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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone!
So, I got a new rough collie puppy a couple of weeks ago, and I’ve noticed several things that I’m not sure what to think about.
1.She will NOT stop play biting. We’ve tried several things to deter this, such as stopping play time when she starts it, sharply saying “no,” or picking up her and placing her back on the ground when she calms down. I’ve also tried to focus her attention on learning basic commands to keep her mind busy. None of it appears to be working well. She bites way too hard and those little puppy teeth are sharp! She cannot be handled really without breaking out the teeth.
2. She doesn’t like to cuddle and doesn’t want affection. This may bother me even more than the biting. She doesn’t care to be petted, and never wants to be held or just spend time lounging next to anyone. All she wants to do is chase and bite.

I thoroughly researched the rough collie breed before purchasing, and thought I was getting an intensely loyal, sweet, and intelligent dog. I know that she’s just a puppy, but this is disappointing. My family is starting to avoid poor Clementine because they’re tired of getting their legs shredded by teeth. I don’t blame them, it is very frustrating.

Any ideas/thoughts/resolutions?
 

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If it's been two weeks, and you have tried ”several” things, my guess is that you haven't been consistent enough - pick one thing, stick to that, and the message is much clearer.

Some people find a sharp 'ouch' works but it can just ramp up the excitement. Some people find putting a toy in the dog's mouth works, others find the puppy is still more interested in nipping hands. My preferred method is to teach her that teeth on skin equals end of fun. So as soon as she makes contact, walk out of the room for a few moments. As long as the whole family is consistent - do it immediately and do it every time - she will learn. You could use a house line to draw her away, which keeps your hands both out of reach and also keeps hands for only good things.

For being affectionate, you may find it takes months until her true personality emerges, possibly not until she reaches adulthood. I recommend the five second rule for nervous dogs but it could be helpful for her too.

Stroke her for five seconds (some dogs prefer you avoid the head) then stop. Only if she initiates further contact by nudging you or similar, continue for another five seconds then stop again. Continue only for as long as she keeps asking. That gives her control over how much she is touched and in turn that will build her confidence around being petted by you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay. I will try to be more consistent. Hopefully something will work soon. As for being affectionate, are collies usually affectionate? Clementine loves to play with people, but that’s pretty much it. She’ll slip away when she’s more relaxed. If I set her on the sofa with me, she always heads to the other side to stretch out.
 

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She is what she is - but you can't force affection. Maybe she will develop more in time - or you may find there are occasions, like times of the day, when she wants to snuggle up. Right now my boy is dozing in another room but when he wants to nestle next to me, he will come and do that. Usually at inconvenient times but you take what you get!

I'd say don't force it, if someone was always asking you for a hug they would actually become quite annoying and you would feel like snuggling less, not more. So let her make the moves.

Playing games with her is a good start though, have a look at Denise Fenzi's fabulous site on training and engagement games. A good place to start with engagement is ”watch me” which is a training skill every dog and owner should use imo. If you can't find anything on it, shout out and I'll describe how.
 
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