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Breeding dogs is a very big commitment, and should only be done when you are trying to better the breed. Both parents should be health tested especially for things their breed is known for having. There can also be a lot of complications that can ocur during the breeding process, gestation, birth and further on in the puppies and parents life that you need to be prepared for.
Do you know anything about the woman's dog? What is your purpose for wanting to breed your dog? What will you do if you cant find homes for the puppies? Are you prepared for the cost of health tests, possible complications and puppy raising? Has your dog ever competed in shows, or dogs sport? Do you know the common health issues found in your dogs breed? Do you know if its common for your dogs breed to have to have a c section? Do you know your dogs or the womans dog lineage and the health of the lineages? Are your prepared to be responsible for the health of your dog and the puppies? Do you know or trust this woman?
Theres a lot more then just throwing together a male and female dog when it comes to breeding and shouldn't be taken lightly. Don't do it just because.
 

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Well first things first, why did some lady just randomly ask you if you were interested in breeding? And if you were to be a breeder, what would your goals be in breeding dogs?

I could go into all the details of how the dogs breeding cycle works and costs involved with doing things the right way, but honestly most people asking these sorts of questions to strangers on the Internet either give up on it when the realize it's a bad idea or just do whatever they want anyways regardless of the information provided. If you are truly interested in breeding the right way then it would help if we knew more about you and your dog experience and your goals for becoming a breeder.
 

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Oh its not gonna be a constant thing, just once before they both get fixed. we met her a couple of times when we go to petsmart and she told us if we're interested because our dogs look so alike and was wondering if we were interested because she was going to get her dog spayed the day after but that if we're interested that she won't and we said yes cause would like our polar to have a pup.
 

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You are unlikely to find anyone here who is going to condone this type of breeding or look to be helping someone looking to do this type of breeding.

Since he's a dog and not a bitch, I won't go into the specifics of the danger of death of the bitch, but do consider that bitches die in labor and sometimes need C sections- you're not likely to be financially responsible for the costs of this but if a bitch does die in labor then the puppies will need almost 'round the clock care for several weeks. What happens if this comes to pass and the bitch's owner doesn't want to/ can't keep the litter. Will you take them in? Will you let them be sent to a rescue?

Owning the sire of a litter skirts a lot of the cons about the cost and risks of breeding, and also means you may bear no responsibility for the puppies or their placement, but you are still bringing an entire litter of puppies into the world. Your dog is not having one puppy- he would be having a litter.

You have a husky mix, correct? That's a fairly large litter- for dogs that size litters are usually 5-8, but they may also be closer to 10 or 13 if they are a very large litter. That's 5 to 13 homes you're going to have to find. Right now, there are A LOT of BYB/poorly bred Husky/Husky-looking mixes being bred, because huskies have become a very popular breed for people to get. Often, those people are getting them because they look very cool, but realistically they are not a breed most people would do well with- they're loud and very vocal, they have a lot of energy, and they need a certain type of owner in order to skirt the behavioral problems that can plague the breed- ie, one that adequately physically and mentally exercises them and spends the time to train them well in obedience and manners. There are likely more huskies than their are fitting homes for them, IMO, and a lot of the people getting huskies from BYBs are people who are VERY ill suited to have them- they're VERY popular with the people my age (early 20's/graduating or just graduated college) right now, and most of the people I see getting them are not people who will do well with a husky long-term if they have the energy typical of the breed.

Depending on you dog's age (if I'm remembering your other posts correctly he can't be much more than a year), you have very little health and temperament information about him. He could end up with a terrible health problem like hip or elbow displasia, not uncommon in Huskies. He could develop temperament issues later in life- commonly dogs will have rapid shifts towards reactivity without any kind of stressful provocation around a year or two years of age after having perfectly level temperament before, ending up very dog aggressive or stranger reactive.

Unless you know the health history of the parents (as in, detailed medical files, not just verbal assurance that "they're very healthy") and information about their capabilities (as in, they were proven in some aspect of dog sports or hunting or herding, or even confirmation), and also have waited until a reasonable age (2 years, at least) and have health testing done for breed-specific issues and have titled/proven the parents in some way, it is not my opinion that any dog should be bred. They should be bred only if they are actually good representations of their type/breed/purpose and because they have been independently evaluated as being extraordinary in some way.
 

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This is a horrendously BAD idea. You know nothing about breeding dogs, nothing about your dog's or the other's genetic history, nor her temperament. You've just decided to make this choice on the fly because of this stranger you met at a pet store. Also, what kind of dogs are they? Where did you get them? If you live in the same area there is even the possibility they are siblings or somehow related and you would be inbreeding! I had that happen with my uncle's dog and his son's friend said he looked so much like her dog, who did turn out to be his littermate adopted from the same shelter.

There are millions of dogs put to death every year just because people don't want them. Not only that, but there are cases in which a female who does not want to breed can serious injure the male dog's penis, and I'm sure you don't want that to happen to your dog. Even if it's "just one litter" that's putting 4-10 dogs out of a chance of being adopted in other situations and probably put to death. If you've had to sit in a room and discuss whether or not a dog should die, and then look into a dog's eyes before s/he happily trots down the hall for a lethal injection you know what a bad idea this is.

Please get your dog neutered, breeding can open up a huge can of worms you will regret, and you can't put the puppies back
 

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Before you make a final decision to breed your dog go to a shelter and see all the dogs and puppies that need homes, some that may look very similar to your dog. After you do that please sit down and think about how some of the puppies you bring into the world, or some of those puppies puppies will very likely end up at the shelter and if it's a high kill shelter will most likely be euthanized.

The sad fact is that even if you or the woman let the puppies go with a contract saying that the dog must be returned to you if the new owner cannot keep it for any reason some of the dogs will end up at the shelter, some will be bred and some of those puppies will end up at the shelter. It happens to reputable breeders of pure bred dogs and it will happen to you.

If you want another puppy go to the shelter, or a rescue, there's lots of puppies in need of homes, some will look like your Polar, some will be incredible similar in temperament.
 

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Please read this thread, especially the second post:

http://www.dogforum.com/new-additions/puppy-mills-pet-stores-back-yard-11761/

Yesterday, a man showed up at my local animal shelter with three adult female dogs. One had a litter of 7 puppies; the other two dogs were pregnant. All ten dogs are at risk of being euthanized. If the two pregnant dogs are not euthanized, then most likely their puppies will be aborted.

Here's how backyard breeding compounds animal suffering in a very real way. The mother dog with the seven puppies is three years old. The two pregnant dogs are her daughters. Here are their stories:

https://www.facebook.com/savingcars...1850219654287/612771212228850/?type=2&theater

https://www.facebook.com/savingcars...1850219654287/612753922230579/?type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/savingcars...1850219654287/612768705562434/?type=2&theater

Casually meeting someone at a pet store who wants to hook up your dog to hers is a completely ridiculous and irresponsible way to bring puppies into this world.

Now maybe, you're thinking that you don't have a black pit, like the dogs in the links I posted, but my animal shelter has any number of dogs in similar circumstances - huskies, poodles, malteses, GSDs, and so on.
 

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So today a lady asked if we were interested in breeding
So we said yes and was wondering how does breeding dogs go about ?
If you have to ask that, you don't need to be breeding. The only reasons to breed would be that both dogs have proven themselves with titles from competition, and have had all the required genetic health testing done. Otherwise, breeding these two would just add to the already huge population of unwanted shelter dogs. Because that's very likely what will happen to the puppies at some point in their futures.

Please, be responsible and don't.
 

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Oh its not gonna be a constant thing, just once before they both get fixed. we met her a couple of times when we go to petsmart and she told us if we're interested because our dogs look so alike and was wondering if we were interested because she was going to get her dog spayed the day after but that if we're interested that she won't and we said yes cause would like our polar to have a pup.
Before you do this I beg you to read this:

https://www.craigslist.org/about/best/aus/960931196.html?lang=en&cc=us
 

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Good breeders always take back the puppies under any circumstances. They take responsibility of all of the dogs they sell for the life of the animals. Are you prepared to take on this responsibility? Is the woman you met at the pet store? If she's approaching strangers at a store to find a stud for her dog, I can't imagine that she is.

It's heartbreaking to know that dogs across this country are going to be euthanized this weekend. My local shelter has well over 150 dogs at the moment, and dozens will come in as the fireworks start exploding. Too many of these dogs are going to die.
 

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I am another who is against this sort of breeding.

I own a wonderful GSD, good hips and elbows, wonderful pedigree and a beautiful temperament. I had her spayed for two reasons, first she has long pasterns amd this leads to splayed toes. Secondly and the most valid is that I was not in the position to take back any pups I bred from her.

As others have all said, there are way to many dogs being euthanised or spending way to long in shelters.

Please do not add to the problem.
 

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Chances are you're about to do exactly what your pup's parents owners did. If every unfixed dog owner thought, "I'll just breed them once and then fix them" then the dog death count would be so much higher than it already is. Why do you think shelters require the dog to be fixed when you adopt it? Because they're tired of killing dogs.
Remember that every home that takes in a backyard bred puppy is one less home for a shelter dog.
And if that's not enough to think about, even if you do find homes for all the puppies, they more than likely won't be the right ones. Many people see puppies, any puppy, and just take it but don't have in mind the future training and work you have to put into raising a dog - especially one as independent and energetic as a husky. They'll get destructive and chew/dig/jump/pull if they aren't properly exercised or stimulated. They need a big enough fenced in area where they can't escape because they're runners. The one-two years is when they typically get abandoned, some owners prefer to just tie their dog outside so they don't have to deal with it or will just flat-out surrender it to the shelter because they weren't prepared for the puppy to actually grow up and get that big. Do you want that to be the fate of your puppies? Are you able(in every meaning of the word - financially, physically, mentally) to take back the puppies if the owners decide they're too much to handle? They're hard to train because they're smarter than you and stubborn, and if the owner gives no reason to be respected, then they don't see any reason to give it. There's a reason they're one of the more common dogs you see in the shelter. They're not first-time dogs, but unfortunately many people's first-time dogs come as free or cheap puppies.
Basically, just remember it's the puppies that are gonna suffer the most, either by ending up in a neglectful home or a shelter where, even if it were adopted, would more than likely end up back there because it was never properly trained and/or developed health issues due to careless breeding.

Be a smart dog owner, you wouldn't want your own pup to end up dead on a cold table, so why risk it happening with his puppies? Please neuter your dog and advise the woman to do the same. Leave the breeding to the professionals.
 
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I'm wondering if the OP's post was even serious, or was simply an attempt to troll. While lots of people do breed dogs for the wrong reasons, the question about dog breeding and how it is done seemed just a little too naive.
 

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I'm wondering if the OP's post was even serious, or was simply an attempt to troll. While lots of people do breed dogs for the wrong reasons, the question about dog breeding and how it is done seemed just a little too naive.
Personally I don't think any question about dogs is too naive, especially involving something like breeding where there can be some confusion and concern. They wanna create a whole new set of lives, I'd be worried if they didn't try to research it first. It shows they may be trying to be responsible. They also might not be asking how to breed, but may be more likely to mean, who keeps the puppies and what responsibility does the owner of the sire have.
But if this was a troll, then at least it's a good source for anyone else considering breeding their dogs just for the sake.
 

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i wonder if op is still reading this, i'm afraid he had already made up his mind before posting and came here just looking for validation/advice.
 

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I'm wondering if the OP's post was even serious, or was simply an attempt to troll. While lots of people do breed dogs for the wrong reasons, the question about dog breeding and how it is done seemed just a little too naive.
I'm thinking troll too. If you even read just a few of the threads here, most people would understand that most of us are against irresponsible breedings/breeders.
 

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I'm thinking troll too. If you even read just a few of the threads here, most people would understand that most of us are against irresponsible breedings/breeders.
Could be why they haven't been back. They realize how wrong the idea is, and they can't say anything back about it.
 
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