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We have 2 other dogs, a 2 year old female Vizsla, and a 10 year mixed male dog, and the puppy(female) seems to be much more attached to them than to us.
We have this puppy for 3 weeks now, she was separated from the mom and dad and 5 other puppies. They were all together in one place sleeping, eating, etc, so I assume the bond was pretty strong.
She is happy to see us, most of the time, but other than that she would not look for our company.
Will give couple of examples of what happened:

1. when we go out in front of our house, you can either go left and right.
Left for her means an open field and walks mostly off the leash, although lately we walk her on leash in this direction also to balance things out.
Right means leash since we go into the village with traffic etc.

She would rather leave us go and she would walk into the other direction. She is not afraid at all being alone, she would sniff around walk couple of hundred feet or more and just enjoy her time. We would look from the distance, she is not concerned of leaving us or being alone. I find this curious since the other puppies considered us to be the essential part, and all the rest were unimportant compared. So they would have rather taken the bad if they could have been with us.

2. she is extremely shy - she knows us at this point pretty well. But if she sleeps and wakes up, she is very cautious when we are trying to approach her or call here to come closer so we can pet her.

We want her to be highly socialized so we take her with us to a horse riding school where one of us teaches. Here she meets kids and a lot of people in general, couple of other dogs that they have there, horses, cats etc..We also have cats and horses, so she is okay with those, although she tends to play rough with cats at home. She would rather be home in general, she is kind of afraid on the way there from car noises.

3. she constantly in 'fight' with the other dogs. They growl at her 80% of the time, unless they are out walking with us.
She pretty much harasses the other two, I assume for play. She play bites them, which is considerably rough, since she has very sharp teeth. She also eats from the bowl of the other dogs. They growl but she always ends up either stealing something or just plainly getting her head into the bowl and then eating.

In short she is not interested/understand in the message: 'go away, otherwise I'll bit you'..

What can we do to make her bond and consider us, me and my girlfriend, the most important to her?

thanks a lot for your help. Please let us know if you have experience with this breed.


ref:Czechoslovakian Wolfdog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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I don't have personal experience about this breed, but I know a fair amount about wolf behavior and with wolf hybrids. Basically everything you described, is behavior much more like a wolf than like a dog. That is generally what people want when they breed dogs back to wolves.

Wolves are shy, independent, and will likely be more "wild" in behavior in terms of interacting with the other dogs. You picked a VERY poor breed if you want one well socialized to people. Wolves and dogs bred closer to wolves generally don't want to interact with people as much. I was always struck by my interaction with wolves and wolf hybrids that that absolutely could not care less that I was there--unlike dogs who were all wags and excited to see a person. If they do bond with a person, it's usually very selective and might be just one person. So, you can try rewarding her with treats or something else she likes for interacting with her, but you are probably never going to have a golden retriever reaction with this animal. This is not a breed I would consider safe around lots of strange children, ever. It's one thing if it's your own familiar children, but lots of strange ones would not be a good idea. In fact I wouldn't even trust a dog like this around lots of strange adults! I would not trust a dog like this with many other animals, nor any strange dogs. This is such a bad breed for your situation I'm almost wondering if you're trolling. (if not, sorry). Why is it you got a dog like this? And how much research did you do before you brought her into your home?
 
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You adopted a wolfdog. You adopted a wolfdog. What you are describing here is behaviour I would deem pretty typical for any puppy, wolf or not. How much research did you do, going into this? These are really not your average family dog, and to expect them to act as such is a little unfair for them. Although Czech Wolfdogs are supposed to err on 'doggy' rather than 'wolfy' in personality, your pup seems like she is either a bit of a throwback in that regard, or not bred to the recognized standard (i.e., the breeders didn't take temperament into account as they should have). So while your girl is technically of a recognized dog breed, I would not necessarily approach her that way!

Don't assume that you can 'make' this dog bond with you. Its not 100% dog. Sure, Czech Wolfdogs are not as feral and unpredictable as some of the more randomly bred wolf/dog hybrids out there, but this dog is never going to act like a spaniel or a vizla or a poodle. I don't mean to be harsh, but you need to deal with it, or send the dog back. That isn't to say that this dog won't bond with you; it will just show it in different, more reserved ways. You need to be patient, refrain from overwhelming her, and let her take things at her own pace (sorry, but that pace may be as slow as molasses! Comes with the territory!)

Just step back, take a deep breath and stop expecting such doggy things of this wolfdog puppy. To do so is to set her up for guaranteed failure. Read these resources:

Wolf Hybrid Awareness Through Education, WHATE
Between Dog and Wolf: Understanding the Connection and Confusion by Jessica Addams and Andrew Miller
Above Reproach: A Guide for Wolf Hybrid Owners by Dorothy Prendergast

And evaluate whether you truly anticipate what you are getting into. Not saying this can't turn out to be wonderful, but you may need to re-evaluate some of your expectations for this lil girl.
 

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I'd separate her from the other dogs for most of the day so she is forced to interact with you rather then your dogs. She's gravitating to what she's most familiar with which is other canines, that's especially true if the breeder was not a good one and did not do early socialization with the pups.

Intervene when she gets obnoxious with the food, in fact I'd feed her separate from them and be doing exercises with her that will prevent her resource guarding her food later in life. Here's a video on one of the games you can play with her https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMNup72dGyA , check out that youtube channel for more videos on preventing resource guarding Here's one on preventing toy guarding https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nyt2WLdQGs

When she keeps pestering the other dogs to play and they've had enough you should intervene yourself and redirect her to play with you. If you don't then sooner or later your dogs may decide enough is enough and decide to attack the puppy.

Your goal should not be to only introduce her to as many people, animals, and objects as possible but to make each experience a good one. You can do that by giving her nice treats when someone new appears, and / or playing with her and helping her have fun when she spots someone / something new. If she's acting scared then that's when you should get her away and try again later when you are armed with better treats.
 

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We want her to be highly socialized so we take her with us to a horse riding school where one of us teaches. Here she meets kids and a lot of people in general, couple of other dogs that they have there, horses, cats etc..We also have cats and horses, so she is okay with those, although she tends to play rough with cats at home. She would rather be home in general, she is kind of afraid on the way there from car noises.

She constantly in 'fight' with the other dogs. They growl at her 80% of the time, unless they are out walking with us.
I can't be the only one who sees a HUGE liability issue here. You have a business with both adults AND children as your clientale. And, at this school, your wolfdog will be in relatively close contact with other people's horses, cats, and dogs.

So, within that context you are bringing in a rather unpredictable wolfdog and hoping that all goes well 100% of the time? Now, your puppy is rather small and relatively controllable, but what happens when she becomes an adolescent? It would take only one bite to cause significant injury to a child, an adult, or another animal. What kind of insurance do you have that would cover this risk?

You simply can't expect an animal that is part wolf to behave like a dog. If I were you, I'd return this puppy to her breeder or at least give up on the idea that she's going to walking the trails alongside a child on a horse. And, look at dogs. Ain't nothing wrong with a goldern retriever!
 

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To breed a wolf hybrid is inhumane and unconscionable and should be illegal. People can never be sure what that genetic soup will produce, but it's unlikely the buyer will get the social, obedient creature he wants.
 

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The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a recognized breed of dog, it's not like what they are doing here in the U.S. where some fool will tie his in heat bitch out in the woods hoping that a wolf will breed with her. It's a breed recognized by the AKC

Czechoslovakian Vlcak Detail

They have their own breed club and breed standards unlike the numerous designer breeds
The Czechoslovakian Vlcak Club of America

Here's what the breed standard temperament calls for
The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is confident, lively, active, tough, obedient with quick reactions, suspicious, fearless and courageous. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak shows tremendous loyalty towards his master. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is resistant to weather conditions, and possesses the capability of great endurance. An aggressive or overly shy dog must be disqualified.


I think the pup is just holding true to breed standards of being suspicious, fearless, and courageous. With good, gentle socialization she'll likely be fine.
 

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Lots of judgmental people in this thread. As rain pointed out, just because the name of the breed is "wolf dog" does not mean that it's a hybrid. It's a dog.
 

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Rain is right, this is not a hybrid, this is a DOG. I would suggest using Vlcak instead of wolfdog as people will otherwise get the wrong impression and believe you have a hybrid, not a dog. As you can see here.

It might be best to think of your pup less as a general companion pet and more as a spitz-type, such as huskies. They share a LOT of personality traits with many of the nordic breeds. They are very independent, and while they can be affectionate they have their own minds about things. You're never going to get a lab's focus on you with a vlcak.
 

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Rain is right, this is not a hybrid, this is a DOG. I would suggest using Vlcak instead of wolfdog as people will otherwise get the wrong impression and believe you have a hybrid, not a dog. As you can see here.

It might be best to think of your pup less as a general companion pet and more as a spitz-type, such as huskies. They share a LOT of personality traits with many of the nordic breeds. They are very independent, and while they can be affectionate they have their own minds about things. You're never going to get a lab's focus on you with a vlcak.
While it may not technically be a wolf hybrid, anytime you breed dogs back to wolves, you are shaving years and years off of domestication. And if a dog was purposely bred back to wolves, even those selectively bred dogs generations later in that dog breed will retain some "Wolfy" characteristics and personality traits.

Regardless if this dog is able to bond well with her owners--which she very well might, it's also very true that their hopes of her being a dog on a horse farm with lots of new people and animals there every day, is not a good idea. There are plenty of other breeds that aren't good with strangers or new people coming around all the time too who are no closer related to wolves either. And it's a fair point to ask why they sought out this extremely rare breed of dog that has a lot of wolf in her. I'll admit I can sound a bit judgy (as can others) but for me personally this comes from legitimate concern. As Susan also commented, a dog like this is a huge liability for their business and danger to their customers. The pup they described clearly doesn't enjoy car rides, or interacting with lots of people or other animals. If she is uncomfortable and scared and generally unhappy, that's a recipe for disaster. It's one thing if a dog is just timid or nervous, but you can't force a dog to like something they don't, just like you can't force a person to like something they don't.
 
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While it may not technically be a wolf hybrid, anytime you breed dogs back to wolves, you are shaving years and years off of domestication. And if a dog was purposely bred back to wolves, even those selectively bred dogs generations later in that dog breed will retain some "Wolfy" characteristics and personality traits.

Regardless if this dog is able to bond well with her owners--which she very well might, it's also very true that their hopes of her being a dog on a horse farm with lots of new people and animals there every day, is not a good idea. There are plenty of other breeds that aren't good with strangers or new people coming around all the time too who are no closer related to wolves either. And it's a fair point to ask why they sought out this extremely rare breed of dog that has a lot of wolf in her. I'll admit I can sound a bit judgy (as can others) but for me personally this comes from legitimate concern. As Susan also commented, a dog like this is a huge liability for their business and danger to their customers. The pup they described clearly doesn't enjoy car rides, or interacting with lots of people or other animals. If she is uncomfortable and scared and generally unhappy, that's a recipe for disaster. It's one thing if a dog is just timid or nervous, but you can't force a dog to like something they don't, just like you can't force a person to like something they don't.
German shepherds were bred to wolves as little as 40-50 years ago. They're not wolfy at all save in prey drive which is rampant in MANY dog breeds. Wolves were last in Vlcaks 30 years ago. Shepherds of today aren't much different than they were in the early 80s.

The pup may be 'faulty' to the breed standard as well, which does not call for fearful or timid behavior. Who knows if it was badly bred. I don't want to blame it on the breed, as the vlcaks I've had the pleasure of meeting (only two admittedly) were aloof at first but very affectionate once they warmed up, and exactly what wikipedia describes them as: good pets IF you like the husky mindset, which they have spades of.

The shyness of this particular pup is worrying for reasons beyond her breed, and like any spitz-type she probably will never be 100% safe around strange critters. That's also a common thing with many dog breeds, and not a vlcak issue. I am worried about people getting hung up on this pup's breed and claiming it's all the wolf ancestry when so much of it is shared across countless nordic breeds. :( The stubbornness, the tendency to wander, the prey drive, the intelligence but difficulty in training, the easy boredom and eventual high energy intensity so on.

Given OP's goal of having a social dog that can go everywhere and interact with everything, this particular breed wasn't a particularly good idea, just like it'd be a bad idea to do with a siberian or malamute.

Edit: A lot of the pup's behavior as described is breed-faulty, which is not good in of itself. It's going to be a challenge for them, I think.
 

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well while they are a breed of dog, as far as I know they still breed in Wolves from time to time.
So I think it depends on how much Wolf is in your dog. I met one, of which the owner said, it was that 1/8th wolf, means one greatgrandmother of the dog was a wolf.

However, even when there's not much wolf in there, this breed is meant to be pretty alloof and reserved. That's part of how they should be.
it's part of their inbred temperament. How they are meant to be.
I think if you want a dog that sleeps in your bed is at your heels most of the time, another breed would have been probably better.

I haven't met many yet, but they all were very nuanced and fine-tuned in their way to communicate ith other, dogs, which was often misinterpreted or not interpreted by dogs of other breeds, which led to conflicts. You should find a safe, good socialized dog friend that plays similar rough to her, and "teach" her the rules of dog communication.
Perhaps one of the Shepherd breeds (Schäfi, Belgian Shepherd, Hollandse herder etc.)could work? they seem to have similiar concept of intacting ith dogs, eventohugh they seem to be less distanced when it comes to humans and their commands.

be careful not to oversocialise her too early, first thing she should learn is that you as human are there to keep her safe and to calm down.
spend tons of time alone with her so she bonds ith you and not only with the other dogs. do walks ith her alone, play with her alone, train wit her alone. No other dogs allowed, when you spend your alone-time with her.
I have read in a breeders website, that this breed is often more bound to a "pack"/"family" as whole than to a single person, that would explain why orientates herself towards your other dogs.
also: Please make sure to protect your elderly dog from the puppy. Puppies can be pretty annoying and even the nicest dog can snap, when being frequently harrassed, especially when they have age-related pains.
 

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This has been an informative thread. Clearly, the name of this breed "wolfdog" and the breed's origin, which I've copied from the Wikipedia article below, give the initial impression that the animal is a hybrid and not a true dog. I'm relieved to learn otherwise.

"After initially breeding working line German Shepherd Dogs with Carpathian wolves (Canis lupus lupus), a plan was worked out to create a breed that would have the temperament, pack mentality, and trainability of the German Shepherd Dog and the strength, physical build, and stamina of the Carpathian wolf."

That being said, I would feel much more relieved if the OP were raising the puppy in a more appropriate setting, such as a large ranch in Montana, than expecting his dog to spend her days at a horse riding school that attracts families.

As a mom, I'd feel comfortable bringing my child to a facility that had a lab or a golden retriever or a rough collie or a springer spaniel. On the other hand, I tend to be wary of Nordic dogs like huskies, which I'd rather admire from a far as they pull sleds across Artic ice. (I was once bitten by a husky, and I can't quite shake that memory.) I would definitely not be o.k. having a cautious, people-wary Czechoslovakian Wolfdog hanging around the stable, even if I were assured that the animal was more "dog" than "wolf." I would most likely look for another place to enjoy horseback riding.

So, I still think you need to reconsider your initial plan. You have to go beyond your own desire for a rare, challenging breed and consider how others in your environment (i.e. families coming to this training facility to ride horses) are going to feel about it.
 

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A poorly socialized fearful lab or collie can and will bite just as well as a husky or a GSD. It's really best to not judge dogs by their breed. I could somewhat understand saying that as a mom you'd feel more comfortable at a facility with a Pomeranian than a Husk, but then we're talking about how much damage they could potentially do.
 

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A poorly socialized fearful lab or collie can and will bite just as well as a husky or a GSD. It's really best to not judge dogs by their breed. I could somewhat understand saying that as a mom you'd feel more comfortable at a facility with a Pomeranian than a Husk, but then we're talking about how much damage they could potentially do.
You are certainly right. I was imagining, of course, a family-friendly, well-socialized lab or collie hanging out with the horses and the riders. That being said, bringing a not-so-family-friendly Czechoslovakian Wolfdog into a setting with families and children strikes me as a particularly poor idea.
 
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