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Hi everyone, I'm a member of the forum and I need advice. During the quarantine my dog Sissy was unable to take long walks in the park, to which she was used. We have been forced to stay at home for a long time and now she seems very apathetic and lazy, I can't stimulate her with the games she previously loved doing and struggling to pay attention and obey even the simplest commands. Has any of this happened to any of you? Do you have any advice or some new exercise to try? Thank you so much. Love&light, Lisa.
 

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It would be great if you have a backyard or a Terrace.
Stairs are a great way to exercise your dog provided she has healthy bones. Sit in one corner of the room and get a family member at the other corner of the room. Call her back and forth repeatedly (give her treat when she comes to you so that she is not bored). This would serve as exercise as well as good recall training for your dog. Hide small treats around the house so she is busy sniffing them out.
 

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Are you able to walk her at all at the moment? How long for and how far? Do you have a garden? And do you know when the lockdown is likely to be relaxed?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
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Are you able to walk her at all at the moment? How long for and how far? Do you have a garden? And do you know when the lockdown is likely to be relaxed?
Hi Judy, by now I can make short walks around home, unfortunately I have just a small balcony. Next week I will be able to go to the park and I hope it will help a bit, cause at the moment Sissy seems quiet depressed. Thank you for your interest.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It would be great if you have a backyard or a Terrace.
Stairs are a great way to exercise your dog provided she has healthy bones. Sit in one corner of the room and get a family member at the other corner of the room. Call her back and forth repeatedly (give her treat when she comes to you so that she is not bored). This would serve as exercise as well as good recall training for your dog. Hide small treats around the house so she is busy sniffing them out.
Ciao Sara,
unfortunately we live in apartament and just have a small balcony. Thank you for the advice, Sissy used to love sniffing trests around but now she seems no more interested, hope it will not turn into depression :(
 

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You could try to make the short walks more interesting - if you're allowed, and if she's not stressed by being in the house, go out beforehand and sprinkle some stinky treats in any grassy verges, or even just at the side of the pavement. Then take her out and encourage her to sniff. If you can't go out beforehand, then just chuck them somewhere when she's not watching you and see if she'll enjoy finding them. The more sniffing, looking at the clouds, and so on, the better.

As mentioned above, any sniffing games around the home are good too if she'll get involved - oh, just seen your post saying she's not interested :-(

At least it's not for too much longer - try not to let her see that you're worried about her being sad, as that could make her worse. Maybe just let her be down in the dumps for now - she has good reason, after all - and carry on 'suggesting' things she might like to do but not putting pressure on her. And don't, of course, rule out the possibility that she might be genuinely ill (though you probably can't do anything about it right now anyway unless she shows other symptoms).

For what it's worth, my dog seemed to go through a depressed patch when he was around 1. Tests showed nothing, and the vet suggested he was just maturing, but a few months later, he gradually picked up again and returned to normal - people I met regularly on walks really noticed the difference. The vet then suggesed seasonal affective disorder, but he's never shown this again. Hopefully your girl will bounce right back.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You could try to make the short walks more interesting - if you're allowed, and if she's not stressed by being in the house, go out beforehand and sprinkle some stinky treats in any grassy verges, or even just at the side of the pavement. Then take her out and encourage her to sniff. If you can't go out beforehand, then just chuck them somewhere when she's not watching you and see if she'll enjoy finding them. The more sniffing, looking at the clouds, and so on, the better.

As mentioned above, any sniffing games around the home are good too if she'll get involved - oh, just seen your post saying she's not interested :-(

At least it's not for too much longer - try not to let her see that you're worried about her being sad, as that could make her worse. Maybe just let her be down in the dumps for now - she has good reason, after all - and carry on 'suggesting' things she might like to do but not putting pressure on her. And don't, of course, rule out the possibility that she might be genuinely ill (though you probably can't do anything about it right now anyway unless she shows other symptoms).

For what it's worth, my dog seemed to go through a depressed patch when he was around 1. Tests showed nothing, and the vet suggested he was just maturing, but a few months later, he gradually picked up again and returned to normal - people I met regularly on walks really noticed the difference. The vet then suggesed seasonal affective disorder, but he's never shown this again. Hopefully your girl will bounce right back.
Thank you so much Judy, really appreciate your suggestions. I am trying not to show that I am worried, but not always easy. I am searching some new light exercise to stimulate her, will keep you updated about the situation.
Love&Light Lisa
 

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Like humans, dogs are prone to depression. Depression is often caused by changes in living habits, such as losing a partner. Depressed dogs can change both behavior (lack of energy, walking back and forth, loss of appetite) and body language (tail drooping and drooping ears). You need to identify the signs of depression in order to use methods to help your dog recover.
Pay attention to the dog's crouch sign. Usually, healthy dogs live very sociable and happy. If your dog is not excited to take you home (slow, wagging little tail, less moving) or is no longer interested in his usual favorite activity, he may be depressed.
Instead of running to the door to pick up guests, depressed dogs can sneak away or find a corner to curl up and sleep.
You should pay special attention if your dog dodges you. Dog dodging is usually caused by injury, illness, or depression.
Depressed dogs, on the other hand, can follow their owner everywhere but absolutely don't want to interact with the owner.
When looking for signs of depression, remember your dog's body language and his normal habits. You do not need to be bothered if the dog is good but often refuses to stand up and bark at a stranger. However, if the dog is sociable and likes to hang out all of a sudden, he may be depressed.
Depression when you are at home is not a good sign. Lack of care, lazy walking the dog or leaving the dog alone in the yard is a sign that you do not really know what is best for dogs. Dogs are inherently herds, so letting them take care of them daily, weekly, monthly, and even life is considered abusive.
 

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Just to be clear about the last paragraph in the post above, @ReichertCaleb , I don't think there is any suggestion that the OP is neglecting or abusing her dog.
 
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