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I'm having trouble with my sammie puppy Ellie
I've taken time off during the summer to be with her for the first couple of months whilst she's still so young but i feel i'm doing everything wrong when it comes to her training
This is quite a list so i hope you'll bear with me

First of all i cannot seem to leave her alone either in her crate or in another room without her shrieking at the top of her lungs and soiling herself instantly.
I try to do it gradually but as soon as we've made some progress it feels like she regresses to being afraid :(

I also have issues with her housetraining. She is 14 weeks old yet seems to not understand that eliminating inside is a no no. I try to catch her and put her on the pads when she crouches inside but just waits until i have my back turned to do it somewhere else. It's frustrating because i know she just doesn't understand me and that ultimately its my wrong doing
She doesn't give me any warning and i simply cant stay up all night to avoid waking up to the smell of urine

Even though there are more, these are the issues that worry me the most. I'm starting work at the end of the month and i feel i wont be able to leave her even for an hour if this continues

If someone has any advice or support i could really use it x
 

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Hello,

Not sure how helpful this will be, but it might give you some ideas until somebody else comes along :)

If she's freaking out when you're leaving her, you need to slow up a little as you're moving too quickly for her. Have you trained her to love her crate, firstly without closing the door and leaving her in there at all? Does she have something really awesome to keep her busy when you distance yourself from her, such as a Kong stuffed with wet food and a little peanut butter?

For toilet training, how often are you taking her outside? When my Staffy was a puppy we took her out every hour, and also twice in the night too. If she ate a meal, had a big drink or a big play session she went out then, too. If we took her out on the hour and she didn't go, we brought her back inside and tried again in 15 minutes.

Once she toileted in the garden, we made a HUGE fuss of her (not soon enough that it distracted her in the middle of peeing, though!). Lots of excitement and lots of high value treats. Really quickly she learnt that "go for a wee wee" meant go to the toilet, and would race out, do her business, then sprint back like the happiest pup ever because it meant treats and fun time!

If your pup is going frequently in the house, you need to keep a really really close eye on her. You can tie her to your waist with a longline, so she is always with you. Try learn what her behaviour is just before she goes (sniffing? circling?) Also, be sure you don't scold or punish her when you find an accident or catch her in the act...all that does is teach her she shouldn't potty around you. At most you could say "[name] outside, outside, come on!" in a lets'-be-quick way, then praise if she goes outside.

I don't have any advice about using puppy pads because we didn't use them, but I'm sure someone will :)
 

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If you haven't done this already, try to clean up accidents with an enzymatic cleaner. Your puppy may be going to places off the pee pads that she has gone before. Getting rid of the scent with the cleaner could be helpful.

Other than that, I second what @Red said. Take the dog out frequently, praise her endlessly and shower her with treats when she eliminates outside or on the pads, and try to recognize her signals as best as possible. Keeping her tethered to you could be helpful, or keeping her in a confined space, like a room blocked off with a gate could be helpful as well (with you in the room as well). Also, if you're not taking her out in the night, try doing that too. Puppies often can't hold their bladder that long. It is not pleasant, but waking up at intervals to take her out will be helpful. As the puppy gets older, you can increase the amount of time between the intervals and gradually get through the night.

I don't have much advice on the crate/separation piece, but I'm sure others will chime in. My dog did this too...and I can't really remember how we got through it! Oh, the things we repress when dealing with puppies...
 
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