Dog Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Every night when I take Cobber into my bedroom to crate him for bed, we pass the cats' room. Very often, he'll run in there and go straight to their dry food dish -- he absolutely LOVES the cats' Wellness grain-free adult cat kibble.

That got me wondering if his eating dry, grain-free, Wellness cat food is bad for him? :ponder:

I guess I don't quite understand why they can make a cat food that smells SO good to a dog, but they can't transfer that appeal to the dog kibble they make. If I take a handful of the cat kibble and mix it in with Cobber's puppy kibble, am I going to cause any health problems?

I'm just curious about this and couldn't really find any threads that addressed this question. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Why do you want to mix it with his food?
It probably wouldn't harm him in good measure, unless he is allergic to something in the cats food.
What kind of kibble does he eat?
IMO I would just stick to the dog eating dog food and the cat eating cat food. They are formulated differently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Why do you want to mix it with his food?
It probably wouldn't harm him in good measure, unless he is allergic to something in the cats food.
What kind of kibble does he eat?
IMO I would just stick to the dog eating dog food and the cat eating cat food. They are formulated differently.
Well, because he loves it so much. :eek: He's indifferent to his own food (Wellness Complete Health for Puppies) but LOVES the cats' kibble (Wellness Complete Health adult cat food). I was just wondering what the big difference is besides one is labeled cat food and one is labeled dog food. I don't mean to sound stupid, but I'd prefer to feed him food he actually enjoys eating, so I'm trying to figure out if there's some mega reason not to, that's all :) Is there some reason dogs shouldn't eat cat food?


Top ingredients from his current dog food:
Deboned Turkey, Chicken Meal, Oatmeal, Salmon Meal, Ground Barley, Ground Brown Rice, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Rye Flour, Tomato Pomace, Menhaden Fish Meal, Natural Chicken Flavor, Pea Fiber, Tomatoes, Salmon Oil, Ground Flaxseed, Carrots, Spinach, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Sweet Potatoes, Apples, Blueberries, Vitamins
Guaranteed AnalysisCrude ProteinNot Less Than28.00%Crude FatNot Less Than18.00%Crude FiberNot More Than4.00%MoistureNot More Than11.00%CalciumNot Less Than1.25%PhosphorusNot Less Than0.90%Vitamin ENot Less Than400 IU/kgAscorbic Acid (Vitamin C)*Not Less Than100 mg/kgOmega 6 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than4.00%Omega 3 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than0.60%Beta-Carotene*Not Less Than5 mg/kgDocosahexaenoic Acid (DHA)*Not Less Than0.13%Lycopene*Not Less Than0.25 mg/kgTaurine*Not Less Than0.09%


Top ingredients from the cat food:
Deboned Chicken, Chicken Meal, Rice, Ground Barley, Ground Rice, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Chicken Liver, Salmon Meal, Natural Chicken Flavor, Tomato Pomace, Cranberries, Cranberry Extract Powder, Cranberry Fiber, Chicory Root Extract, Ground Flaxseed, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Vitamins
Crude ProteinNot Less Than36.00%Crude FatNot Less Than17.00%Crude FiberNot More Than3.00%MoistureNot More Than11.00%AshNot More Than6.50%MagnesiumNot More Than0.12%Vitamin ANot Less Than5,000 IU/kgVitamin E Not Less Than300 IU/kgTaurineNot Less Than0.20%Omega 6 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than3.25%Omega 3 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than0.45%


Cranberries in the cat food is interesting, none in the dog food. And there's significant Vitamin A in the cat food that's not listed at all in the dog.... So I certainly see differences, but nothing that seems to scream out (to me) "don't ever feed this cat food to a dog"... But that's sort of why I'm asking here, because I really have no knowledge of canine nutritional needs vs. feline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Guaranteed AnalysisCrude ProteinNot Less Than28.00%Crude FatNot Less Than18.00%Crude FiberNot More Than4.00%MoistureNot More Than11.00%CalciumNot Less Than1.25%PhosphorusNot Less Than0.90%Vitamin ENot Less Than400 IU/kgAscorbic Acid (Vitamin C)*Not Less Than100 mg/kgOmega 6 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than4.00%Omega 3 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than0.60%Beta-Carotene*Not Less Than5 mg/kgDocosahexaenoic Acid (DHA)*Not Less Than0.13%Lycopene*Not Less Than0.25 mg/kgTaurine*Not Less Than0.09%



Crude ProteinNot Less Than36.00%Crude FatNot Less Than17.00%Crude FiberNot More Than3.00%MoistureNot More Than11.00%AshNot More Than6.50%MagnesiumNot More Than0.12%Vitamin ANot Less Than5,000 IU/kgVitamin E Not Less Than300 IU/kgTaurineNot Less Than0.20%Omega 6 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than3.25%Omega 3 Fatty Acids*Not Less Than0.45%
Well, not only are dogs and cats a completely different species with completely different dietary needs, but if you take a look at the ratio of protein to fat in each food, the answer is quite clear. Also take a look at the difference between vitamins, oils, and acids. They are just different and for very good reasons. Actually they are sooo different that you should probably talk to your vet instead of asking a forum.

dog food-protein to fat 28:18
cat food-protein to fat 36:17

Dog food is formulated for DOGS. Cat food is formulated for CATS

Like I said earlier in good measure it wouldn't have any effect. But if you fed your dog only cat food, you would drastically see it in its appearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
Cat food is typically higher in protein and fat. In my view, it's probably not a big issue of your dog is a puppy or generally very active and lean. And personally I tend to question the higher carbs in many commercial dog foods.

I highly doubt it would do any harm at all to feed a high quality cat food as a topper just to help your dog enjoy his food. I've done it myself, when I changed my cat's food and ended up with a bunch of kibble that was a great quality food - what, I'm supposed to just throw it away?

Anyway those are just my thoughts. Similar to you, the explanation that "dog food is formulated for dogs and cat food is formulated for cats" (uh, duh.... the question was 'does that matter') has never been a sufficient reason for me to worry about the dog eating some cat food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
<p>dog eating cat food is generally NOT a big deal. It is higher protein than is generally recommended for dogs, but as part of the mix, it should be fine. A dog will not suffer from malnutrition eating a decent cat food, however cats cannot subsist on dog food. They need taurine, which is not found in sufficient quantities in dog food. I use cat food as treats all the time. There is nothing inherently wrong with it.</p>
<p><font size="1"><i>Posted via Mobile Device</i></font></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
Maybe the wellness core would be better for the dog , look at the difference in protein in the two you posted. That might be why the dog prefers it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,625 Posts
A little bit is fine as long as his system is tolerating it. There are some nutritional differences, so its not something you'd want to do alot of especially in the long term, but a little bit isn't going to do any harm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,262 Posts
I agree with many others, as a topper (and only in small amounts!) it will be fine for him.
Maybe it would be easier to find a food that he is excited about though? Mine love to eat but they go crazy when they know they get raw food :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: HouseIsaZoo

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
My dogs eat cat-food regularly. Either when I need to give medicine, where I use cat-food to hide the smell or when I'm out of treats, I'll just grab some of my cats kibbles and use that. My dogs are still here and doing fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,356 Posts
Hugo loves the cat's food (a grain free hollistic). Like, it's one of his favorite things - ever. I use it to help get him to swallow tablets & having a small handful of cat food in my pocket helps me keep him focused to conduct a (somewhat) nice calm meeting when new people come over. He only gets a small amount & the high fat content of cat food (though this particular one has a good level) is certainly not something I need to worry about giving Hugo atm.

I think a cat food treat isn't ever going to do a dog harm unless they have a particular intolerance or allergy (& personally, I wouldn't buy a food for either Hugo or the cats that I know the other animals are allergic too, as there is a lot of sneaky food theft from both parties at times_
 
  • Like
Reactions: ruthcatrin

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
They tend to coat cat food in fat to make it more appealing to cats, which in turn makes it yummier for dogs as well. Cats need more fat in their diet than dogs, though. The other things that will be different are the vitamin and mineral amounts.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top