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I got a male Siberian husky on Tuesday who is 9 weeks old. I took Tuesday and Wednsday off to help him with the move however now I have to work. I took him out for an hour in the morning and played and ran around and made sure he went to potty after eating. He will be in his cage around 9 hours, I left his teething toy and another toy in the cage along with his bed. Also put a blanket over the cage. Any other tips to keep him happy/will he be ok in there. This only happens twice a week.
 

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9 hours is a long time for a 9 week old puppy to be alone in a crate. He'll need out for the bathroom throughout the day, do you have someone to come let him out? He should really be going out once every hour, 2 hours at a push.

I suggest you find someone to come let him out as this will help with toilet training.
 

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I also think that is to long for a pup that age. I would use a pen with a potty area or a small room that is puppy proofed. You don't want to teach your pup to go to the bathroom where he sleeps but you are not giving him a choice in a kennel. You need an area big enough to have a bed area and a potty area away from the bed and water dish.
 

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Again, entirely too long for a dog that age. You must have someone come take care of him AT LEAST twice a day, if not three times. Puppies that she can typically only hold it 2-3 hours. Otherwise he will struggle to be house trained. Huskies are extremely high energy dogs, and so you should look into dog walkers and obedience schools and maybe daycare a because otherwise you will have a dog that's absolutely insane with pent up energy. I see huskies between 9-24 months end up in shelters all the time because they have 'too much energy' or have bad manners and behaviors that are the result of boredom. So I hope you spend lots of time with your little guy and make sure he learns manners and is properly physically and mentally busy.
 

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Even if it's only twice a week he has to be in his crate that long, you will find house-training a very difficult process. He is going to toilet in his crate. Often. I would also be concerned about his eating/drinking habits. Puppies should be eating three times a day and should have access to fresh water all day.
 

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Im just saying. I did pretty much the same thing you did. I bought a lab on a friday, went back to work on Tuesday. After that she was in her crate for 8.5 hours per day. Never once did ahe pee or poop in her crate. However i was up ever two hours with her through the night and when i got home from work every two hours. She was fine but this doesnt mean you're will be fine lol juat my experience
 

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Im just saying. I did pretty much the same thing you did. I bought a lab on a friday, went back to work on Tuesday. After that she was in her crate for 8.5 hours per day. Never once did ahe pee or poop in her crate. However i was up ever two hours with her through the night and when i got home from work every two hours. She was fine but this doesnt mean you're will be fine lol juat my experience
That works if this person, like you has a schedule where they want their dog to have a backwards one--sleep all day and up and down all night. But they said this will only happen twice a week so we will assume the pup will have a normal schedule 5 days out of the week. That would throw him off and mean he would be awake during the day, therefore more likely to have accidents.
 
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A lot of people do what you are doing. It works out okay, but there are some hurdles.

#1 the pup will learn to sleep during the day and be active at night. This later on may not be what you desire

#2 the dog will be harder to housebreak any time it has an accident in the crate and has to spend time with that accident. It becomes 'normal' and starts to override the natural tenancy to be clean that is what is utilized when housebreaking.

There are some options you have.

First, get a dog-walker to come in and relieve the little guy half-way through the day.

2nd option is to find a room like a kitchen or bathroom you can shut off with baby-gates, treat it like a giant play-crate for the pup, expecting him to pee/poo as well. This room will always be a temptation for potty in the future, but you will have much better luck house training. If you combine standard house training with a bell at the door or some other indicator you teach your dog to use, when he has to go he thinks 'I need to go, it's okay to go on the grass or in the kitchen, but everywhere else in the house is off-limits so Ill go pee in the kitchen' but now you put 'I need to go, I need to ring the bell' in front of that thought train, allowing you to then open the door and go outside.
 

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A lot of people do what you are doing. It works out okay, but there are some hurdles.

#1 the pup will learn to sleep during the day and be active at night. This later on may not be what you desire

#2 the dog will be harder to housebreak any time it has an accident in the crate and has to spend time with that accident. It becomes 'normal' and starts to override the natural tenancy to be clean that is what is utilized when housebreaking.

There are some options you have.

First, get a dog-walker to come in and relieve the little guy half-way through the day.

2nd option is to find a room like a kitchen or bathroom you can shut off with baby-gates, treat it like a giant play-crate for the pup, expecting him to pee/poo as well. This room will always be a temptation for potty in the future, but you will have much better luck house training. If you combine standard house training with a bell at the door or some other indicator you teach your dog to use, when he has to go he thinks 'I need to go, it's okay to go on the grass or in the kitchen, but everywhere else in the house is off-limits so Ill go pee in the kitchen' but now you put 'I need to go, I need to ring the bell' in front of that thought train, allowing you to then open the door and go outside.

I went with a play pen and pee pads for my guy when he was little and I was at work (+ lunch time walks for the first month). He is now 100% house trained, including the room his pen and pee pads were in. It definitely took an extra month or two to get him all the way trained but I now trust him to have free reign of my place and any place that we visit. I will say that I got lucky with the fact that he picked up using the pee pads right away (never had an accident off them when they were provided as an option), that he never associated soft surfaces (mats, rugs, etc) with an OK place to pee and that he saw his pen as enough of a den space that he didn't want to go in there.
 

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I've raised puppies while working full-time with no outside help. You may be surprised how some pups can learn quickly to hold their bladders/bowels until you come home. Let's be realistic here, not everyone is going to have a dog walker or have their dog in daycare. Tynan & Timber were babies when I was working full-time and I've had at least 6 foster puppies here. Tynan & Timber are 100% reliable now, were not a nightmare to housetrain as puppies, and did not take any longer than a puppy who has their owner around longer during the day. It can be done, you just need to make sure to give lots of time when you arrive home from work. Puppies are not as delicate as we may think they are.
 

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I agree that I would baby gate off an area, usually the bathroom or laundry room or something similar where the puppy can stay during the day with newspaper down and food and water. I say newspaper as I have found they just love to tear up their puppy pads. As it is a big breed, it would be hard to keep him in a pen. At least then he can move around and play during the day and be more inclined to sleep at night in the crate when you are able to take him outside. By ten or eleven weeks or sometimes even sooner, he should be alright all day in the crate.

When I got my last puppy, I have a pen set up like above and by the time she was nine weeks old, she has never gone to the bathroom in there even when left all day and I never had to take her out overnight when it was so cold out. She is four months old now.
 

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I'll chime in for the baby gate and bathroom/laundry room/whatever idea. It gives the pup a little more room to play, and he can potty away from his sleeping area.
I mentioned this on another thread, but I never thought I'd get my youngest dog house trained thanks to having to leave him shut up all day while I was at work and he was too young to control his bladder/bowels for that long. I'm lucky that I had a room in my horse barn where I eventually moved him to save the house from further destruction and soiling (thought not until he'd Christened pretty much every room and surface!). To start with he'd still potty in the room in the barn, but gradually, as he got older, that started to decrease. Now, unless he's sick or something, it doesn't happen. I didn't "train" it out of him, he just matured and realized he could hold it and being in a room with his own feces and urine wasn't so great.
So don't fret too much if the pup has a lot of accidents.
But yeah, locking him in his crate for 8 hours might be a bit too stressful and uncomfortable for such a young one. You don't want him to start hating the crate, and you also want him to have enough room to play and maybe wear himself out a little so that when you are ready to go to sleep he is too! Leave him with plenty of toys, and just be prepared to clean up a mess on those days when you get home. Pee, poop, shredded newspapers or pee pads, and whatever else he gets into that you never thought he'd get into, LOL! Maybe a chewed baby gate! And a little tip, they can climb. I actually had to put up two baby gates, one on top of the other to create a full height barrier for my ultra athletic puppy. And huskies are known for being escape artists!
Good luck!
 

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If you can't take off anymore days from work, I suggest having a family member or friend either watch them until you are home, or having someone come out every few hours. Maybe look on Care in areas near you, there's a lot of teenagers looking for jobs and I'm sure it would be easy to find someone to help you out, especially if it's only two days a week.
 
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