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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

I have a beautiful 9 month old black lab. She is extremely smart and full of energy. I have owned labs since 1999 so I'm not inexperienced with the breed. I have been having a weird issue since she turned 6 months old (spayed) During our walk, at some point she grabs my pants or sleeves and I can't get her off. She ends up tearing the fabric and pinches my skin when she does this behaviour. For about three weeks she stopped and was great but started again. She's a big girl now so I can't ignore the behaviour as she will pull me over or accidentally hurt me. How do I correct this annoying habit? She knows all her commands but one she latches she's overexcited and is in her own world. It's ruining our walk time and I try to keep calm most times but end up yelling like a crazy person at other times and it just makes it worse. I need some guidance. I've never ever had this problem with my past dogs. She is still a bit nippy during play time when she is worked up. I do the time out using her crate and it works but she does it during the next play time. She's not getting it and I'm wondering if I'm doing something wrong. The vet says she's happy but very bossy personality. She gets nothing without working for it either. Any feedback?:eek:
 
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It won't be popular, but I have zero tolerance for any behavior from any species of animal (including human!) that involves physically assaulting me. You have to establish and enforce your own boundaries around ANY living creature, and if you allow young animals to grow up thinking they can push, grab, slap, bite, kick, scratch, etc. you when they're feeling excited, then that's setting you AND the other animal up for a lot of frustration.

I love animals (more than people, to be honest), and I spend most of my time, energy, and resources caring for them. But I do not tolerate disrespectful behavior, and biting you until your clothes rip, your skin is pinched, and you are in danger of being pulled down IS disrespectful. You're not your dog's equal. She and another dog of her age and energy level might enjoy mauling one another in excited play, but you're not that dog. An older, less playful dog would not tolerate your dog's behavior, and neither should you.

To me there is a big difference between training a dog to do things like sit, stay, come, do tricks, etc. and teaching the dog how to interact appropriately with you and its environment. There have to be rules, and the number one rule has to be not putting teeth on you. It doesn't take long to get that message across and establish the expectation of how your dog should treat you. Winston loves to play and has a TON of energy. Tugging with an old bath towel is one of his faves, and he leaps up and grabs and likes to get as close to my hand as possible, but if his teeth touch my skin, he immediately lets go. He knows I don't tolerate it. He also knows my oldest dog doesn't tolerate his physical play. He knows my Aussie, Pete, DOES tolerate it, and as a result Pete gets mauled on a daily basis until he loses his cool and barks/snaps. Winston ignores him, but if I holler at him to stop, he stops.

Stand up for yourself. Ask yourself this. If you saw a human being repeatedly physically assaulting their dog because they thought it was fun, would you blame the dog for retaliating and expressing their displeasure in a negative way? Probably not. We'd all say the human had it coming. So why not the reverse? Dogs learn who they can "get over on" just the same way we do. I see it all the time in human kids. They'll be absolute angels for some teachers and total disrespectful heathens for others. They've learned which teachers they can run over and which ones will not tolerate it. I can watch my own dogs. Winston will not dare disrespect Archie's space or try to engage him in physical play because Archie will not tolerate all of his roughhousing. He still LIKES Archie a lot, and they live together in complete harmony. Pete, on the other hand, is much ore tolerant/lenient with Winston, and so he gets mauled on a near daily basis. Most of the time he's fine with it, but now and then he gets hurt (just because Winston is now bigger than Pete and Pete is getting older). Pete has to express his displeasure, which Winston doesn't really regard all that much because he's grown up playing rough with Pete and Pete never really puts his foot down very sternly like Archie did way back in the beginning.

Biting is a no-no in dogs just as it (and kicking) are in horses in my world. I have zero tolerance for it. As a result, I've never had a dog or horse that bites. They are all very respectful of me. They get spoiled rotten in almost every other way, but that is the one rule I will enforce emphatically.
 

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I use a little pocket sized tug toy to burn off the extra energy on walks. Leashed walks are boring. Google "flirt pole"; it's a tug with a handle, and look for rules of tug. If it's part of training, it's a great game and puts the bitey stuff under control.
I'd quit the yelling--it's likely revving him up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It won't be popular, but I have zero tolerance for any behavior from any species of animal (including human!) that involves physically assaulting me. You have to establish and enforce your own boundaries around ANY living creature, and if you allow young animals to grow up thinking they can push, grab, slap, bite, kick, scratch, etc. you when they're feeling excited, then that's setting you AND the other animal up for a lot of frustration.

I love animals (more than people, to be honest), and I spend most of my time, energy, and resources caring for them. But I do not tolerate disrespectful behavior, and biting you until your clothes rip, your skin is pinched, and you are in danger of being pulled down IS disrespectful. You're not your dog's equal. She and another dog of her age and energy level might enjoy mauling one another in excited play, but you're not that dog. An older, less playful dog would not tolerate your dog's behavior, and neither should you.

To me there is a big difference between training a dog to do things like sit, stay, come, do tricks, etc. and teaching the dog how to interact appropriately with you and its environment. There have to be rules, and the number one rule has to be not putting teeth on you. It doesn't take long to get that message across and establish the expectation of how your dog should treat you. Winston loves to play and has a TON of energy. Tugging with an old bath towel is one of his faves, and he leaps up and grabs and likes to get as close to my hand as possible, but if his teeth touch my skin, he immediately lets go. He knows I don't tolerate it. He also knows my oldest dog doesn't tolerate his physical play. He knows my Aussie, Pete, DOES tolerate it, and as a result Pete gets mauled on a daily basis until he loses his cool and barks/snaps. Winston ignores him, but if I holler at him to stop, he stops.

Stand up for yourself. Ask yourself this. If you saw a human being repeatedly physically assaulting their dog because they thought it was fun, would you blame the dog for retaliating and expressing their displeasure in a negative way? Probably not. We'd all say the human had it coming. So why not the reverse? Dogs learn who they can "get over on" just the same way we do. I see it all the time in human kids. They'll be absolute angels for some teachers and total disrespectful heathens for others. They've learned which teachers they can run over and which ones will not tolerate it. I can watch my own dogs. Winston will not dare disrespect Archie's space or try to engage him in physical play because Archie will not tolerate all of his roughhousing. He still LIKES Archie a lot, and they live together in complete harmony. Pete, on the other hand, is much ore tolerant/lenient with Winston, and so he gets mauled on a near daily basis. Most of the time he's fine with it, but now and then he gets hurt (just because Winston is now bigger than Pete and Pete is getting older). Pete has to express his displeasure, which Winston doesn't really regard all that much because he's grown up playing rough with Pete and Pete never really puts his foot down very sternly like Archie did way back in the beginning.

Biting is a no-no in dogs just as it (and kicking) are in horses in my world. I have zero tolerance for it. As a result, I've never had a dog or horse that bites. They are all very respectful of me. They get spoiled rotten in almost every other way, but that is the one rule I will enforce emphatically.
This is the best response I've gotten or found online. I know it's my fault because I backdown a lot and try to get her home asap, so many people are around watching so I don't know exactly what I should do. It's very embarrassing now as she's getting big and it looks like she's attacking me. I've even had to grab her lip to pinch it on her tooth to pry her open. She does let go but comes back at me. Can you pm me some suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I use a little pocket sized tug toy to burn off the extra energy on walks. Leashed walks are boring. Google "flirt pole"; it's a tug with a handle, and look for rules of tug. If it's part of training, it's a great game and puts the bitey stuff under control.
I'd quit the yelling--it's likely revving him up.
That worked for a bit, but now she ignores it. I also use to give her the toy after making her sit but then she lays down to play with it and that isn't a productive walk lol I also don't want to train her that she gets something after grabbing me.
 

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That worked for a bit, but now she ignores it. I also use to give her the toy after making her sit but then she lays down to play with it and that isn't a productive walk lol I also don't want to train her that she gets something after grabbing me.
Maybe tug isn't her thing, but it is also possible your 'play style' doesn't match hers. Dogs are excited by movement, including your movement. As long as her teeth are latched on or going for a toy your movement is a good thing. Yelling and flailing around when she bites you, on the other hand, will excite her into biting more or harder. If it hurts you, though, it's almost impossible not to. Hope you find your solution. She's too old and big to be doing this still.
And forgot, for anyone using tug as a training game, gotta let them win or it's not fun. I nearly destroyed Dynamo's tug game, as at first I never let her win as I was told it would make a dog aggressive. :-(
 

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I fostered a dog that behaved very similar to your dog. He was 100lbs + and I was afraid of him knocking me down. He would jump up and get so close to my face that it made me feel very uncomfortable. Your dog's behaviour may not be her playing but being overstimulated during walks. If this is the case I highly recommend not engaging in more stimulating activities such as playing with her or verbal praises. What worked wonders and surprisingly very fast, was having the dog tied to something stationary, like a tree or something. I would bring a lawn chair out and a book or laptop and as soon as the dog began to jump up at me and grab hold of my arms and legs, I simply took a step back out of range and sat on my chair and did my own thing (read a book or on computer). I never said a word as even speaking to him while he was like this made him more excited. As soon as he calmed down I would bring myself back into range. Eventually he learned his behaviour was unacceptable and stopped completely. I did not walk him during this stage as it was beginning to get too dangerous. As soon as he started to behave we started to go on short walks and slowly made them longer.
 

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I don't have time to explain in full right now but I thought this video might be helpful

 
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I've worked with quite a few dogs (several lab and lab x's ) like this now...
What has resolved the issue with clients is a combo of actually shorter walks, impulse control exercises, and solidifying some basic obedience.

The shortened walks helped as the dogs were overstimulated resulting in basically puppy zoomies (the grabbing and tugging). Owners incorporated flip flopping between some obedience followed by sniffing/exploring into walks to burn just as much if not more energy, but decreased the overall exposure to the world. Overtime they were able to increase length of walks back to normal or longer.

And impulse control...
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/impulse-control-calmness-168218/
Lots of exercises in there.
For dogs like yours it's nice to start with calmer food related exercises like the ''It's yer choice'' exercises. But they really make progress when learning to switch from excited play to calm, cool, and collected. Tug games (there's a video in the thread) are great. I love the jolly/settle game (similar to the wild & freeze game video). I intially teach a really solid settle on mat. Then I use it for games. For jolly settle game, I send them to their mat. When they settle (some sign of relaxation such as flipping on a hip, still body, head down, etc.) I release my dog and we do somthing fun and exciting. Might be tug or fetch. Could be a favorite training game. Whatever. Then send them back to settle. I wait for relaxation and then release and do something else that is fun and exciting. Repeat, repeat, repeat. I also play the same game without mat, asking for sits and downs instead.
Another of my dog's fav impulse control games is play with the flirt pole. Similar to tug. Lots of options there as well.

When you first begin these games, you actually need to keep the fun and exciting stuff short and on the calmer side of fun and exciting. The longer you play, the more exciting it is, the harder it is for the dog to gain composure. So start with easy to help your dog succeed and learn the game. Then as she gets better and is making the switch quickly and with ease, increase difficulty by playing longer or upping the excitement level.

Teaching to carry a toy in mouth and redirecting their excitement onto the toy rather than you can def be helpful for managing. Something absolutely worth trying.

Dogs at the shelter... always seems to be the biggest dogs that are like this. Lol
These guys, I just do calm stuff. Some impulse control but lots of time in the play yard. I may hide treats for them to sniff out. I just sit with them. If they come over I massage. No quick petting, thumping, or high pitched talking. Just quiet massage. Help a lot actually as they are always wound up in their kennels. Aren't sleeping well, tons of people and dogs going by all day long. The down time really helps them.

In general to help manage as I work on all the above, I keep petting and interaction in general calmer. Quick pats and excited chatter causes excitement in the dog. Slower, gentle petting and talking causes a calmer response from the dog. I wear tighter fitting clothing. Loose and baggy just gives something fun to grab onto and play tug with alone.

If they to try to tug, I tend to fall to ''be a tree'' (arms in, hands on stomach, head down looking at toes.) Once they calm down, and it has to be approx. 5 seconds, then I calmly praise, raise my head and move hands to my sides. I repeat as needed. I do this because so often dogs like this don't actually learn from ''no!", being pushed away, etc. They may stop for a minute but are often right back to it after a bit. In others it just increases excitement and they come back at you harder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've worked with quite a few dogs (several lab and lab x's ) like this now...
What has resolved the issue with clients is a combo of actually shorter walks, impulse control exercises, and solidifying some basic obedience.

The shortened walks helped as the dogs were overstimulated resulting in basically puppy zoomies (the grabbing and tugging). Owners incorporated flip flopping between some obedience followed by sniffing/exploring into walks to burn just as much if not more energy, but decreased the overall exposure to the world. Overtime they were able to increase length of walks back to normal or longer.

And impulse control...
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/impulse-control-calmness-168218/
Lots of exercises in there.
For dogs like yours it's nice to start with calmer food related exercises like the ''It's yer choice'' exercises. But they really make progress when learning to switch from excited play to calm, cool, and collected. Tug games (there's a video in the thread) are great. I love the jolly/settle game (similar to the wild & freeze game video). I intially teach a really solid settle on mat. Then I use it for games. For jolly settle game, I send them to their mat. When they settle (some sign of relaxation such as flipping on a hip, still body, head down, etc.) I release my dog and we do somthing fun and exciting. Might be tug or fetch. Could be a favorite training game. Whatever. Then send them back to settle. I wait for relaxation and then release and do something else that is fun and exciting. Repeat, repeat, repeat. I also play the same game without mat, asking for sits and downs instead.
Another of my dog's fav impulse control games is play with the flirt pole. Similar to tug. Lots of options there as well.

When you first begin these games, you actually need to keep the fun and exciting stuff short and on the calmer side of fun and exciting. The longer you play, the more exciting it is, the harder it is for the dog to gain composure. So start with easy to help your dog succeed and learn the game. Then as she gets better and is making the switch quickly and with ease, increase difficulty by playing longer or upping the excitement level.

Teaching to carry a toy in mouth and redirecting their excitement onto the toy rather than you can def be helpful for managing. Something absolutely worth trying.

Dogs at the shelter... always seems to be the biggest dogs that are like this. Lol
These guys, I just do calm stuff. Some impulse control but lots of time in the play yard. I may hide treats for them to sniff out. I just sit with them. If they come over I massage. No quick petting, thumping, or high pitched talking. Just quiet massage. Help a lot actually as they are always wound up in their kennels. Aren't sleeping well, tons of people and dogs going by all day long. The down time really helps them.

In general to help manage as I work on all the above, I keep petting and interaction in general calmer. Quick pats and excited chatter causes excitement in the dog. Slower, gentle petting and talking causes a calmer response from the dog. I wear tighter fitting clothing. Loose and baggy just gives something fun to grab onto and play tug with alone.

If they to try to tug, I tend to fall to ''be a tree'' (arms in, hands on stomach, head down looking at toes.) Once they calm down, and it has to be approx. 5 seconds, then I calmly praise, raise my head and move hands to my sides. I repeat as needed. I do this because so often dogs like this don't actually learn from ''no!", being pushed away, etc. They may stop for a minute but are often right back to it after a bit. In others it just increases excitement and they come back at you harder.
Yep that's her in a nutshell. She likes to play "find it" I use kibble and hide pieces around the house after playtime. I did notice she is better when I talk softly if she gets crazy. She knows drop it to when we play tug, I'm working on solid commands. Today she was better on her walk, she jumped at me once and I held my arms above my head and froze while she grabbed my pants. She gave up but this doesn't always work. She's also amazing if we bump into her dog pals on walks and tires easily after only a few minutes. Thank you for your feedback :) I'll keep trying what you've mentioned and be consistent. I've also been telling her to get off the couch the past few days which also seems to put her in her place. Sometimes she shows her teeth and acts bratty which ends her in a timeout or I distract her with a toy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Have her carry a ball or a very favorite toy in her mouth on your walks.

Lol she just ends up ignoring it or lays down to chew on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I fostered a dog that behaved very similar to your dog. He was 100lbs + and I was afraid of him knocking me down. He would jump up and get so close to my face that it made me feel very uncomfortable. Your dog's behaviour may not be her playing but being overstimulated during walks. If this is the case I highly recommend not engaging in more stimulating activities such as playing with her or verbal praises. What worked wonders and surprisingly very fast, was having the dog tied to something stationary, like a tree or something. I would bring a lawn chair out and a book or laptop and as soon as the dog began to jump up at me and grab hold of my arms and legs, I simply took a step back out of range and sat on my chair and did my own thing (read a book or on computer). I never said a word as even speaking to him while he was like this made him more excited. As soon as he calmed down I would bring myself back into range. Eventually he learned his behaviour was unacceptable and stopped completely. I did not walk him during this stage as it was beginning to get too dangerous. As soon as he started to behave we started to go on short walks and slowly made them longer.
we've taken breaks too when she really acts up. Today was a better walk but I have found after 30 minutes of walking she gets crazy. 20 min aren't so bad, and I'll play with her after a short walk. I also do hand signals with her for commands instead of calling them out and she is a lot more calm. It doesn't help that I have a higher squeaky voice lol my husband seems to think this might also get her going.
 

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Lol she just ends up ignoring it or lays down to chew on it.
This shows that you need to work with her on this. This should be a piece of cake for a lab, they are designed to carry birds in their mouths.

I would start pushing with her to build her drive. Will she play fetch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This shows that you need to work with her on this. This should be a piece of cake for a lab, they are designed to carry birds in their mouths.

I would start pushing with her to build her drive. Will she play fetch?
She likes to get what I throw but plops down to chew lol. I try to get her to bring it back but I haven't mastered how to do that yet. I can't wait for her to learn but she's kind of like "Weeeee! I got it! Now I'm gonna eat it"
 

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I know your pain and I can tell you my experience with some of the suggestions that people have listed above. This is NOT an easy thing to break. I have found this to be borderline aggressive behavior and it is NOT acceptable. It is literally reverse abuse/bullying.

My 11 month Elkhound started this behavior about 2 months ago. It got even worse when snow came. I have literally been bitten by him before due to him getting so worked up by something new, such as snow. He used to do this just because he didn't want to go home (if I turned towards the house he would go nuts) but now he does it for no apparent reason.

I have tried staying calm. I have passed the phase of getting nutso in front of the neighbors, screaming and yelling, because I knew it only spurred him on. This is probably the case for you as well! I stay calm now...for awhile it worked, but he has started 'not caring' about the calm and continues to 'attack' the leash, snarling and growling, and me. Sometimes he jumps up at my face and body, teeth out.

I have tried 'the tree' pose as some have suggested, but being a small woman only means that my dogs pulls me over and knocks me down. I have found ignoring the dog only makes them try harder to make you pay attention.

My dog is very good with resource impulse control...and he succeeds in all training tests with impulse control. This behavior does not seem to coincide with attacking and biting while on walks. In fact, I find the behavior insulting due to the fact that we as owners are not doing anything to deserve this seemingly random abuse.

At home he is not allowed on the couch, although he tries to be on the same level as me. He is a model dog usually, highly intelligent, but something about walks sends him crazy within 10minutes. Even if I try to tire him out he still will show this behavior.

Honestly...I would love to know how to fix this otherwise. I am also not new to training dogs, but this behavior concerns me. If you can find a way to nip this in the bud, do it as fast as you can. I am getting to the point that I am going to be sending my pup to a board & train school for this behavior because I simply cannot handle him physically anymore!
 

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I know your pain and I can tell you my experience with some of the suggestions that people have listed above. This is NOT an easy thing to break. I have found this to be borderline aggressive behavior and it is NOT acceptable. It is literally reverse abuse/bullying.

My 11 month Elkhound started this behavior about 2 months ago. It got even worse when snow came. I have literally been bitten by him before due to him getting so worked up by something new, such as snow. He used to do this just because he didn't want to go home (if I turned towards the house he would go nuts) but now he does it for no apparent reason.

I have tried staying calm. I have passed the phase of getting nutso in front of the neighbors, screaming and yelling, because I knew it only spurred him on. This is probably the case for you as well! I stay calm now...for awhile it worked, but he has started 'not caring' about the calm and continues to 'attack' the leash, snarling and growling, and me. Sometimes he jumps up at my face and body, teeth out.

I have tried 'the tree' pose as some have suggested, but being a small woman only means that my dogs pulls me over and knocks me down. I have found ignoring the dog only makes them try harder to make you pay attention.

My dog is very good with resource impulse control...and he succeeds in all training tests with impulse control. This behavior does not seem to coincide with attacking and biting while on walks. In fact, I find the behavior insulting due to the fact that we as owners are not doing anything to deserve this seemingly random abuse.

At home he is not allowed on the couch, although he tries to be on the same level as me. He is a model dog usually, highly intelligent, but something about walks sends him crazy within 10minutes. Even if I try to tire him out he still will show this behavior.

Honestly...I would love to know how to fix this otherwise. I am also not new to training dogs, but this behavior concerns me. If you can find a way to nip this in the bud, do it as fast as you can. I am getting to the point that I am going to be sending my pup to a board & train school for this behavior because I simply cannot handle him physically anymore!
Yeah I need this fixed asap, the last two walks I stopped and crossed my arms saying "off" she backs off a bit better but still try's to grab me. I'm small too so playing tree doesn't always work if she's being persistent. I'll let you know how things go. We are also working on mouthing still, she's being more gentle but fails when she starts getting annoyed.
 

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Yeah I need this fixed asap, the last two walks I stopped and crossed my arms saying "off" she backs off a bit better but still try's to grab me. I'm small too so playing tree doesn't always work if she's being persistent. I'll let you know how things go. We are also working on mouthing still, she's being more gentle but fails when she starts getting annoyed.
Alright....so I actually may have fixed my issue. I have an older thread "11 month old puppy aggressive on the leash" that may have some good back story on what worked and what didn't for me if you are interested in reading that.

I decided that since my puppy gets enough exercise during the day on his walks (he is a moderate energy dog, gets tired after running around for 10min) there must be some issue with mental stimulation / play at home. For the past few days, I have literally had no issue walking him. I'm almost to the point where I don't dread going outside with him!

Here is what I tried:
*5 minutes of mental stimulation- basically did the run of the mill commands around the house with a few treats "Sit, stay, lay down, stay, come here, sit, shake, touch, lay down, etc." just to get him in a thinking mindset during the day. He loves it and it doesn't take a long time!

*Tug-of-War and Release: I think this is the most crucial. I basically gave him an outlet for his mauling urges! We play ToW vigorously and he gets into his killing strike mode, shaking the rope like mad. I make a noise that he associates with 'stop' such as 'Ah, Ah' signifying that he now needs to let go and give the rope to me. When he drops it into my hand, I praise him and then say "Play!" and reward him with more ToW time. Rinse and repeat a few times! I found that it started showing him that he could be aggressive with his toy rope in the house and have fun AND listen to me.

The attacking on leash disappeared after I started doing this. When we get in the house after a walk, he runs to his rope and brings it to me so we can play for 2-5min as a reward.

This may be an issue of mental stimulation at home (5 minutes goes a long way!) and showing the pup when it is appropriate to be wild with a rope....which in their mind looks pretty darn similar to the leash!!

I also found that I should not talk to him on the walks. No excited "Yay, good poo poo" or anything like that anymore. I also do not make any eye contact with him if he stops and tries to stand off with me (this would happen before he would go wild). I act as alpha and ignore him, walking forward with my head up. He just follows me then. I have not had him go to grab the leash in two days already. It has been roughly three days since he has actually just grabbed the leash on a walk and even then he let go immediately when I said 'Ah Ah'."

This helped me....perhaps it could help you? Try it and see what works!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Alright....so I actually may have fixed my issue. I have an older thread "11 month old puppy aggressive on the leash" that may have some good back story on what worked and what didn't for me if you are interested in reading that.

I decided that since my puppy gets enough exercise during the day on his walks (he is a moderate energy dog, gets tired after running around for 10min) there must be some issue with mental stimulation / play at home. For the past few days, I have literally had no issue walking him. I'm almost to the point where I don't dread going outside with him!

Here is what I tried:
*5 minutes of mental stimulation- basically did the run of the mill commands around the house with a few treats "Sit, stay, lay down, stay, come here, sit, shake, touch, lay down, etc." just to get him in a thinking mindset during the day. He loves it and it doesn't take a long time!

*Tug-of-War and Release: I think this is the most crucial. I basically gave him an outlet for his mauling urges! We play ToW vigorously and he gets into his killing strike mode, shaking the rope like mad. I make a noise that he associates with 'stop' such as 'Ah, Ah' signifying that he now needs to let go and give the rope to me. When he drops it into my hand, I praise him and then say "Play!" and reward him with more ToW time. Rinse and repeat a few times! I found that it started showing him that he could be aggressive with his toy rope in the house and have fun AND listen to me.

The attacking on leash disappeared after I started doing this. When we get in the house after a walk, he runs to his rope and brings it to me so we can play for 2-5min as a reward.

This may be an issue of mental stimulation at home (5 minutes goes a long way!) and showing the pup when it is appropriate to be wild with a rope....which in their mind looks pretty darn similar to the leash!!

I also found that I should not talk to him on the walks. No excited "Yay, good poo poo" or anything like that anymore. I also do not make any eye contact with him if he stops and tries to stand off with me (this would happen before he would go wild). I act as alpha and ignore him, walking forward with my head up. He just follows me then. I have not had him go to grab the leash in two days already. It has been roughly three days since he has actually just grabbed the leash on a walk and even then he let go immediately when I said 'Ah Ah'."

This helped me....perhaps it could help you? Try it and see what works!!
I do have her trained with tug and drop it works awesome once we've been tugging for a few minutes, then I throw it for her to chase and she brings back. I'm starting to say good fetch when she returns to me. I also do commands after her meals. I'm wondering if I should play a bit before walks, that might get her too stimulated though lol. Trial and error! We shall see!
 
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