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Discussion Starter #1
I'm doing an essay on breed specific legislation and breed banning and we are required to do some field work (in this case a survey). And I know you guys would be a great resource on the topic. If you would like to take the survey the link is bellow, nothing is required so just answer what is applicable to you. Let me know if you have any problems or questions.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DFTY5T5

Oh and if any one has any good resources on breed specific legislation and or breed banning that would be helpful as well.

Thank you in advance.
 

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I always find it interesting and a good visual explanation of the ineffectiveness of BSL to "visit" the animal shelters in an area with BSL to see what sort of animals are being owned by the irresponsible in that area since "dangerous breeds" are banned/restricted.

For example, in Prince Georges County, MD- where BSL prohibiting pit bulls has been in effect for 20 years, as listed here: https://www.animallaw.info/local/md-prince-georges-county-breed-§-3-18501-pit-bull-terriers

This is a listing of currently adoptable animals: www.PetHarbor.com Animal Search: ADOPTABLE

Wow, 90 dogs and only ONE "pit bull" mix to be seen (rolling eyes here :) ). Note that among the numerous pit bull like "not pit bulls", there are also a number of legitimate Am Bulldogs, Rotties, Presas, and Cane Corsos, all of which as breeds IMO probably tend to be equally dangerous when owned by the irresponsible due to their size and tendency toward natural guarding behaviors vs actual pit bulls.

FYI, if you change the criteria from "adoptable" to "stray/found" (put in zip code 20772 on the petharbor home page, then select PGCAMD, then "lost my pet"), there are (gasp!) dozens more pit bulls, many of which are actually listed as their apparent breed. I'm not sure how they choose which are labeled as which, though I believe the "pit bulls" are eventually available for adoption/rescue transfer outside of PG county. My point though is that you can see how well BSL works to stem the tide of pit bulls at large in this area, where they have been illegal for two decades.

The MD Dog Federation has lots of info specific to BSL in PG County, but it applies to other areas as well, and since the ban has been so long standing, it is a good example of how ineffective such measures really are. Lots of articles on their "resources" page.
Maryland Dog Federation - Home
 

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I recently read a book "Pit Bull" by Bronwen Dickey that I've posted about a few times so I'm sorry if it's getting old but I was just so impressed on how well researched the book was and it has a lot of information on how the pit bull's reputation came to be and BSL.

For example, I learned the spitz, a fluffy white precursor to modern breeds like the Pomeranian and American Eskimo dog, was the first breed of dog to be banned in America and demonized by the media in the late 19th century. They were thought to be "especially dangerous as pets," medical journals and textbooks warned. New York Times wrote "There are but four venomous beasts among the fauna of the United States. These are the rattlesnake, the copperhead, the moccasin, and the Spitz dog, and of the four, the latter is by far the most aggressive and deadly in its hostility to man." These little fluffy dogs were America's first "pit bull!"
 

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I recently read a book "Pit Bull" by Bronwen Dickey that I've posted about a few times so I'm sorry if it's getting old but I was just so impressed on how well researched the book was and it has a lot of information on how the pit bull's reputation came to be and BSL.

For example, I learned the spitz, a fluffy white precursor to modern breeds like the Pomeranian and American Eskimo dog, was the first breed of dog to be banned in America and demonized by the media in the late 19th century. They were thought to be "especially dangerous as pets," medical journals and textbooks warned. New York Times wrote "There are but four venomous beasts among the fauna of the United States. These are the rattlesnake, the copperhead, the moccasin, and the Spitz dog, and of the four, the latter is by far the most aggressive and deadly in its hostility to man." These little fluffy dogs were America's first "pit bull!"
I wonder if this has anything to do with "The call of the wild".
 

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I wonder if this has anything to do with "The call of the wild".
It was because there were a lot of rabies outbreaks and they thought that the spitz (breed, not type) carried rabies because a high percentage of the rabid dogs were spitz. The only reason more rabid dogs were spitz was because they were incredibly popular pets and there were more dogs in general that were spitz than other breeds.



Anyways, in the book you learn the dogs themselves have very little to do with BSL and breed bias, and it has much more to do with racism, classism, and media portrayal. There have been no reliable studies done to show that pit bulls have bitten or killed humans more than any other breed. The studies that have been done were taking breed labels from law enforcement or media reports (which were mostly false anyways- the book showed some pictures of the dogs labeled pit bulls by dog bite reports and many did not look anything like one!) and then comparing any dog that had been labeled as "pit bull" to the number of Bull Terriers (a rarer breed than generic pit bull type dogs- but they thought Bull Terriers were pit bulls because the AKC doesn't recognize the APBT) registered by the AKC to find that "pit bulls" had a higher percentage of dog bites per breed. Most information out there on pit bulls and dog bites and fatalities is very very flawed!

I highly recommend it for your project!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for all the help :)
@revolutionrocknroll- I wish I had time to read the book so I could use it for a resource. It sounds really interesting, its deffinitly going in my to read list.
@Aspen726- Thank you :), though I'm not looking forward to writing it given the minimum number of pages required. At least its a topic I'm interested in.
@Chas and @busannie- Thank you for the information. Ill have to look into it some more.
 

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I'm taking your survey.

In number 7 you asked if there's such a thing as a bad dog. I do believe that some dogs are bad. Some dogs are just too mentally messed but to ever be helped. I do NOT believe that there's such a thing as a bad breed. No breed is inherently bad
 
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