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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a complicated scenario:

My wife and I adopted two young brother puppies, from the Humane Society, before they were a year old. We house- and kennel- trained them early and they were getting along fine. Life was good. About a year or so after we adopted them, they started growling indoors at each other and it quickly escalated to an emergency vet trip for one of the dogs. From that point on, we could not have them inside together unless they were crated.

We crated them inside for a couple of years but it became dangerous for our young toddler who was learning how to free them from their crates. At this point they had reached 100+ lbs. each so they weren't Chihuahuas, by any stretch. After another close call, we decided to re-home one of our sweet boys. We put out an ad and set up a meet-and-greet with the dog we felt would be the most social in a new environment. He stayed for a weekend and it went SO. WELL. The potential new owner asked that he stay permanently and we went through the process of releasing vet records, bringing over familiar toys and so on. He landed on a lovely ranch with 40 acres and a pond.

Fast-forward to the present. I get a phone call from the new owner after four months and she says it isn't going to work out. He had developed SEVERE separation anxiety and was destroying her home and garage and was escaping his kennel only to wreak havoc on anything and everything. I was crushed. I immediately said yes to taking him back because I couldn't just have him be abandoned. However, we are in the same boat as before - full circle. He is back home and displaying the same behavior as before so we have to keep them kenneled while inside.

Here is what I need help with:

I don't believe the danger will ever go away, so I am curious if I should look to re-home him again and explain his anxiety to a potential owner? Or should we just manage the situation as we have before and hope we don't slip up and make a mistake that leads to a fight?
 

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With a young child in the house, I would not take the chance of the two dogs getting into a fight. Just because the first rehome did not work does not mean you won't be able to find a good home for him. What breed is the dog? Maybe you can look at rehoming him through a Specific Breed Rescue.
 

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I commend you for continuing to take responsibility for both dogs, but I agree that you should not try to bring the second dog back home. There's too much risk for you and especially your wife and child if they get into a fight. Besides your toddler figuring out how to open up the dogs' crates, it sounds like the second dog has busted out of his kennel a few times. If you need to collect the second dog, maybe you can devise a temporary indoor - outdoor solution.

It sounds like your dogs developed littermate syndrome.
 

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If you didn't have a toddler I would say to try a rotation first, but with a young child in the mix and both dogs being over 100lbs, I would be afraid of the child accidentally getting stuck in the middle of a dog-battle and getting seriously hurt.

I recommend contacting reputable rescues and giving them a very detailed explanation of your situation and see of they can help rehome one dog. What breed (or mix) are they?
 

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How irresponsible of the humane society to place two litter mates in the same home!

Don't risk anything, find a new home for one of the dogs.

To me, the safety of my family would be the first priority.

Good luck in finding a suitable home for your dog, sounds like he needs an active and proactive owner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Both dogs are a mixed breed. Mostly bassett/retriever, according to the Humans Society when we adopted them.
 
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