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I wanted to start a new Thread on the threat of the dreaded and lethal Covid-19 Virus on dogs and the potential transmission to and by humans. There seems to be little information on the issue as the focus is on humans, but I have read that this virus easily transmits from and among a variety of animal species, including humans. Reports suggest that many humans have no symptoms but can carry and pass the disease, and I would suspect that it is even more difficult to determine whether a dog or other pet might be carrying the virus. Since our dear dogs quickly engage in body contact with other dogs and sometimes humans, I have heard that it is prudent to confine your dog inside rather than risk contracting or transmitting the virus. Does anyone have any information on this? I have not seen and warnings or advice, which makes me wonder whether the issue is just being swept under the rug in light of the need to walk our dogs on a regular basis.
 

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Indeed. The virus can be harboured on the dog's coat, in the same way as it can on any other surface so it is wise not to handle anyone else's dog or allow them to touch yours. But the reason you have seen no reports isn't because the issue is being concealed, it is because its not a concern. So walk your dog but take precautions as advised. Stay away from other people and keep your dog on leash, if he runs off people won't be able to help you look for him. Avoid driving to walks if you can, if you were to have an accident it puts strain on the health services and they could do without that at the moment. Wash your hands, thoroughly and regularly. Don't touch your face.

This is the UK advice, it may be slightly different in other countries but the main principles will be likely to be similar.

 

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actually reports on German Dutch and Australian websites are all saying only fragments of the virus have been found on dog's fur. The risk cones with whole strands. So unless you're kissing your dog and then you allow someone else to pet your dog there is no risk .. I still think this is scaremongering and we can really do without that.
 

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actually reports on German Dutch and Australian websites are all saying only fragments of the virus have been found on dog's fur. The risk cones with whole strands.
That's good to know, MM, thanks - it's something I'd wondered about :)
 

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I tend to be pretty cautious with this virus, but everything I have heard and read, says the risk of catching it from your dog is somewhere between, extremely unlikely to non-existent.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wanted to start a new Thread on the threat of the dreaded and lethal Covid-19 Virus on dogs and the potential transmission to and by humans. There seems to be little information on the issue as the focus is on humans, but I have read that this virus easily transmits from and among a variety of animal species, including humans. Reports suggest that many humans have no symptoms but can carry and pass the disease, and I would suspect that it is even more difficult to determine whether a dog or other pet might be carrying the virus. Since our dear dogs quickly engage in body contact with other dogs and sometimes humans, I have heard that it is prudent to confine your dog inside rather than risk contracting or transmitting the virus. Does anyone have any information on this? I have not seen and warnings or advice, which makes me wonder whether the issue is just being swept under the rug in light of the need to walk our dogs on a regular basis.
I tend to be pretty cautious with this virus, but everything I have heard and read, says the risk of catching it from your dog is somewhere between, extremely unlikely to non-existent.
I appreciate all of the helpful input, but the reason that I started the forum was due to the concern that this virus is that 1. there is much evidence that this virus passes from a variety of animals, not just humans; 2 It is part of the same family of viruses that is very active among canines; 3. it has mild symptoms among many healthy humans, and it is particularly difficult to determine when our lovely dogs might be infected by this or other viruses; 4. it is impossible to have our dogs practice "social distancing" when out in public; and 5. while the online reports from CDC and other WEB MD state that there is no evidence of risk for dogs and other pets, they offer no pharmacological evidence why that would be the case.
I also note this story that appeared recently in on Bloomberg:

 

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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate all of the helpful input, but the reason that I started the forum was due to the concern that this virus is that 1. there is much evidence that this virus passes from a variety of animals, not just humans; 2 It is part of the same family of viruses that is very active among canines; 3. it has mild symptoms among many healthy humans, and it is particularly difficult to determine when our lovely dogs might be infected by this or other viruses; 4. it is impossible to have our dogs practice "social distancing" when out in public; and 5. while the online reports from CDC and other WEB MD state that there is no evidence of risk for dogs and other pets, they offer no pharmacological evidence why that would be the case.
I also note this story that appeared recently in on Bloomberg:

 

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reports from CDC and other WEB MD state that there is no evidence of risk for dogs and other pets,
And there is your answer. Stop trying to create problems where there are none. People have enough to worry about as it is.
I have reread scientific reports which state as yet only partial parts of the virus strand have been detected on the fur of pets from infected patients.
The advice is clear exercise caution wash your hands do not kiss sneeze or snot on your dog and do not allow others to cough sneeze snot on your dog
 

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Advice in the UK now is that even though there is no evidence of spread via contact with dogs, to be on the safe side people should prevent their dogs from going up to other people. And it IS possible, I did it this morning. Walked on lead to a quiet place with good visibility, let him off there while keeping a lookout, went into the woods and put him on lead there as there obviously isn't such good visbility. If anyone isn't able to do that, then this is a good opportunity to train your dog.

A dog being managed responsibly outside is far less of a risk (probably no risk whatsoever) than a human outside, even when the human is socially distancing, so it makes no sense at all to suggest they should all be confined. Stick to facts, not conjecture.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am just going off what I have read (Bloomberg article pasted), and I am not surprised that the UK and others outside the U.S. must operate under different guidelines. I simply noted that there have been two dogs in Hong Kong that tested positive and likely received the virus from humans who they were close to. Since this is a novel virus that is suspected to have originated with animal species in China and then passed to humans, it seems likely that it would pass between humans and pets in the same way as other corona viruses. In addition, I would point you to an interview with a highly regarded Vet in the U.S. who had this to say in an interview on NPR that I am having difficulty pasting the link to. It notes that there has not been enough testing because of the priority given to humans.

Are cats at risk of catching the coronavirus?
We just don’t know. Right now, the only 2 pets that have tested positive are 2 dogs in Hong Kong. There has been a drastic lack of testing because resources have been prioritized to humans during this period. There is some thought that it may be able to pass to cats, though. SARS is a very similar virus and experimentally a few cats were able to be infected during that outbreak. The good news is they showed no clinical signs and did not seem to get sick from it. So while there is a possibility, no cats have yet been found to be infected and if they were, it is suspected they will be like dogs: infected but not sick or infectious.
 

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Again please. The dogs tested in hong kong belonged to infected people and were themselves no considered a risk of transmitting the disease. The transmission in China is said to have come from eating the flesh of an infected animal much the same way that BSE in cows mutated to become CJD in humans. Only now after a further mutation is the virus airborne and transmissable between humans in close contact or by skin to skin contact. ( surfaces can be a risk factor ie close contact) which is why hand washing is so important.

You started this thread asking if anyone had information. You have been referred to sources giving reliable information and given information but you seem determined to continue to spread scare stories.
The facts as we know them as given by The WHO and CDC plus the Dutch RIVM the German BMG : (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit) even the UK Govt in line with Defra and the BVA give advice only referring to people who are infected with the virus.

For those people extra precautions apply for most people social distancing , washing hands and being extra careful when handling pets and avoiding coughing sneezing and kisses pets is advised.

Of course this is a virus it could mutate further but it has not done so yet.

Could we please stick to facts and not go off into the realms of possibilty , fear and general ignorence?

Oh and before anyone asks, Yes this is a virus that you could catch from a toilet seat...
 

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So to summarise, the dog in Hong Kong was owned by someone who had COVID-19. The dog tested ”weak positive” which means it wasn't likely to be able to spread the disease.

The World Health Organisation has stated, “There is no evidence that a dog, cat or any pet can transmit COVID-19. COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly.”
 

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Panic solves nothing, an abundance of caution can and does. I certainly have concerns about the virus, and we are practicing staying at home, and when we or I do have to go out for essentials, practice 'social distancing'. I have always been and continue to control who our dog is allowed to interact with, maybe a bit more caution these days, life does go on even though it may now be in a somewhat modified manner.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I completely agree that panic is not the answer, but caution is. I think it is wise to exercise the same separation with our dogs as we have been advised in the U.S. to do as humans. The WHO is not focused on animals, only humans, and their credibility has been severely undermined in this COVID-19 crisis in connection with the original outbreak in China. The concern with dogs and other pets is that there is no testing going on, so there is no way of determining the extent to which the virus is extant in the dog/cat and other domestic animal population. Most people downplayed the likely spread of the virus after it finally was disclosed in China, but the ramp up of testing in humans has clearly demonstrated how quickly and easily the virus spreads and how widespread it is. It is difficult to ascertain symptoms in virus, and they are more likely to pick something up given their loving nature as reflected with their in discriminant use of their mouths and tongues. Since the virus is believed to have been passed from the animal population, I question how anyone can be so assured as some making posts that the virus is not already being passed around within our dogs.
 

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We should all be following the rules and guidance given; if anyone wishes to be more cautious still, and avoid touching animals, then clearly they can choose to do that and shouldn't be criticised for that choice.
 

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I have looked through the discussions started by the OP and it seems they have a serious problem or anxiety regarding possible dog to human transmission of illness..

May I suggest a visit to a therapist because this is obviously a long term problem and not one directly related to covid19
 
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