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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking at Australian Shepherds. I researched LOTS of breeds and believe I might have ruled some out too quickly.

I read that Collies are very sensitive and don't deal with yelling or tension well. I also read that they tend to have separation anxiety. Can Collie owners tell me if there is validity to any of this?
 

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Collies and aussies are two VERY smart, VERY energetic breeds that are prone to a few specific problems, from all the issues I have seen:

-Leash Reactivity (to cars, humans, dogs)
-Resource guarding
-Fear aggression
-Obsessive-compulsive behaviors

I'm inclined to think that most trouble that happens while these breeds are home alone is due to boredom rather than true separation anxiety.

Most of the time, all of these issues can be headed off if you prepare for puppyhood with plenty of research and diligent use of the puppy socialization window. The other thing that collies REALLY need is ample stimulation. Borders and aussies both, in my opinion, are a "lifestyle" dog. They really don't thrive unless dogs and dog training are your hobby in one way or another-- either an organized sport like agility, or herding, or independent trick-training.
 

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My 5 year old rescue BC mix has leash reactivity to other dogs on walks.

She is very sensitive to sounds and gets upset easily.

I'd have to agree with the above too :)
 

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There was an aussie that came to a daycare I worked at who was very reactive on leash and he could never be unsupervised because of guarding tenancies. However, we had an Aussie growing up who was the most laid back, easy going dog ever. He was patient towards kids, great around other dogs and animals in general, and very affectionate and accepting. So, obviously be aware of breed traits, but also understand that individuals may be different. Possibly look into breed specific rescues where you can adopt an adult that has already matured. We found ours abandoned and tied up to a fence all day and he was around 1-2 years old. His only vices were fence jumping and car chasing, but those didn't happen much after the first year we had him. We also had a german shepherd at the time, so I'm not sure the aussie was any more difficult.

 

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We had Collies (rough) when I was younger. I would agree with the statement that they are sensitive dogs.

It's not a bad thing. They're very bright and really, what need is there to yell at your dog anyway? That sensitivity manifests into a really awesome loyalty, IMO.

As for separation anxiety, we never had issues other than boredom (even with my super sensitive Sheltie).

I love Collies. I love Aussies. It's hard for me to say which is "better" but I do think my next dog will be a collie.

Have you tried spending time around each breed to see which traits you like better?
 

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I have had rough collies for over 20 years. I have had personalities that have ranged from very confident to shy. Most have been in the middle. They are a breed that is intelligent and easy to train. They love to work with their people. Stephanie breeds lovely collies that are healthy with great temperments.Welcome to Kelstrin Collies I know her dogs personally. Best In Show CH. Donnybrooke's Mallorca "Nadal" this is my Firefly's sire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I didn't mean that I'd be yelling at the dog. The animals in the household don't get yelled at, only the people. That is to say, my parents live with me, and on occasion, there is some yelling. So, that was my concern with a sensitive dog.
 
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