Dog Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hiya Hiya!
There is a new furbaby onboard and I am hoping to pick y’all’s brains about my Cavalier.
-Are probiotics beneficial for ear health and / or could they help with gunky smelly wax secretion? (Vet said no infection, just dirty yeasty ears)
-Does anyone have information about the Blue Merle coat that my furbaby has?
-What is the general opinion of ‘bell potty training’ (We’re in a high rise building so I’m trying to teach her to ring bell to go outdoors)
148C372E-FF81-41AF-9ECE-1251D4991458.jpeg
9AE5DB39-235F-4B58-8C86-3D68520208CC.jpeg
B11BBB2B-6B64-4426-9CF4-8D8FDC039BA0.jpeg
F6467777-8275-49AF-AD87-70389ED3E8C1.jpeg
3ADF590C-7004-4641-9DBA-94EC71D726C2.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
Welcome...that is a pretty irresistible pup. I hope she doesn't even have any of the health problems that have been associated with that breed. If you got her from a genuinely good and reputable breeder, she should be fine.

If she has "yeasty" ears, to me that sounds as if that is something to treat....and if she has excess wax, that should be removed? Of course, I am not a vet, so maybe I don't know what I am talking about.

How old is she?

You will get varying opinions on "bell" training for asking to go out. I don't think there is a thing wrong with it, although I have always just had dogs who went to the door, or who got my attention in some other way, when they wanted to go out. I think if a person is attentive to their dog, the dog can communicate in other ways than ringing a bell. But there's nothing wrong with a bell.

I know Joanne, a frequent poster and moderator here. disagrees on that. She says it's a good way to end up being your dog's doorman. But in my experience, that has not happened. Now, if the dog starts using the bell (or any other means) to try to go out - go in- go out- go in many times a day, that should be curbed. But I don't know that a bell makes that any more likely to happen.

I don't mind letting my dogs go out whenever they want to, but then I don't live in a highrise.

As for the merle coat, I don't know anything about it myself but you could probably get a lot of information on that from Google. It sure is a pretty combination - that merle coat and then a little bit of tan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome...that is a pretty irresistible pup. I hope she doesn't even have any of the health problems that have been associated with that breed. If you got her from a genuinely good and reputable breeder, she should be fine.

If she has "yeasty" ears, to me that sounds as if that is something to treat....and if she has excess wax, that should be removed? Of course, I am not a vet, so maybe I don't know what I am talking about.

How old is she?

You will get varying opinions on "bell" training for asking to go out. I don't think there is a thing wrong with it, although I have always just had dogs who went to the door, or who got my attention in some other way, when they wanted to go out. I think if a person is attentive to their dog, the dog can communicate in other ways than ringing a bell. But there's nothing wrong with a bell.

I know Joanne, a frequent poster and moderator here. disagrees on that. She says it's a good way to end up being your dog's doorman. But in my experience, that has not happened. Now, if the dog starts using the bell (or any other means) to try to go out - go in- go out- go in many times a day, that should be curbed. But I don't know that a bell makes that any more likely to happen.

I don't mind letting my dogs go out whenever they want to, but then I don't live in a highrise.

As for the merle coat, I don't know anything about it myself but you could probably get a lot of information on that from Google. It sure is a pretty combination - that merle coat and then a little bit of tan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Madra, I appreciate your feedback.

She is 4 months old now.

I am fortunate enough to stay at home with her all day so I definitely have an advantage in regards to what she needs and when. Our days are jammed packed with playing / training / sleeping.

She has mostly great days with an odd off day or two (don’t we all 🤷🏽‍♀️).

It’s great for both of us that we live in a pet rich building. She has friends everywhere in other dogs and their humans. It’s fascinating to learn what works / doesn’t for everyone.

As far as her ears are concerned, they are not bad by any means. I was asking for preventive advice. I clean them daily with a dry tissue and an ear wipe once a week. We live in a humid environment so I’m overly cautious just in case.

The google has not been terribly informative about her coat. From what I understand, her coloring is not recognized at all for Cavaliers (for the record, I do not care one way or another what she actually is, I just love genetics and want to know as much as possible.). :)

I also adore the idea of this forum and have enjoyed reading the Q&A. Knowledge is clutch. I truly look forward to contributing once I am more educated and sharing the experiences as she grows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
She's very cute, but merles do not naturally occur in cavaliers, and are usually the result of irresponsible breeding, or mixing multiple breeds. What breeder did you get her from? That way you can trace back the pedigree. If you PM me, I can give you more information. Also, welcome to the forum and nice to meet you and your pup!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,453 Posts
Yeast feeds on sugars, so I'd suggest a diet low in carbohydrates if it is a problem.

And Madra is right, I'm not a fan of bell training. For toilet training, my view is better to be proactive and take the puppy out frequently rather than waiting for her to ask - by the time she realises she needs to toilet, and has rung the bell, and you have stopped what you were doing and put your shoes on - it could be too late and she has had an accident. And with toilet training, your aim is to have every toilet outside.

Then, as an adult, as Madra says, my concern is that a lot of dogs will use the bell to have you let them out - just not out to toilet. So you are up and down like a yo-yo.

She is a lovely looking girl, I look forward to seeing more of her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Beautiful pup!
Most floppy eared dogs are susceptible to ear problems, since the ear flaps do not let in fresh air to keep them dry and healthy.
When I owned beagles, they were constantly having ear issues, and regular cleaning was a must. If kept up with, deep cleaning was rarely needed, but you might ask your vet how to clean a dog's "L" shaped ear canal, just in case.
There are all kinds of safe solutions that are available, either from your vet or over the counter.
Lifting the ear flaps and taking a smell is a sure way to spot an ear yeast problem before the dog begins to suffer.

Some dogs have allergies to certain foods (like chicken based foods) that can also exacerbate the problems.

Zymox is my choice but there are others.

 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top