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I have a 10yo male Pitbull very well behaved. I have recently gotten an intact Pyrenees who is probably 7 or 8 months old. The pyrenees has been trying to show his dominance by attacking our Pitbull. The pit has just taken the abuse many times and walked away with bloody ears or a scratch on the head. The pyrenees did it again more aggressively a few days ago and this time my Pitbull had enough and unleashed fury on the pyrenees. I had to kick my Pitbull off. Thankfully no serious injuries other than the pyrenees limping for a couple of days and a damaged ego. Now the pyrenees is utterly afraid of the Pitbull and in no way wants to dominate him...and now the Pitbull seems like he's on the verge of unleashing fury on the pyrenees whenever they are around each other. Im afraid to allow them to be around each other without a chaperone. In many cases the pyrenees will retreat to our back pasture. Any suggestions on how to get these two to live in "harmony" and is my pyrenees going to be a useless wuss from his bruised ego when it comes to doing his job of protecting our livestock?
 

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I'm having a similar issue with an 8yo Boxer and a 5yo Pit Bull and started another thread on it.

Both neutered and very well behaved separately and together most of the time. We had the Boxer before the Pit, so the Pit has always been around the Boxer with no issue for the last 5 years. Over the course of the last several months, there has been increasing tension between the two. Sometimes the Pit attacks the Boxer for no reason, other times it's the other way around and USUALLY without me being in the room, but luckily close by to break it up quickly.

Yesterday they got into it when my Boxer was at the water bowl and the Pit walked by. My Boxer attacked my pit out of the blue, but when my Pit defended himself, he had grabbed one of my Boxer's legs I had to also kick him off, which I have NEVER done and hate myself for it.

They got into it tonight again and I seperated them for a while, the Pit receiving the worst of it tonight with some pretty deep facial lacerations. When I brought them back together a few hours later, the Pit acted like nothing was wrong but my Boxer was a nervous nellie.
I let them feel the tension for a few minutes before separating them again and going about my business.

I feel your pain...I'm not sure what to do about it either. I'm trying different things, but all things require 100% dedication and patience. It also requires you to be the alpha and for the dogs to know and respect that.

Dogs are a constant responsibility, even as they get older.

I think most of it is helping the dog to gain their confidence without being aggressive. Sometimes that means expending pent up energy via exercise. I've always heard that a tired dog is a good dog.

I had a Schnauzer/Terrier mix that spoiled me. She was 20lb of pure female force and would walk into any dog pack and be mama dog. I never had to worry about her whether it was a yorkie or a Pit. She would either 1.) put any dog in their place no matter their size or 2.) no one would ever mess with her because she just carried that much confidence.
I lost her a little over a year ago to sudden cardiac arrest. She was just about to turn 11.
 

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The first thing you should focus on is to prevent this from happening. When you’re not capable of being in control or supervising the dogs they should be separated. To make this work you need to be able to take great responsibility, put in time and effort and then also be aware that this situation might not be solvable, some dogs just don’t work together.

A great way to build a relationship between dogs is by taking them on long walks together. But for this to be safe you need someone that can walk one of the dogs. Just walk the dogs side by side without letting them interact. Walk for maybe an hour a day, the longer the better. Then keep them separated inside. In this way you can build their relationship in a safe way. Look how they respond and react to one another, when they feel good together you can start letting them interact outside. But if you ever suspect any conflict, separate them. I would say that, if it works, the best way is to separate them inside is by a gate so they can still see each other but can’t reach one another. This makes it easier to reintroduce them to each other later if they’re used to be in company with the other dog.When they’re good together outdoors and acts calm and comfortable with each other through the gate let them spend time indoors together, under your supervision. Don’t make a big deal about it, just let them be in the same room, you could even start to distract them if they’re trying to interact.Same here, if you see any sort of indication of conflict, seperate them. Don’t let them be together when they have something they can be possessive over like food, bones, toys etc. If you feel like you can’t be sure how to control the situation or how to manage the dogs, take help from a dog trainer (not a domination/alpha trainer). The last thing you want is another fight.

It also requires you to be the alpha and for the dogs to know and respect that.
Please don’t listen to this theory. The theory of alpha and domination comes from a small study of captivated wolfs and have ben disproved by modern research. The problems with this study was that 1. Captivated wolf don’t act like wolfs in the wild 2. Dogs aren’t wolfs. 3. Humans aren’t dogs nor wolfs, you can’t apply their behavior on us.

So skip the thinking that you have to be the alpha and dominate the dog otherwise the dog will take on the role as the alpha and will rule the household, It’s not true. The dogs might need clear rules and a confident approach, but they don’t need to be dominated and you should not try to be an “alpha”.
 
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