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Our poor male shepherd has had an infected/snotty nose for years now. When he first got it we took him to the vet. and he was put on a long round of AB's. He would be better afterward for a month or two and then it would come back. He went through 3 rounds with in a year or so. It is only on one side of his nose. He had x-rays to see if they could see something (nothing was seen expect inflammation). He sneezes a lot, does that hard, repetitive nose breathing thing, and his nose is crusted most of the time. I think he has a fever right now too. Is there a ENT for dogs? Has anyone had any experience with this? Thanks for any help. He is 8 years old.
 

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That is a good guess. I changed his dog food because I thought it might be the pea sized kibble getting stuck up his nose. Thank you for the input Rain.
 

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You're welcome!

I really hope that you can figure out what the cause it. It only occurring on one side of his nose is what's making me think it could be a foxtail.
 

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This is not a rare situation but a very frustrating one. The problem is NOT the nose but the sinuses… which are very complex structures with lots of places for 'things' to hide (and virtually no way of finding them exists other than pretty expensive procedures)- particularly in dogs which have a lot of sinus passage ways compared to humans. These is no easy way of looking into these directly, or even with a bronchoscope (which is entered into the nasal passages under anesthesia from the back of the throat where the 'holes' into the passages are much larger). MRI is really the best way to find these 'things' that tend to either grow or get lodged in dogs sinuses. Polyps, tumors, granulomas and fungi can grow in dog noses, and cause chronic nasal discharge. Also grasses, foxtails, dirt, objects etc. can end up being inhaled into them with similar (though usually more violent) symptoms. I wish there was an easy way to diagnose and treat these dogs, but there isn't yet. But specialists can help… just be prepared to spend a bit of money.
 
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