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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone please recommend the names of good animal behaviorists in the bay area (especially if you've used and found really helpful)? I need someone to help me deal with my dog's increasing food aggression/jealousy issues...:eek:
 

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Make sure whoever you chose has the education and credentials to back up her title. I have a friend who works with a "Canine Behaviorist" and I have seen her resume- she didn't even go to college. I tell her all the time that she needs to find somebody else but I guess she likes the fact that this woman has a bunch of agility titles and doesn't mind, but I think her techniques are questionable.

Force free information:
https://www.wagfield.com/force-free-dog-training
 

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Force free means a trainer who does not use punishments, corrections or aversive methods to train. Force free trainers use positive reinforcement.
 

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Force free means a trainer who does not use punishments, corrections or aversive methods to train. Force free trainers use positive reinforcement.
Actually, Positive reinforcement when it comes to operant conditioning does not have anything to do with a dog having a positive experience, it simply means something has been added (negative means something has been taken away or subtracted).

Personally, I would look for a trainer/behaviorist who uses prey drive training.
 

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Actually, Positive reinforcement when it comes to operant conditioning does not have anything to do with a dog having a positive experience, it simply means something has been added (negative means something has been taken away or subtracted).

Personally, I would look for a trainer/behaviorist who uses prey drive training.
Yes, positive means added, but Grabby mentioned positive reinforcement. As in, used to reward a behavior.

I suppose you could argue that you could add something the dog found aversive and call it "reinforcement" but I imagine it would be nearly impossible, as if the dog found said thing aversive it wouldn't be rewarding and would then be positive punishment.


OP, I agree with the notion of finding a force free environment. My dog is reactive and not really a resource guarder as much, but when I first started working with my awesome trainer it was clear from the get-go that she wasn't going to do anything that made my dog uncomfortable. It made the relationship - between her and Chisum as well as between her and I - much more enjoyable and we've gotten so much more out of the experience.
 

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I appreciate the lesson @Gnostic Dog. I'm pretty familiar with the four quadrants. They all work. I've made my choices about which I feel comfortable for my dogs.
@Cuppybear A good book on resource guarding is Mine by Jean Donaldson. She has another book called Fight. The first one focuses on dogs who resource guard from humans. The second is more about dogs who resource guard from other dogs.
 

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Actually, Positive reinforcement when it comes to operant conditioning does not have anything to do with a dog having a positive experience, it simply means something has been added (negative means something has been taken away or subtracted).

Personally, I would look for a trainer/behaviorist who uses prey drive training.
Could you provide a link or explanation for prey drive training? I've never heard of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
SO I've done several days of research now trying to pick the best dog trainer/behaviorist, and I feel like I've exhausted Google. Now it's just up to me to pick someone from a long list of names!

Has anyone had experience with Trish King, Julie Bond, Jeannine Berger, or Meredith Stepita? I'm also trying to decide whether to go the trainer/behaviorist or veterinary behaviorist route...

Thank you so much for any insight!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
And thank you for the book suggestions. I keep hearing those names over and over again, so probably time to purchase!

You know I never thought he was resource guarding from humans, but he recently snarled during a vet visit (we had to muzzle him and still snarled through the muzzle). The vet had to stop the exam as she could barely touch him. And he also snarled at my 3-year-old nephew when he came upon my dad petting the dog. He seems to guarding people and/or space, too :(
 

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SO I've done several days of research now trying to pick the best dog trainer/behaviorist, and I feel like I've exhausted Google. Now it's just up to me to pick someone from a long list of names!

Has anyone had experience with Trish King, Julie Bond, Jeannine Berger, or Meredith Stepita? I'm also trying to decide whether to go the trainer/behaviorist or veterinary behaviorist route...

Thank you so much for any insight!
What are their qualifications? Do they belong to any professional associations? If so, which ones?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Julie C. Bond, M.S. Animal Behavior UC Davis
Certified Animal Behaviorist
Member National Association of Animal Behaviorists (NAAB)

Trish King, CPDT, CDBC

Jeannine Berger, DVM, DACVB, DACAW, CAWA

Meredith Stepita, DVM, DACVB
 

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Have you tried calling UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine?...they have a Behavior Sciences Service in their hospital/clinic .......board certified behavorists are available.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes, I've been emailing with someone from there. I've gotten some good advice/knowledge. I went to Davis so I know they have a great veterinary science program! However, I'm 2 hours away, so I prefer someone closer. Meredith and Jeannine are veterinary behaviorists and are in Clayton and SF, respectively, so I'm looking into their programs.
 
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