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Hello,
I have kind of an odd request since the dog I'm writing about isn't mine. I've found it in a discussion group about native dogs and their resembling breeds (like CD, NGSD, Canaan Dog). The dog owner just wanted to introduce her dog to the group, wrote something about it and posted pictures. But by what she wrote and how the dog looked, I became curious. Yes I know this is kinda annoying and silly, but I am already jittery about my "idea".

This is the dog:





She wrote that it was found in the forest, alone, not as a stray more as wild dog. It acts unusually - doesn't bark, doesn't wag, if it is pleased, it nibbles on the hand or face and growls. She wrote that the dog can climb (climbed a tree to catch a squirrel) and runs extremely fast. Reacts aggressive to strangers but is very protective and kind to its owner but also hard to train.

Could it be that the dog is a dingo or a dingo dog mix? Or probably a Carolina Dog or Canaan Dog mix?
 

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First, where is the dog located? If it's in the Southern States, it's probably not Dingo, since Dingos are native to Australia. Canaan dogs are native to the Middle East, so while Canaan is possible (because all things are possible), it's not very likely.

He reminds me a bit of my dog. Something about the eyes, and the serious expression. My dog also runs extremely fast, and he'd like to climb trees but no luck .. however, he is incredibly agile, much like a cat. He doesn't bark to communicate with us, but does bark at strangers of all species. He's very gentle with myself and my BF, but does not let anyone else touch him, even though he's often curious about other people. My dog isn't exactly hard to train, but he's quite ... independent. Which means he learns stuff kind of on his terms, and there are things he just won't do no matter the prize.

My dog was born to a feral dog group in Egypt, and I had him DNA tested; a strong suggestion of Basenji came back, which is possible given his birth location. In terms of his behavior, he also shows some Basenji traits and behaviors, though obviously he's got a strong mixture of something else as well.

Its hard to say about the dog you are asking about, without a lot more info.
 

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I don't know. The owner doesn't live in Australia, but she wrote that her dog came from overseas, so.. probably from Australia.

This dog can climb (I haven't seen it, but I believe her) and does bark but it sounds more like short howls (she made audio records ppl. asked for).

What does this dog look like to you? What breed comes to your mind? I mean..maybe it is just gsd mix or something, I have no idea. But to me, it looks a LOT like dingo.
 

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He reminds me of a New Guinea Singing Dog, that's been crossed with a German Shepherd Dog.
 

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I haven't heard of a lot of dogs coming from Australia; usually they seem to come from Eastern Europe, the Midddle East, India and South America. Not saying it couldn't have come from Australia, and maybe it is Dingo - just seems somewhat unlikely.

Also, it's really hard to tell a breed from looks alone. Very experienced people, seeing a dog in the flesh, get it wrong about 50% of the time. DNA testing is more accurate than that, though it's also not 100% reliable. Primitive dog breeds tend to run to type, although with regional differences. There are only 6 or 9 landrace dogs, and they can be a little easier to identify.

Based on looks alone, this dog could be an Indian Pariah dog; check out these pics: Indian Pariah Dog - Dogs we need to know
Gallery

Or an Africanus dog:
http://www.africanis.co.za/images/gallery/botswana-15.jpg
http://www.africanis.co.za/images/gallery/mozambique-04.jpg

Really, your guess is as good as anybody's, especially given the lack of information about the dog's origins. Can you find out from the owner where the dog came from? Also, it's size? It looks about 60 lbs, but hard to tell from a pic. :)
 

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He reminds me of a New Guinea Singing Dog, that's been crossed with a German Shepherd Dog.
Have you seen that kind of dog? I just read that there are about 200 NGSD in captivity, so can't see someone randomly crossing it with a GSD - but who knows? I'm sure stranger things have happened. :)
 

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Have you seen that kind of dog? I just read that there are about 200 NGSD in captivity, so can't see someone randomly crossing it with a GSD - but who knows? I'm sure stranger things have happened. :)

I know a few people who do have NGSD, one used to post on here, I've heard about crosses and GSD is one of them, but I really think it's just people playing guess the breed. For someone to be crossing the breed they'd have had to either broken the spay / neuter contract, or have had an opps litter.
 

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I had a poodle/terrier mix, named Hey You, whose dad was a full blood Brittany spaniel - she climbed trees. So, it's not just certain breeds that do that...some dogs just figure it out on their own. Her mom, the poodle/terrier mix, on her own learned to climb ladders...she would go up the ladder to slides at the playground all the time when I was a kid. : )

I also have an Australian mix who is almost feral, and she rarely ever barks and even at that, it's more like a growly sound...not a growl, but not a bark either. She rarely wags her tail.

I think dog behavior is sometimes determined by the way it grew up and by genetics...and also in just the dogs personality. Just like my dog, Hey You, the poodle mix that climbed trees...and Jaya, my mostly feral dog, who might have been quite a friendly girl if her early years hadn't been lived in isolation with beatings.

Your friend's dog... it could be it has the genetics to be the way it is, but it also might just be a product of it's upbringing. It's good though that he's no longer having to take care of himself...and has someone in his life to help him out. It can be tough sometimes owning a dog that isn't completely domesticated...but it's worth the effort to see them learn to trust and not be afraid either.

Stormy
 

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I had a dog that looked a lot like that one. Her name was Megan and she was the most wonderful dog. The mother was golden retriever and the father was coyote.
The people had been camping in the desert and their dog went into heat. One of the sweetest dogs I ever had.
 

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multigenerational mutt.

There have been studies done of the dogs that live on refuse piles in various cities in South America, Africa, India, etc.

Even though a lot of breeds make up those dogs, in just a handful of generations most offspring are medium sized, with medium length muzzles, erect ears, sickle tails (tails that curl up over the back but aren't as tight of a curl as you'd see on say a sled dog or shiba inu) and a light brown to yellow color.

So I think your dog is probably a street dog, a multigenerational mutt mix who through selective pressure to survive as a pariah, ends up in that 'classic' structure.

Regarding the other suggestions of being part dingo, part new guinea singing dog, part coyote, etc, all very very unlikely imho.

This goes back to the trash heap street dogs mentioned before. Why is it that in such far removed places do dogs after a few generations all have such similar appearance? Theory #1 is simply selective pressure of living off of human trash promotes that medium sized 'jack of all trades' build. Theory #2 is removal of the artificial selective pressure put on dog breeds by humans either for show purposes or working purposes, these dogs are returning to the 'original natural dog state'

Part of what props up Theory #2 is there are certain populations of dogs who have remained feral for thousands of of generations often have the same basic structure as the pariah dog. (Dingos, New Guinea Singing Dogs, and likely the Carolina Dog). These are often called Primitive Dogs because in addition to having a structure similar to the pariah dogs, they retain behaviors that are more similar to wild canines than to domestic dogs, the theory being that domestic dogs for the most part lost those traits while the primitive dogs retained them. These are traits such as digging dens in the earth before giving birth, going into heat in a different cycle from 'modern' dogs, and vocalizing in a form other than barking. (Some people will look at any yellow colored stray dog of the general pariah body type found in the southeastern US as Carolina Dogs, but generally they are just multigenerational dogs while true Carolina Dogs at least in theory are an isolated population of dogs that existed prior to Columbus landing in the USA and entirely separate from European breeds, and who have these primitive traits not just match a general outward appearance)

Because of this different breeding cycle, Dingos, Singing Dogs and Carolina dogs are somewhat less likely to mate with 'regular' dogs than regular dog x regular dog mating, but the real limiting factor is that there are not many of the primitive dogs in captivity (not counting zoos) so it's just extremely extremely unlikely that they'd have a chance to mate with dogs.

Coydog Theory

There are lots and lots of coyotes all over the USA now, in very urban areas. Coyotes are just very good at keeping out of sight. Coyotes have almost zero interest in mating with dogs, they'd rather either avoid them or eat them. The only time there were any real naturally occurring coyote x dog mixes was back in 1920s or so when the US government was actively attempting to exterminate wolves and many coyotes got killed as well. At that time the populations were so light that a coyote or wolf could go several seasons without encountering a mate, and only without any other option turned to wolf x coyote mating wolf x dog mating and coyote x dog mating. (Mating dog with wolf or coyote who has been raised in captivity that's an entirely different manner)
 

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I don't know. The owner doesn't live in Australia, but she wrote that her dog came from overseas, so.. probably from Australia.
I'm not sure where you get that "overseas" probably means Australia, but where the dog came from could be your biggest clue. If the region is one that still has an extant landrace of pariah-type dogs, as many regions do (especially in Southeast Asia and Africa), it could well be significantly of that indigenous landrace. If the region does not have an intact population of native pariah dogs, it's probably a multigenerational mix of many different known breeds. (GSD could be in there somewhere but that's about as far as I'd venture to guess.)
 
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@akoda1 is likely right. This is a pariah dog of some sort. This is essentially the look of a "natural" dog. Untouched dogs who breed naturally with each other exist like this in all corners of the world. So many breeds exist with many different looks and sizes because people intervened, but this is the looks and likely personality of a natural dog.
@bowtiepomsky Not to be rude but there's basically nil chance that one very rare dog and one extremely rare dog got together and had a pup! When you look at what a dog's breed might be you have to factor in the popularity of those breeds in the area in which the dog was born. If this dog was from the middle east, some Canaan would be possible. If it was from PNG, NZ or Australia then Singing Dog would be possible too. Those two breeds are rarely seen outside any kind of rare breed dog show together, so that's why I say this. But you are on the right track that it is a pariah/ancient looking sort of dog.
 
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