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I live in an apartment complex and would like to get a dog, but I was wondering if y’all had any suggestions. I know I’m asking a lot haha, but I’d like a bigger dog breed versus a small dog. And one that doesn’t shed a ton, is rather calm, and got a good temperament
 

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Ok, we have your size and grooming preferences (perfectly reasonable). What are you looking for in terms of exercise requirements, trainability, sociability with people and animals versus aloofness, and independence versus handler focus? Have you had a dog before and if so what worked well then?
 

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What can you offer the dog? What kind of activities would you like to do? How would a normal week for the dog look like, how much/long walks, what other activities, alone time? Would you prefer a dog that guards/alerts, a dog that is more likely to barking, or one that is more likely to be quieter? Do you aspire to teach the dog to walk off leash, in other terms, is it preferable to have a dog with low hunting instincts? Do you wish for the dog to be more social or reserved with strangers? How much need of grooming is preferred? What do you count as a “bigger dog” and what is “ a good temper” to you?
 

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Ok, we have your size and grooming preferences (perfectly reasonable). What are you looking for in terms of exercise requirements, trainability, sociability with people and animals versus aloofness, and independence versus handler focus? Have you had a dog before and if so what worked well then?
I’d be taking the dog for a walk everyday after work and then playing with it in my apartment, I want one that’s good with other people and dogs. I’ve had 2 dogs before, a Jack Russell terrier and a yellow lab. I loved my yellow lab to death but the only thing he shed so bad that if you touched him your clothes would be covered in dog hair.
 

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Personally, if I were you, I'd look into getting a rescue greyhound. They are around 3 years old when retired from track, past the crazy puppy stage, and are generally perfectly willing to lay around the apartment until you are ready to take them for walks and play with them. There's a reason they are called 60mph couch potatoes. Super fast but also not overly energetic. Everyone that I've met has been a good dog, with a good temperament, I'd love to have one if my apartment complex didn't have a 20 lb dog limit.

Please note that they are NOT usually good with small pets, guinea pigs, cats, ferrets, rabbits, etc, will likely be viewed as prey and something to chase. Most are NOT good off leash, if they spot something to chase they will be gone before you can blink. They are not cold tolerant, if you live where it gets cold the dog will need a coat.
 

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I’d be taking the dog for a walk everyday after work and then playing with it in my apartment, I want one that’s good with other people and dogs. I’ve had 2 dogs before, a Jack Russell terrier and a yellow lab. I loved my yellow lab to death but the only thing he shed so bad that if you touched him your clothes would be covered in dog hair.
LOL, then a German shed, er..., Shepherd, is out of the question.
 

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What about while you are at work? Is there someone else around or would you be able to get a dog walker to call in?
 

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I’d be taking the dog for a walk everyday after work and then playing with it in my apartment, I want one that’s good with other people and dogs. I’ve had 2 dogs before, a Jack Russell terrier and a yellow lab. I loved my yellow lab to death but the only thing he shed so bad that if you touched him your clothes would be covered in dog hair.
Would that be all the activity and exercise the dog would get? That description doesn’t suit any breed to be honest.
 

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Stairs aren't good for a dog's joints, even when in their prime. While it is a puppy and when it is too old to do stairs at all, are you going to be able to carry it up and down several times a day? (And some dogs dislike being carried intensely.)
 

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I actually just wrote a blog post about our experience raising an English Bulldog. There's many pros and cons to the breed but they work well with limited space and not a lot of exercise. Stairs can be tough but are manageable. Check out the post if you want details at collaroy.com. It won't let me add the link to the blog itself but if you scroll to the bottom of the page and click on blog you'll find it.

And if 50 lbs sounds too big, French Bulldogs or similar breeds like Pugs or Boston Terriers might also be viable options. Good luck!
 

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I'd just add that if you choose to look at brachycephallic breeds (the flat faced ones) please research the health problems extreme breeding can cause. That's not to say all of them are bred to the extreme, but as they are so popular they are targeted by puppy farmers (puppy mills) who don't have their health and welfare as a priority so it really is a case of buyer beware.
 

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JoanneF is totally right. While we loved our English Bulldog, we had to do a lot of research on the breeder before feeling comfortable purchasing. We weren't focused on show quality or even full papers but you still need to know what conditions the dog is born into. Bulldogs can bring a high price tag and because of that there seems to be 'breeders' everywhere now. Just do your research before committing both on the breed itself and on the breeder. I would say the same for any dog/breed you're looking at but more so with some of the more popular breeds.
 
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