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Discussion Starter #1
I’m looking for suggestions for breeds that would fit nightshift workers. Lots of information I’m finding suggests sitters, having family & friends to check in. It isn’t ideal for those who live alone and people you know don’t live close. I understand it’ll be a challenge, but what breeds are worth the effort?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I work night shift now, but I’ll be transitioning into a new career by the end of the year. I wanted to get my pup now so he/she can get acclimated while I can freely take the time off as needed. When I make the transition I don’t want to take off with my new job. My hours won’t be as long as they are now. But the probationary period is 6 months.
 

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I mean... what kind of traits are you looking for? High biddability and trainability? Dogs that like to think for themselves? Couch potato or a dog that will keep you on your feet? Do you have other pets? Do you anticipate living somewhere that may have breed restrictions? Are you looking for a certain size dog? How much grooming and coat maintenance can you commit to?

These are all questions we need to know the answers to before we suggest breeds that would be “worth it” because while one breed may be good for one person, it may be terrible for another.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
im looking for a small to medium sized dog. A companion that I can do everything with when I’m off. Lounge on the couch, go for a run, do errands with. Not too much maintenance with grooming. A quiet dog that doesn’t bark too much, I live in an apartment. No other pets, the pup would get my full attention. A dog that wouldn’t be too difficult to train. I guess by worth it, I meant I’m willing to put my time and effort into a pup, just trying to figure out the right breed for me.
 

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I like West Highland White Terriers. They’re compact but fun little dogs. Lots of life and personality. They’d be happy to hang out with you and be active too. They do have some grooming needs and they are terriers, which means sometimes they can be a bit headstrong and independent. I still think they’re pretty trainable.

I also love Shetland sheepdogs. They’re really smart and athletic, bond deeply with their person, always happy dogs. They can be barkers, but with how trainable they are, you should be able to teach your dog a quiet command. They need a bit of brushing, but it’s not terrible.

I feel like a lot of smaller breeds are either not the easiest to train, are pretty prone to barking, or have some grooming needs. You may have the best luck getting an adult dog from a rescue/shelter. Then you don’t have to worry as much about a puppy needing to go out while you’re gone and what you see is what you get in terms or temperament. You never truly know with a puppy.
 

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There is an important difference between an ordinary guard and a guard dog, which must be understood by all owners of such animals. Guard dogs will bark strongly in order to warn their owner about the danger that has arisen, as a rule, they do not take other actions (although there are exceptions). Moreover, this tactic of a guard dog is justified and effective. On thepets.net blog you can see the difference.
 

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@Kmag15

I'm not so convinced that the day/night rhythm is going to be the bigger problem. It sounds like you live alone and that the dog will need to be left alone at home a lot when you're not there.

I think most breeds will probably adopt similar sleeping rhythms to yours but you don't want to get a dog (like a shepherd) that will go stir-crazy if it gets bored. To my mind, maybe something like a French Bulldog might be suited to your lifestyle because they're fairly small, they're smart, affectionate and adaptable and don't mind being left alone while you're at work. Also, they're easier than some breeds for dialing in the amount of exercise you give it to some extent.

I'd google that if I were you. In your case, as a general tip, I would avoid highly active "working" breeds just because they will have trouble with being left alone as much as I suspect you will need to do.

Good luck.
 

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Temperament and energy level are going to be key factors regardless of breed. I'd suggest that you consider adopting an adult dog from a rescue agency if possible. I would certainly steer you away from a puppy or young dog. My biggest concern would be separation anxiety. Some dogs will settle in and sleep while their owners are gone while others can't tolerate being left alone.
 

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In young dogs, so-called harmless noises are often recorded, which disappear as the animal grows up, usually at the age of 6 months. This is a normal occurrence. they can change the intensity when changing the position of the body of the animal. The intensity refers to soft noise. However, harmless noises can occur in dogs of large and giant breeds. In any case, you need to visit a professional veterinarian. Only he can understand what the problem is. Physiological noise occurs in trained, sporting dogs, as well as a decrease in blood viscosity.
 
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