell the owner that it's not an appropriate time or place for play-time between the 2 dogs. If they protest, I make it very clear and as blunt as possible that they have to get their dog away from mine now. I have no patience for bull**** from other people and what they think their dog should be doing when my own dog is part of the scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll have to change my way of thinking and try it that way.

First instinct for me is to remove my dog from the scenario - and I really don't want to reinforce that negative behavior with this little guy.
 

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I don't like to be confrontational but sometimes we need to be to keep things around us tolerable. If a dog is bothering mine, and my dog is trying to keep cool, then I have absolutely no qualm with letting the other owner know that they have to step in and remove their dog. It would be the same if it were my dog that was being a nuisance, I would leave instead of letting him be a pest to other dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm always having to watch dogs, and their approach with mine. Yesterday at the dog park, another problematic owner. Pit bull cross - don't get me wrong, I love pitties, have a soft spot for them - but this one came by in a narrow area of the trail, head low and intense eyes. I knew right away she was going to make a go for Jagger. I don't think he seen her coming.

A few feet away, she let out the growl and I managed to grab her collar before she got to him. Her owner was shocked, offended that I grabbed her dog. I didn't hurt the dog, just grabbed her collar and veered her away. Had a little discussion with that owner, she wasn't pleased.
 

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I find it impossible to control other dog owners, I'm with "remove the dog". Do what's best for your dog in the situation. If you think the dog owner will listen and obey in a timely manner, sure, talk to them. At my age, I wouldn't bother, been there, done that, been yelled at, laughed at, lectured, ignored--I walk away now.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do what's best for your dog in the situation.
And that's what I'm trying to get through my own head, given the situation. Yesterday, he could have been hurt in a hurry. I should have leashed him and followed the dog owner from a distance just to see if Jagger was a target or if all dogs were.
 

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When people try to let their dogs run up to mine, I put my dog(s) on the other side of me and direct them verbally to "let him/her be", loudly enough for the other owner to hear (this is primarily for the other owner, though my dogs have heard it enough that they may know it!). If their dog approaches anyway, I block the dog and tell them my dog doesn't like other dogs. My dogs know the drill, and usually just wait while I deal with it. If the dog can't be deterred and the owner can't be reasoned with, I put more space between us.

I don't really let my dogs "meet and greet" with strange dogs much, for multiple reasons.

One, none of the dogs that I've had (other than Roxie, who's not mine, but goes with me a lot- she's usually fine with most dogs) is the type to ignore pushy behavior from another dog, and I can't predict with any certainty which dogs may exhibit that behavior while interacting with my dogs. Previous dogs were big enough that if they took a dog's pushy behavior as a challenge to fight, I was looking at a vet bill to repair someone else's dog. Current dogs are small enough that if another dog gets too pushy and/or they start a fight, I'll be paying to get MY dog put back together. Either way, it's always been lose/lose for me in that aspect, lol.

Also, I see lots of dogs that are allowed to meet every dog in the name of "socialization", and many of them are 1000% more reactive than my dog, because they are so conditioned to meet other dogs that they can't accept NOT meeting if the other dog isn't amenable to it. They lunge, bark, scream and chortle, all because they've never been taught that not every dog is there for them to meet. Meanwhile, my dogs who assume that they should ignore a dog unless directed otherwise, are perfectly content either way.

Don't get me wrong, all of my dogs but one (of 4) have been fine out in public with other dogs within feet, and 2 of those have had "dog friends" that we go places and do stuff with, but they don't need to meet every dog they see. They live in a house with 2 other dogs, and we have family/friends with 3 other dogs that they regularly interact with- that's enough. I do occasionally let dogs that are overflowing with "dog friendliness" meet Bus (who is fairly dog friendly, but can be too much for some dogs, and is a member of the "fun police" force) briefly, but never let them roughhouse, as that can get too rough even with his housemates and IME dogs that don't know each other well are more likely to get carried away and end up in a brawl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for your input busannie...

He's confident enough that he can handle say 99% of dogs. His back is like a thermometer for his defensiveness - it's a rarity but when he's gone full ridgeback, teeth bared, snarling and stamping the ground, he's saying "I'm not scared of you, I mean business", back off or else. I should get it on video one day, it's pretty impressive - and most dogs adopt the "not worth it" attitude and back off. One boxer decided to test his resolve, 3 warnings from Jagger then he bit. Owner was ok with it, his dog needed the lesson.

The vast majority of dogs, and there's probably thousands over the last few years of running the different parks, have been awesome. Some come in fast and I'm sure they have "Oh look, a chew toy" on their minds - it's not aggressive, but they want to play aggressive.

Usually one dog a year comes in with the dangerous attitude, head low, intense eyes locked onto Jagger as prey and I know they mean business - that's where I'm stepping in - and that's the owners I'm having issue with.
 

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That's certainly an option with dogs that display a normal range of threat behavior prior to actually biting another dog, but the problem is that BOTH dogs have to have that trait, or things can get hairy. Where you could get in trouble would be if someone lets their dog charge up, your dog hackles and snarls or snaps at them, and they escalate it into an all out brawl, and if it's bigger dog vs little dog, your dog will lose that one every time when push comes to shove. I know a fair number of dogs that don't take corrections from other dogs well, and may retaliate. That is why I don't leave it up to any of my dogs to deter strange dogs. Plus, I don't particularly want them practicing higher level threat behaviors, I've had a couple legitimately dog aggressive dogs who didn't "do" warnings, just bit other dogs, so I have a healthy appreciation for the longer fuse that my more social dogs have. Why risk a bad experience when it's so easy to prevent most conflicts? Any dog that is likely to prompt a negative reaction from my dogs gets turned away "at the door", so to speak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One of the universal truths to Miniature Pinschers is their fearlessness, mentally tough. These dogs raised properly are not aggressive, he doesn't snap at other dogs nor does he go looking for fights. I wanted a confident dog, he was raised that way, given the respect he needs to be a dog, given the love for hunting etc. We all take chances when in a public dog park, it is what it is. We hope that the dogs get along and all is good - so far so good. I could get knifed or shot in the streets tomorrow - one will hope it doesn't happen but I'm not going to live in fear of possibilities.

We ran into an issue with a female pitty, he pulled dominant on her and got knocked down a few pegs in a hurry - I didn't see it coming. She could have killed him in a heartbeat, but she didn't open her mouth, all that was hurt was his pride. I'm ok with that, the pitty's owner was near in tears but it was Jaggers fault. Dogs learn from other dogs, sometimes it's the hard way.

When we add another dog to the family, it'll probably be another minpin, it will be raised the same way, Jagger is a good teacher. Or a dachshund, the good ol badger dog. It will be raised the same way, it will be fearless and it will hunt as well, not badgers but...
 

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I don't think the size matters. You'll find rude dogs and irresponsible owner in every size.
If I go into shop with him, my dog should stay at my side and ignore every other dog. I wan't to buy stuff not pluck little dogs from my legs.
You never know if the other dog is friendly and even small dogs can deal permanent damage to humans and other dogs alike.

I generally would be extremely careful with strange dogs that are very different in size though.
if i don't know them I wouldn't let themhave direct contact.
even if the big dog is friendly, a chihuahua can easily die when it is hit by a sofa cushion, they can be so easily hurt.
there are also dogs that see a "correction" of another dog as an official invitation to join the fight. this can be pretty dangerous.

I also think it is really disrespectful of the other owner to tell you what to do with your dog.
it's your job to make sure your pet is safe and if you feel he's not safe with the other dog, it is your resposibility to end the situation.
he should respect your choice.

the small Pinschers and Schnauzers, similiar to the Rattler, the Ratonero and certain small Terrier breeds, are bred to hunt small vermins...rats are intelligent and they can be pretty vicious, so the dogs had to be courageous and tenacious to fight them.
this sometimes, even though they're intelligent, can make them a bit reckless. As an owner we've got to take that into account and keep them from continuing a fight that they can't win.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Happened again yesterday, lab cross this time running beside a kid on a bike. Gf didn't see it coming. 50 feet away, dog slows down, head low, intense eyes locked on. Had to push the gf out of the way to block it.

Met a couple of Cane Corso's for the first time, what beautiful dogs.
 
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