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Discussion Starter #1
I posted a while ago about my elderly dog's behavior problems. Sadly, in January, he had to be put down. He was 15. I'm not ready for a new dog yet but I am trying to gather information. I have contacted several breeders to obtain information and have received 0 replies.
I'm trying to be responsible by obtaining as much information as possible, so that another dog doesn't end up in a shelter or rescue. I would think "reputable" breeders who are dedicated to improving the breed and trying to ensure that their dogs are placed into the most compatible homes, would appreciate my efforts. Instead, they are aloof and arrogant. So, unless I actually fill out a form to purchase a dog, I will continue to be ignored?

Does anyone have any advice?
 

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Just Keep on trying. Sometimes it thakes time to find a good breeder, and a good breeder will answer you.
How do you contact the breeders? Email? Phone? What do you tell them first?
You could also go to a show and talk with them directly.

May I ask in which breed your are interested?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm contacting by email and telling them that I have an interest in this dog breed and would like to obtain more information, and, possibly have an opportunity to meet them and their dogs. I also ask if they can refer me to anyone, who might be willing to speak to me. It's more eloquent than that but that's the gist.
 

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When I was looking for a dane I contacted a few breeders. I didn't hear back from all, but did most. Some took a long time to get back to me, one was over a month later. Just keep trying, you'll get some replies.
 

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I probably tried contacting about 8 different Aussie breeders before I got Aayla. I only got responses from 3. One didn't sound like a reputable breeder (pretty told me to come and pick up a pup by that week), then the other two were helpful, though they took 2-4 weeks to respond. One I liked better and had a litter in my time frame. Then I got Aayla.

The other 5 never got back to me. I ended up finding that most prefer the calls and to be talked to in person then emails.
 

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Sometimes breeders have an exact idea how the new homes for their puppies should be. Maybe you write something that breeders don't like.

As an example, when I got my dog, I was just "thrown from School", I had no apprenticeship, no job, was 21 and lived with my parents. No breeder would someone like me then give a puppy, especially not an Akita ;)
But we didn't talk much on the phone, I went there and then we talked. During this meeting the breeder realised that I would do everything for my dog and that I would train and work with it. She knew that I would do everything to find a good solution with dog/work/flat. She never regretted that she gave this puppy to me. BUT if I had explained my situation on the phone I probably would never have got this great dog.

Try to find you what breeders expect, sometimes you can see in on websites. If you are interessed in Australian Sheperds you could go to an Agility Meeting or something like that and talk with ownters, maybe they can recommend you a breeder.
 

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How long has it been since contacting them? And who have you contacted? Aussies aren't a rare breed and some of us may be able to direct you towards a breeder for help. What are the other breeds your considering?
 

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I would suggest (like others have) going to some dog shows and sports events to inquire. It might also be a good idea to contact your local Aussie club. In terms of filling out a "pre-purchase" form, yes sometimes that is required. That's a screening tool many breeders use and if you're not filling that out that might not even bother to read an e-mail, or just assume you're not serious. So if you come across a breeder that has a form, you should fill it out. When looking into a breeder last year I filled out a form and she did respond. Other times when I e-mailed though, she did not. Unfortunately there are a number of breeders--especially show breeders, who can be very snobby and downright rude. But there are plenty of nice ones as well, and with this breed you might look into working lines as well.

Plus, if you would consider it there are a number of young, pure Aussies that are in rescues, usually because they're so high energy many people can't handle them once they reach puberty and turn them into shelters. And a number of them are deaf, but that's a big challenge to take on.

Regardless of where you seek out a dog, I wish you the best of luck. Keep us updated!
 

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i'd try another strategy.
as long as you search just information about the breed, I'd start with reading the breed's standard and try to find owners in my area that live with such a dog.
For Sheltie and Aussie perhaps going on a dog sport event would give you the possibility to see the dogs in actions and ask questions.

After you educated yourself and if you still like the breed, contact your country's breeding club for the respective breed.
By phone. Not by email.
Ask them for an appointment when they have time to answer your in-depth questions according breeding, health-checks, typical health or behavioural problems.
Tell them hat you want and expect in your dog and how much time, training, effort you're willing to spend daily on your dog and ask them of they think this is realistic for their breed.

If you still want the breed,and they see you as a potential good owner for the breed, ask them for an opportunity to meet with breeders.
there are sometimes sports events or club-intern gatherings, where you find tons of dogs of your favoured breed or they can refer you to breeders in your area.
if you get the contact info for breeders.
I don't know how it is in your country but in Germany, if you want a fast answer, phone's always better. Everyone can copy paste an email text to 20 breeders. Most breeders breed dogs as a "hobby" after their main-job and answering on emails is time they probably to prefer spend with their dogs. they probably filter out the mails they don't see as fitting for their dogs....spending more time on corresponding means less time for dogs ir their family. it is understandable.
if You've got the feeling that they're busy at that moment ask them of you could all them back at a more fitting time.
politeness is key, in my opinion.
make sure to be already as informed as possible about the breed, what to expect of the breed and what you need to provide for a dog of the breed, but be still open for new information by the breeder.
If you the breeder tells you that they consider you as not fitting. Ask for their reasons and reflect if you want still such a dog. if yes, call another breeder: rinse and repeat until you find the right dog. :)
 

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I would be cautious with if not totally avoid any 'doodle' or hybrid. They're still somewhat unpredictable coat and personality wise, and what predictable things I have seen are a lot of hyperactivity and general obnoxiousness. I've also met one that's a therapy dog, but yea. You also have to be careful because you'll find a lot of backyard breeders and millers selling them because they're a fad breed. If you were previously interested in an Aussie I would say Shelties are much more similar to them. Just be prepared for lots of fluff and barks!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's been awhile but I have heard back from some of the breeders I contacted.
What I'd really like to do is find some owners who've actually gotten puppies from these breeders. I don't know if it's okay to come out and ask but even I do, they probably won't refer me to anyone who is dissatisfied.
 

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On many breed specific forums there are places where you can post to ask about breeders and if anyone owns a dog from a specific breeder........... on my poodleforum we get people all the time asking about certain breeders and they generally get good info!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Because I've never owned an AUssie before, I'm hesitant to go to a rescue group. I couldn't handle an adult dog with behavioral problems. I realize not all dogs are in rescues for that reason but I would like the opportunity to be matched with a puppy.
I'd consider a rescue later, when I've had some experience with the breed.
 

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Have you tried looking to see if there are any shows in the area? Confirmation, sport or herding? A lot of the time you can go there and meet with people that have the breed. Not only are they a wealth of knowledge about the breed, what to expect, and if you are a good fit, but a lot of times people there will be more then willing to recommend their breeders or may be breeders. A lot of times breeders don't contact people back because they don't have a lot of extra time and people who usually just email in are just tire kickers who never actually purchase from them. But if you go and meet people, a lot of true dog lovers really do want to talk about how amazing their dog is.

Why the Australian Shepherd? The three breeds you stated are kind of similar (Aussie, Goldendoodle, and Sheltie) but what are your goals for the dog?
 
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Discussion Starter #19
I've been to a couple of shows but I can't find any in my area right now. It seems like if you stay local, the same breeders keep coming up. I found a good website, that you may be familiar with-mypurebredpuppy.com. Based on those reviews, I ruled out a lot of breeds.
Also, I've always wanted an Australian Shepherd. I want an intelligent dog, that's not a big barker/yapper, highly trainable, small to medium sized, friendly and good with other pets. I know they need a lot of exercise.
 

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I've been to a couple of shows but I can't find any in my area right now. It seems like if you stay local, the same breeders keep coming up. I found a good website, that you may be familiar with-mypurebredpuppy.com. Based on those reviews, I ruled out a lot of breeds.
Also, I've always wanted an Australian Shepherd. I want an intelligent dog, that's not a big barker/yapper, highly trainable, small to medium sized, friendly and good with other pets. I know they need a lot of exercise.
When you say you want a dog that is friendly, how friendly are you wanting? I have found that most aussies (unlike @Shandula's Levi) tend to be more reserved and aren't the biggest fans of being approached by strangers. Forbes doesn't mind some people, but when he is done he is done. He will bark. Honestly, of all the characteristics you stated I think a golden/lab/goldendoodle really actually fits what you are looking for. A dog with an extremely outgoing personality, smart, biddable, and not a barker. Shelties can be MAJOR barkers, especially when they are over stimulated.
 
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