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Discussion Starter #1
well Bella is a little better she did cough pretty bad this morning but since I picked her up at the vet at 1:30 she has only coughed maybe 3 times and its 5:15 now which is a huge improvement, They spayed her with 1 tiny incision so I'm guessing they did it scoptic where they don't take out the uterus just the ovaries . I was expecting to see a long incision but when I looked it was really small. She has been sleeping since coming home, hasn't ate but a little chicken that I fed her but she is doing good, I am going to keep her on the antibiotics they gave me for her cough until they run out which I got a 15 day supply of liquid medicine.
 

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they said that's only when they still have their ovaries. It has been proven that there is no health risks with leaving the uterus, as long as the ovaries are removed. By leaving the uterus it's safer and less painful surgery, look up laparoscoptic spay, They don't take the uterus out during that form of spay.
 

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Vets wouldn't leave the uterus when Desexing, if left can cause major infection, and would still be prone to pyometra, (uterus fills up with puss) .

According to vets now, they said that pyometra is caused by certain hormones, Which are removed when the ovaries are removed so there is a 0 chance they will have uterine infections since they won't have the hormones that cause them check out the link I posted. It explains the benefits of leaving the uterus
 

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I must apologize for my previous comment, I have since been informed that it is a procedure done these days , however its not something that is done here in Australia. But have also been told its quite an expensive procedure, as it is performed similar to that of key-hole surgery.
 

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Sorry but that sound like a load of BS to me .
But good to hear Bella is doing well.
Jeez. :/

It's actually not that uncommon in the states, especially for dogs at risk for pyometra. We fostered a poodle cross that was spayed this way after getting pyometra. We were the ones who were in charge of resting her and nursing her back to health, but they performed it as stated and she had a tiny incision. Not sure how much it was because we didn't pay for it, but still.
 

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Yeah its not done here in Australia, hence why I have never heard of it. It just seem so sill to only do a half job , but if the pets do well after that's good.
 

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I think (although I could be mixing things up) that we have another member on here who had this type of spay done. It was hard for her to find a vet to perform this spay because it is really expensive and not widely practiced. I hope I'm remembering the story correctly.

Anyway, interesting that this is the 'go to' method now.
 

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I think (although I could be mixing things up) that we have another member on here who had this type of spay done. It was hard for her to find a vet to perform this spay because it is really expensive and not widely practiced. I hope I'm remembering the story correctly.

Anyway, interesting that this is the 'go to' method now.
If we are thinking of the same person, I think she had the opposite done: took out the uterus and left the ovaries, so her dog could still have those hormones. I could be wrong though :)

It is pretty neat how many different ways they are starting to spay though.
 

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If we are thinking of the same person, I think she had the opposite done: took out the uterus and left the ovaries, so her dog could still have those hormones. I could be wrong though :)

It is pretty neat how many different ways they are starting to spay though.
Hahahaha I think you're right! Oops...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The funny thing is I went to a local dog rescue to have her spayed as it was more affordable so I got it done cheaper then if I would have went to any other vet in my town. It was only 70$ vs. $120
 

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I think (although I could be mixing things up) that we have another member on here who had this type of spay done. It was hard for her to find a vet to perform this spay because it is really expensive and not widely practiced. I hope I'm remembering the story correctly.

Anyway, interesting that this is the 'go to' method now.
That's @cbarkerb724 and I agree I think it was the uterus was taken out but the ovaries were left. I kind of agree with @mrscunnigham, I don't see a purpose in leaving the uterus in. It just seems like 1 more thing that could cause problems down the road. After having a dog in the family die from pyometra, I would rather be safe then sorry.
 
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That's @cbarkerb724 and I agree I think it was the uterus was taken out but the ovaries were left. I kind of agree with @mrscunnigham, I don't see a purpose in leaving the uterus in. It just seems like 1 more thing that could cause problems down the road. After having a dog in the family die from pyometra, I would rather be safe then sorry.
That would be an OSS (Ovary Sparing Spay) some people believe hormones matter ;).

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Discussion Starter #18
well vets have proven that its the hormones that cause pyrometra so when removing the ovaries it takes away the hormones that cause uterus infections. I didn't ask them to do this form of spay it's just the form that they use now
 

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I think (although I could be mixing things up) that we have another member on here who had this type of spay done. It was hard for her to find a vet to perform this spay because it is really expensive and not widely practiced. I hope I'm remembering the story correctly.

Anyway, interesting that this is the 'go to' method now.
Is it? While it's not uncommon I wouldn't say it's common by any stretch of the imagination, ime anyway. That was the only dog (the one I fostered) besides one other - a dachshund that belongs to a friend - that had it done that way. All the other doggies I met were spayed the normal way. (The ones I actually knew about that is)

I do agree it doesn't make a lot of sense and seems like a lot of work for the same outcome, but if it works for some dogs/owners then eh. Whatever.
 

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Is it? While it's not uncommon I wouldn't say it's common by any stretch of the imagination, ime anyway. That was the only dog (the one I fostered) besides one other - a dachshund that belongs to a friend - that had it done that way. All the other doggies I met were spayed the normal way. (The ones I actually knew about that is)

I do agree it doesn't make a lot of sense and seems like a lot of work for the same outcome, but if it works for some dogs/owners then eh. Whatever.
They have started doing it this way because its safer and easier on the dog, its less painful. Instead of basically pulling the uterus out and having to cut a-lot more blood vessels they just cut the ovaries out. The dog heals faster. I've noticed a huge difference in the healing process of Bella compared to my last dog who I had spayed. Bella doesn't ever act like she is in pain as my other dog stayed in pain and it took almost 2 weeks to heal. They haven't found any reason to need to remove the uterus so they just remove the ovaries. They say it prevents a-lot of surgery related complications. Bella's incision is also not swollen at all where as my other dogs had bad swelling. It also makes it a-lot harder for the dog to rip out their stitches since there aren't very much there to begin with
 
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