Dog Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
21 - 25 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,313 Posts
is all this hernia talk giving anyone else the heebee jeebeez? I keep putting my hand on my stomach and thinking happy thoughts...
My hubby had a hernia that appeared suddenly in his tummy a few years ago. He had to have it repaired. It was just day surgery. They put a synthetic "patch" in there, like a tire patch! The doc looked like Doogie Howser... he was about 5 feet tall and 120 pounds and appeared to be about 22 years old. He was very competent. It was just a funny contrast though, as my dear man is rather tall. Anyway, the taller they are the harder they fall. Doug was last out of the hospital for that day's surgery as he kept passing out every time he tried to stand up. All the little old ladies and kids had recovered from their surgeries first! Poor man!

Just a funny hernia story... somewhat off topic, but maybe adds some levity to this thread that was threatening to go south not long ago! :p

Carry on... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,237 Posts
To the OP, Ask your breeder about this, and if it's viewed upon negatively by judges, you may want to decide how much you want to keep the pup versus being successful in the ring. Or, check with your national, regional, or local breed or showing club.

Re: the great umb. hernia debate (I've a ten year history with it...)
Personally, I find the whole "delayed closures" argument bull, as that is essentially what an umb. hernia is. The breeders I've seen use this argument have other traits I've noticed that makes them appear to be awfully concerned with selling pups/$$. You know, if you can tell a prospective buyer that this may not be a "true" hernia but instead a "delayed closure" then maybe they'll still give you the cash....

As to the genetic component, some are genetic; I have experienced this. Others consider some umb. hernias to be from solely as a result of physical handling and thus non-inheritable- this is valid, as well. The latter is still debatable as some people still think there may be a general weakness in the area which can be inherited or a faulty growth process for it to close completely which could possible be from a genetic code mistake.

So this is my two cents, if you can find that only one or two puppies out of his litter and any/all half/full litters by either parent, grandparents, and siblings have small umb. hernias, then there's a good chance it wasn't inherited and could be the result of rough handling at birth. If you want to take that chance, it's your perogative. If you have one or two pups in most litters who have an umb. hernia, even if it skips some, it could likely be inherited.

It'd be wise to learn about some basic genetics; as always, the more you can learn, the better if you're really interested in showing/breeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
it is against AKC to show a dog who has had umbilical hernia repair. best option is get your dog neutered and have the hernia fixed at the same time as he is not of breeding quality because of the hernia anyway.
NOT TRUE AT ALL!!!! AKC allows for hernia repair and many other repairs as well including cherry eye
 
21 - 25 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top