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Discussion Starter #1
Breed Buad

Why do people bias against certain breeds of dogs, like some people say pit bulls were "born evil", which is just unfair since pit bulls can be very nice companions, or other dog bias examples is that Rottweilers are very dangerous and should be leashed up in the yard:mad: I believe most of the time it isn't the dog's fault, most of the time the dog gets blamed for the human being irresponsible and making the dog aggressive:mad: What is your opinion?
 

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I think the breed bias is just code for people who don't like the *kind of people* who like pitts and rottweilers. I think it's heavily influenced by people's issues with race and class.
Agreed Augusta, lots of people are just predjudiced against Pitts and Rottweilers:(
 

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It's because people love to look for a scape goat. When something goes wrong they want to blame something. It's not that people get dogs and don't know how to read body language or how to train them, it's that the breed of dog is a ticking time bomb that's just waiting for a chance to bite. They are also to lazy to look up legitimate facts, it's easier to be told what to believe.

Most people cannot correctly identify dogs so anything that has a short coat, square head, and blocky build is a pit bull to them. To the average person most of these pure bred dogs are pit bulls Pick the Pit - Can you find the Pitbull? That means that if any of those dogs bites a person the news report will state that a pit bull did it when in fact one didn't. Those news stories lead the general public to believe that Pit Bulls bite more then any other breed so they must be bad dogs.
 
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It's because people love to look for a scape goat. When something goes wrong they want to blame something. It's not that people get dogs and don't know how to read body language or how to train them, it's that the breed of dog is a ticking time bomb that's just waiting for a chance to bite. They are also to lazy to look up legitimate facts, it's easier to be told what to believe.

Most people cannot correctly identify dogs so anything that has a short coat, square head, and blocky build is a pit bull to them. To the average person most of these pure bred dogs are pit bulls Pick the Pit - Can you find the Pitbull? That means that if any of those dogs bites a person the news report will state that a pit bull did it when in fact one didn't. Those news stories lead the general public to believe that Pit Bulls bite more then any other breed so they must be bad dogs.
I agree that often when a dog attack happens pit bulls get blamed, but most of the time pit bulls are loyal devoted companions not wild evil dogs some people believe them to be.
 

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I agree that often when a dog attack happens pit bulls get blamed, but most of the time pit bulls are loyal devoted companions not wild evil dogs some people believe them to be.

Most dogs labeled as pit bulls are actually my favorite type of dog and that's mutts. They are simply mixes of dogs that happen to have that type of look and are not any more aggressive then any other type of dog. I hate that people view them as evil, and dogs that should be killed on site.:( All the dogs that have looked like what people call pit bulls that I've met have been real sweet hearts.
 
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Most dogs labeled as pit bulls are actually my favorite type of dog and that's mutts. They are simply mixes of dogs that happen to have that type of look and are not any more aggressive then any other type of dog. I hate that people view them as evil, and dogs that should be killed on site.:( All the dogs that have looked like what people call pit bulls that I've met have been real sweet hearts.
I also just absolutely hate it when a mutt that just so happens to look like a pit bull is abused and neglected just because, in some people's own twisted imagination, a pit bull or any dog that looks like a pit bull is evil, and dangerous:mad: I am absolutely on your side with this opinion
 
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well prejudices are never nice and i tihnk dogs are not necessarily easy, but sometimes they have true core in it.

with some breed, I think it is a combination of naive owners that don't know how to deal with a certain breed and these breeds already having a certain reputation of being "badass dogs" and so attracting idiots that try to compensate for their weak self-esteem.

for example the Pitbull.
I love them.
they are awesome, fun dogs, that can be great in families.
But they're not harmless stuffed animals or toys.
To be a good owner it needs more than just "rescuing" a dog, it also means to try to research what this breed and this individual dog needs and try to meet their needs.
in case of the pitbull this means to remember, that they're a highly energetic terrier breed , that has a higher possibility of becoming dog aggressive and showing a certain prey drive.
it needs to get exercised in a way that is mentally challenging and you've got to learn to know the individual dog for while to know if they can be trusted with other animals or dogs.
they're not monsters, but they need the right owner to meet their needs.
rescuing a dog doesn't fit the owners lifestyle won't help the dog or the reputation of the breed in the long run.

Boxers...can be awesome family dogs.
But they're not only clowns, they're also a strong working dog breed that needs work and often gets destructive when it gets bored.
they've got protection drive and in the wrong hands a protective, strong dog can be like a loaded gun.
If a dog of 40-45 kg dog has the wish to do damage, it can do a lot of damage.

Breeds are not all the same. dogs a bred for different kinds of work.
A Yorkshire Terrier has another "work description" than a Kangal. A Border Collie has another job than a Irish Wolfhound.
Breed matters and it is good to be careful around certain breeds in certain situation, when you don't know the individual dog.

I think it is bad for people prejudices about breeds, but it is good when people have a certain respect for dogs they don't know.
people shouldn't try to touch dogs they don't know or let child run towards them...regardless if it is a Jack Russel Terrier (which can be pretty impressive btw) or a Rottweiler.
 

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i just noticed that the's two threads with the same topic opened by the same user.
I'll post my answer in the other thread as well, since it seems the other one is more in use.
perhaps it would be possible to close one of the thread, dear mods?
 

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well prejudices are never nice and i tihnk dogs are not necessarily easy, but sometimes they have true core in it.

with some breed, I think it is a combination of naive owners that don't know how to deal with a certain breed and these breeds already having a certain reputation of being "badass dogs" and so attracting idiots that try to compensate for their weak self-esteem.

for example the Pitbull.
I love them.
they are awesome, fun dogs, that can be great in families.
But they're not harmless stuffed animals or toys.
To be a good owner it needs more than just "rescuing" a dog, it also means to try to research what this breed and this individual dog needs and try to meet their needs.
in case of the pitbull this means to remember, that they're a highly energetic terrier breed , that has a higher possibility of becoming dog aggressive and showing a certain prey drive.
it needs to get exercised in a way that is mentally challenging and you've got to learn to know the individual dog for while to know if they can be trusted with other animals or dogs.
they're not monsters, but they need the right owner to meet their needs.
rescuing a dog doesn't fit the owners lifestyle won't help the dog or the reputation of the breed in the long run.

Boxers...can be awesome family dogs.
But they're not only clowns, they're also a strong working dog breed that needs work and often gets destructive when it gets bored.
they've got protection drive and in the wrong hands a protective, strong dog can be like a loaded gun.
If a dog of 40-45 kg dog has the wish to do damage, it can do a lot of damage.

Breeds are not all the same. dogs a bred for different kinds of work.
A Yorkshire Terrier has another "work description" than a Kangal. A Border Collie has another job than a Irish Wolfhound.
Breed matters and it is good to be careful around certain breeds in certain situation, when you don't know the individual dog.

I think it is bad for people prejudices about breeds, but it is good when people have a certain respect for dogs they don't know.
people shouldn't try to touch dogs they don't know or let child run towards them...regardless if it is a Jack Russel Terrier (which can be pretty impressive btw) or a Rottweiler.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
well prejudices are never nice and i tihnk dogs are not necessarily easy, but sometimes they have true core in it.

with some breed, I think it is a combination of naive owners that don't know how to deal with a certain breed and these breeds already having a certain reputation of being "badass dogs" and so attracting idiots that try to compensate for their weak self-esteem.

for example the Pitbull.
I love them.
they are awesome, fun dogs, that can be great in families.
But they're not harmless stuffed animals or toys.
To be a good owner it needs more than just "rescuing" a dog, it also means to try to research what this breed and this individual dog needs and try to meet their needs.
in case of the pitbull this means to remember, that they're a highly energetic terrier breed , that has a higher possibility of becoming dog aggressive and showing a certain prey drive.
it needs to get exercised in a way that is mentally challenging and you've got to learn to know the individual dog for while to know if they can be trusted with other animals or dogs.
they're not monsters, but they need the right owner to meet their needs.
rescuing a dog doesn't fit the owners lifestyle won't help the dog or the reputation of the breed in the long run.

Boxers...can be awesome family dogs.
But they're not only clowns, they're also a strong working dog breed that needs work and often gets destructive when it gets bored.
they've got protection drive and in the wrong hands a protective, strong dog can be like a loaded gun.
If a dog of 40-45 kg dog has the wish to do damage, it can do a lot of damage.

Breeds are not all the same. dogs a bred for different kinds of work.
A Yorkshire Terrier has another "work description" than a Kangal. A Border Collie has another job than a Irish Wolfhound.
Breed matters and it is good to be careful around certain breeds in certain situation, when you don't know the individual dog.

I think it is bad for people prejudices about breeds, but it is good when people have a certain respect for dogs they don't know.
people shouldn't try to touch dogs they don't know or let child run towards them...regardless if it is a Jack Russel Terrier (which can be pretty impressive btw) or a Rottweiler.
Some should view the situation that a dog is dangerous like a knife, is a knife evils?, only if it's wielder is evil, same goes for dogs
 

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@TrampolineBoxer
I think there's still a difference between a butter knife and a butcher knife or a sharp sword in my opnion.
And a person I'd trust with one I wouldn't necessarily trust with the other.
some people are stupid and cut themself or hurt others, because they fiddle with things that are too difficult for them to control.

And of course there is a big difference between an inanimate tool and an animal that has its own needs and makes its own decisions.
if you do nothing with a knife, it is still a knife, but it won't hurt anyone and won't suffer. If you do the same thing with a dog it can end up with either the dog others being hurt/dead.
 

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It does suck, but many people don't know dogs like we do. And many times there is a legitimate reason behind the bias, so people who don't know much about dogs fall for it. And i agree, many times it's about the people who own those breeds. Pits and rotts and such are often owned by druggies and people of that sort as protection, not trained and are the dogs that end up dangerous. It's a bad cycle.

That said, I can see the reasons behind the bias. A lot of those breeds are more prone to people/dog aggression, because it's what they were bred for. I'm not saying it's ok though.
 

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It does suck, but many people don't know dogs like we do. And many times there is a legitimate reason behind the bias, so people who don't know much about dogs fall for it. And i agree, many times it's about the people who own those breeds. Pits and rotts and such are often owned by druggies and people of that sort as protection, not trained and are the dogs that end up dangerous. It's a bad cycle.

That said, I can see the reasons behind the bias. A lot of those breeds are more prone to people/dog aggression, because it's what they were bred for. I'm not saying it's ok though.

I was unfortunate to live in a town where pitties and rotts were commonly used in dog fighting. People who raised these types of dogs right had to watch them every second of the day because they were so often stolen that the police started to simply advise against ownership rather than try to recoup the dogs. The dogs who were found, 2-6 months later, were often so damaged owners couldn't take them back. It also lead to crazy leash laws and fencing laws to prevent dogs from being stolen and used as bait dogs. This town also banned chickens outright because "male chicken" fighting was so bad....which was pretty tough in a town boarded by mostly farms.

I personally would never own a dog who had the ability to latch as many pit bulls do, but I also steer away from dogs under 20lbs because they tend to be ill mannered, and even those who are raised right are so easy to trip over it's annoying.

The unfortunate thing about pitts is that they are often owned by three types of people ones who totally neglect to train them, train them for an evil purpose or those who are hyper-aware of breed bias and train them excessively and well. Most dog breeds do not have an entire category of people who train them for evil purposes. This makes me extremely cautious about ever walking my dog by a yard with a pitt, seeing one in public or going to a home of someone with one.

I think everyone has to decide what they are comfortable with. I am not comfortable with muscular dogs, this includes pitts, rotties, boxers, and even some types of cattle dogs that are small and muscular. Sometimes I think people shout "breed bias" when for most people it comes down to taste and personal caution.
 

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I deal with this with my GSD mix and many think he is purebred. I have had people yank there kids away from him and ask me why I have him out in public. Rocky loves all people, he's never met a person a doesn't like! My lab/Pyrenees who looks more lab than anything is very stand offish from strange people. Especially when they come running right at her! She has growled at a few people and went after one person(he was high on something). Since she looks like a lab though everyone just assumes she is friendly and will want to be pet. I find it funny most people are scared of the dog that will just lick them to death but have no fear of the dog that might bite.

My sister has a mix breed from a shelter and so many people claim he is a pit just because of his box head. That is the only thing that he has in common with pits. I would be very surprised if he has pit in him! People just see his box head and roll with it.
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@TrampolineBoxer
I think there's still a difference between a butter knife and a butcher knife or a sharp sword in my opnion.
Exactly. Even though I know a newfie is probably never going to hurt me if I see one running towards me I have a completely different reaction as if I see a poodle.

Even most pitbulls I think I could probably take in a fight (not that it's ever anything I'd want to try) but when you're talking about huge dogs >100lbs. I think its normal to be cautious.

Raccoons most likely won't attack you but if they did they could do some damage. Bears probably won't attack you either. Still, the reaction I have when I stumble across a bear is completely different from the one I have if I come across a raccoon.
 

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I personally would never own a dog who had the ability to latch as many pit bulls do.
Thats a myth, pitbulls don't have any special ability to latch other than relatively strong jaw muscles. What they have is a temperament that tells them not to let go regardless of what is being done to them.
 

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Thats a myth, pitbulls don't have any special ability to latch other than relatively strong jaw muscles. What they have is a temperament that tells them not to let go regardless of what is being done to them.
Which would be my definition of "latch"...i don't think that pitbulls are magically endowed with superpowers. The "latch" is both a function of being highly muscular and being terriers. A JRT can "latch on" but one can typically break the hold because the dog is just not that strong in the jaw. Even an Airedale terrier doesn't have the same power as a pit when it comes to jaw grip.

Perhaps I should of said a latch that cannot easily be undone. Either way, it is something that they were bread for and something I'm wary of.
 

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@Esand

they've got a lot of terrier in them after all. :rolleyes:
terriers can be be extremely tenacious.

I think it is normal to be cautious around any dog... but I'd look more on the handler too though.
If i feel the dog owner is a person whose heart it at the right place and I can trust them that s/he's able to control their dog, then the breed shouldn't matter.
I'd still probably don't feel the need to touch dogs i don't know.
 

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@TrampolineBoxer
I think there's still a difference between a butter knife and a butcher knife or a sharp sword in my opnion.
And a person I'd trust with one I wouldn't necessarily trust with the other.
some people are stupid and cut themself or hurt others, because they fiddle with things that are too difficult for them to control.

And of course there is a big difference between an inanimate tool and an animal that has its own needs and makes its own decisions.
if you do nothing with a knife, it is still a knife, but it won't hurt anyone and won't suffer. If you do the same thing with a dog it can end up with either the dog others being hurt/dead.
I guess you are correct, thank you for correcting my poorly written statement:thumbsup:
 
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