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I've just got an 8 week old Bedlington terrier puppy. We are crate training him, and at night he's really good as I keep the crate in my room.

However, if we put him in there during the day he's terrible. He won't stop crying unless he wears himself out :( I feel awful leaving him in there, but he's got to get used to being left alone. Any ideas?
 

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Hello, fellow East Anglian. :)

Okay, firstly, read other threads on crate training. :p
Secondly - think about why he's crying. Outrule all things he COULD be sad about; so make sure that he's not hungry, needing to pee or poop, thirsty, and that he's actually ready for a sleep. Pee and poop him before he goes in and even take him for a walk in your arms for socialising as that will wear him out.
He's not too young to be trained, either. I trained both mine to sit the first day they got here and basic obedience within the next week or two - so they can learn it, they just have low attention span. So don't be afraid to teach him to sit, or down, or leave it, etc. Just keep it in short bursts that will end happily, like in advert breaks.
Other ways to tire him out is a mind game such as a Kong. If you're leaving him in his crate, make sure there's something for him to nibble on before he naps so he associates it with a good place, too, so a Kong or a biscuit or a chew toy are good (chew toys frozen are nice on gums, as well as frozen carrots).

Remember that being near you is the main factor here, so pop your jumper in there with him and leave either the radio on or (if you're really a jammy dodger) a recording of your voice reading a story or something. Having his crate in a communal place instead of the bedroom during the day will help him accustom to noises and even having you sat next to him reading a book whilst he's in there will help. A towel over the crate can make it feel more 'den' like and the darkness will mean he's less likely to become stressed, too. :)
 

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Totally agree with Tulip's excellent and thorough advice. I won't repeat it all. Puppies want to be with you, so that's their main concern when crated. To the extent you can have pup's crate in the same room with you during the day, that might help. I've found with the pups we've raised that the most stressful thing for them is actually to be crated in a room you are not in, but they know you are in the house. For some reason, that seems to cause more frustration and anxst than being crated when you leave the house totally.

Eight weeks is still very young. He'll be better able to handle being alone in a few more weeks. Its OK to drag the crate from the bedroom, to the living room during the day. They even make crates with wheels now. :)

All I can add is the encouragement that this phase does not last forever! Read up on all the crate training threads. You'll get pup sorted out soon.

Best of luck and do let us know how you make out with the wee one. ;-)
 

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Something that worked for a breeder I know is to put a towel or blanket over the crate, and also not to run to the crate every time the puppy cries (this trains them to yell and cry for you)
What they do is wait for the crying to stop, then visit the crate, obviouslly they make sure the dog is looked after before he goes in.
If the dog is in for a few hours then let him out ever hour for exercise, but not when the dog is crying.
 

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You need to slowly introduce the dog to the crate. So start by sitting near the crate with treats and a clicker if you clicker train. When the pup looks at the crate, click (or give a soft "yes"), and treat. When he sniffs the crate, click/yes and treat. When he goes inside the crate whether it be to get a toy, maybe you throw a treat in there, etc and when he goes in click/yes and give a handful of treats (small handful of course since he is young ;) ). Then start feeding him in his crate.

During this time (once he has gotten good at looking at the crate or going in himself) start to close the door but dont walk away from him and click/yes and treat over and over and over. Then you can start adding distance, like take a step away from the crate, come back and click/yes treat. And on and on and on.

The main point is...click/yes and treat to show the dog the crate is a good thing!

Also you need to really go slow and take your time so as to set the pup up for success.
 

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I read this often...and I have to ask: If you have to start from day one, there's not a lot of time to get them introduced slowly us there, or...what am I missing? I did play with the crate with Nani her first night and morning home, but...I also needed to get her in there, so she wouldn't start to pee and poop all over the house! How...do you do both?

Happily, she doesn't cry much anymore when I put her into her crate, and I've had to do the opposite of many--she has to be in another room, but she can see me from there when she's not sleeping. Being with me made her struggle to get out of the crate too much.

But she's learning to stay longer and longer, and I think she's doing fine. I just did the best I could and I HOPE it's all going to be okay! We're up to 2 1/1 hours in the crate at a time now, after only a week and a half, so...cross fingers. A few accidents of course, but she "goes" as soon as she gets outside now, so that's progress...

You need to slowly introduce the dog to the crate.
 

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I read this often...and I have to ask: If you have to start from day one, there's not a lot of time to get them introduced slowly us there, or...what am I missing? I did play with the crate with Nani her first night and morning home, but...I also needed to get her in there, so she wouldn't start to pee and poop all over the house! How...do you do both?

Happily, she doesn't cry much anymore when I put her into her crate, and I've had to do the opposite of many--she has to be in another room, but she can see me from there when she's not sleeping. Being with me made her struggle to get out of the crate too much.

But she's learning to stay longer and longer, and I think she's doing fine. I just did the best I could and I HOPE it's all going to be okay! We're up to 2 1/1 hours in the crate at a time now, after only a week and a half, so...cross fingers. A few accidents of course, but she "goes" as soon as she gets outside now, so that's progress...
My experience with using a crate is this...
From day one pup is kept nearby, in the same room as I am in. That means at night too, pup is in crate right next to my bed. This means the crate is not a symbol of separation. So in that sense I've never had trouble with pup liking the crate. With water and toys available, and me in the same room, pup is not lonely. Of course the instant I leave the room pup usually cries, especially when he's young, so I try not to do that much until he's older. Now I don't think I use a crate in the way Paws describes. She is definitely the expert on helping a pup to truly love his crate.

As far as housetraining with a crate goes, here's what I always did. Pup is in the crate while in the room with me... ie safe on the pee/poo thing. Or pup is out confined to a small area of the room with me, while I'm totally attending to him, eyes glued. Or pup is outside with me going potty. That's pretty much the only 3 modes for a very young pup. You can also use a small pen once puppy is a bit older, he probably won't pee inside the small pen, as his sense of "not messing his home" gets to be larger.

Not sure this was much help to your question...?

As far as long term, our 14 month old still stays in her crate during the day while we are gone at work. With the system I have described, she has learned to like her crate and goes in willingly. We Always toss a treat in the crate and tell her "kennel" and she goes in just fine, and actually likes the peace and quiet. She's old enough now that she sleeps free in the house at night. The only reason we crate her during the day is just because she is still so playful that she might chew up the remote control, or a couch cushion, or something during the day. Probably we could stop crating her in the day soon, but we just got some new furniture so we have not wanted to take the risk yet!
 

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BEST answer I've seen yet! THANK you!
Glad to be of help. This stuff is difficult to figure out the first time through, especially with lots of advice that can seem contradictory. You almost have to feel your way along, trust your observations, trust your heart, don't be afraid to change tactics if you feel like what you are doing is not working. One thing I've learned over the 4 pups we've raised is that most problems happen because I'm doing something ineffective, not because pup is being "naughty"... if you know what I mean. In other words, if I create a clear pattern for pup, then things go well. Its very easy to confuse the puppy. They really don't understand human expectations very well at first.

Good luck! :)
 

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Again, I thank you. And some good news! I had repair men here today all day, and she went to her crate happily, even with all the chaos...and didn't cry when she heard my voice or when I walked by her door.

I guess we're getting there!
 

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Again, I thank you. And some good news! I had repair men here today all day, and she went to her crate happily, even with all the chaos...and didn't cry when she heard my voice or when I walked by her door.

I guess we're getting there!
That's awesome! It sounds like you are doing a terrific job. Things are going just fine! Give yourself a break. Sometimes just not being too worried/serious about these puppy stages is actually the best thing. Here's the thing with puppies... they grow up really fast! So most of the difficulties right now, will indeed pass in a matter of weeks/months. Seems like a long time while you are going through it, but before you know it, she'll be all grown up and puppyhood will be a distant memory. I just LOVE the puppy stage. If I could take care of 20 dogs, I'd raise a puppy every 6 months, but alas, we only have 2 laps in the house, so 2 dogs is our limit. :p
 
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