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Discussion Starter #1
Out of curiosity I watched a video on YouTube about grooming show beagles. Why on earth do they shave off their whiskers? Seems cruel to me.

But to my main question. If I were to take my beagle to the groomer would they shave parts of his fur like his neckline, butt, stomach, paw pad hair? I never realized a beagle would have any shaving done. Is this only for show dogs? Do you think this is unnecessary?

Any beagle owners out there, what do you have done grooming wise?

Thanks...
 

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Out of curiosity I watched a video on YouTube about grooming show beagles. Why on earth do they shave off their whiskers? Seems cruel to me.

But to my main question. If I were to take my beagle to the groomer would they shave parts of his fur like his neckline, butt, stomach, paw pad hair? I never realized a beagle would have any shaving done. Is this only for show dogs? Do you think this is unnecessary?

Any beagle owners out there, what do you have done grooming wise?

Thanks...
I work in a grooming salon and for Beagles we usually only shave the paw pads if we see fur sticking out. We do this because there are a lot of burrs and other sharp things in this area that can get tangled in paw fur and be very painful. We would only do a sanitary trim if asked and honestly I would still probably say no on a beagle because that just seems silly its too short to be a problem. I've seen this mentioned a lot lately so I just want to repeat my PSA: :p

No reputable groomer should shave anything off your dog without your permission, no groomer should accept a dog when they haven't discussed with the owner what haircut they want, and any groomer that shaves your dog without permission is not a groomer you should bring your dog to ever again.

But on the subject of people willingly shaving their beagles. We have a lady that we had to recently start turning away that adopted a short-haired Chihuahua and brought him in for a de-shedding bath claiming that if he kept shedding she would have to return him to the shelter. Well apparently the bath wasn't enough because she brought him in every month for a shave down and even though we explained that it wouldn't help the shedding it would just make the shed shorter and more annoying. She kept doing it until we finally had to turn her away because it was hurting the poor little guy's skin. I assume she went somewhere else because she just refused to listen to us. Poor pup :(
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I work in a grooming salon and for Beagles we usually only shave the paw pads if we see fur sticking out. We do this because there are a lot of burrs and other sharp things in this area that can get tangled in paw fur and be very painful. We would only do a sanitary trim if asked and honestly I would still probably say no on a beagle because that just seems silly its too short to be a problem. I've seen this mentioned a lot lately so I just want to repeat my PSA: :p

No reputable groomer should shave anything off your dog without your permission, no groomer should accept a dog when they haven't discussed with the owner what haircut they want, and any groomer that shaves your dog without permission is not a groomer you should bring your dog to ever again.

But on the subject of people willingly shaving their beagles. We have a lady that we had to recently start turning away that adopted a short-haired Chihuahua and brought him in for a de-shedding bath claiming that if he kept shedding she would have to return him to the shelter. Well apparently the bath wasn't enough because she brought him in every month for a shave down and even though we explained that it wouldn't help the shedding it would just make the shed shorter and more annoying. She kept doing it until we finally had to turn her away because it was hurting the poor little guy's skin. I assume she went somewhere else because she just refused to listen to us. Poor pup :(
Poor Chihuahua, that is awful! It really is a shame not being able to talk sense into people about their pets. I have dog hair EVERYWHERE in my house, it's to be expected! We have hardwood flooring and I have to sweep up hair every other day, and I don't even want to talk about our blankets LOL. It's the little things we put up with because we LOVE our dogs!

Thank you for this info. Is trimming paw pad hair something I can do myself with rounded scissors or do they actually have to shave the fur out?

Also, is a de-shed treatment something you do with Beagles since they have a double coat? I do brush my beagle every so often but not sure if I am doing it enough
 

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Poor Chihuahua, that is awful! It really is a shame not being able to talk sense into people about their pets. I have dog hair EVERYWHERE in my house, it's to be expected! We have hardwood flooring and I have to sweep up hair every other day, and I don't even want to talk about our blankets LOL. It's the little things we put up with because we LOVE our dogs!

Thank you for this info. Is trimming paw pad hair something I can do myself with rounded scissors or do they actually have to shave the fur out?

Also, is a de-shed treatment something you do with Beagles since they have a double coat? I do brush my beagle every so often but not sure if I am doing it enough
Yeah he is the sweetest little dog too. We shave out the paw pad hair because its much safer if they jerk around and misbehave then scissors. The de-shed is absolutely used on Beagles! We use a Furminator shampoo and Conditioner and for short haired dogs we use a Zoom-groom instead of the Furminator brush, and to be honest we rarely use the Furminator brush at all because we've found it irritates the dogs if used too much. The weighed conditioner that Furminator has is perfect for the high-velocity dryer we use at my salon because it literally blows the hair away and that's when we get most of the shed out.
 
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Yeah he is the sweetest little dog too. We shave out the paw pad hair because its much safer if they jerk around and misbehave then scissors. The de-shed is absolutely used on Beagles! We use a Furminator shampoo and Conditioner and for short haired dogs we use a Zoom-groom instead of the Furminator brush, and to be honest we rarely use the Furminator brush at all because we've found it irritates the dogs if used too much. The weighed conditioner that Furminator has is perfect for the high-velocity dryer we use at my salon because it literally blows the hair away and that's when we get most of the shed out.
I have never had him professionally groomed or de-shedded! Think I should try it out? I could buy my own Furminator shampoo/conditioner but it sounds like the salon dryers are the key to getting optimum results.. Though I'm sure my beagle would be absolutely terrified of it - is it loud?

Do you notice a big difference in the coat after the de-shed treatment?

How do salon dryers not dry out a dog's coat?

Thanks for your time answering my questions :) it's nice to get answers from someone that is a groomer!
 

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I have never had him professionally groomed or de-shedded! Think I should try it out? I could buy my own Furminator shampoo/conditioner but it sounds like the salon dryers are the key to getting optimum results.. Though I'm sure my beagle would be absolutely terrified of it - is it loud?

Do you notice a big difference in the coat after the de-shed treatment?

How do salon dryers not dry out a dog's coat?

Thanks for your time answering my questions :) it's nice to get answers from someone that is a groomer!
No problem! I enjoy finding threads on the site that I can help with! :) I am considered a bather not a groomer, the big difference is that I don't do hair-cuts. I can shave a sanitary area and paw pads and I do bathes, teeth brushing, anal gland expression, nail grinding and trimming and basically anything you'd expect from a groom besides a haircut. I get my own customers which are usually short-haired or double coated dogs who wouldn't benefit from a haircut.

I love the results we get with the de-shed treatment and I totally recommend it! The coat usually looks much flatter and more even after we get the undercoat out if its shedding season, we usually see some odd bumpy areas in the coats when they first come in because most people tend to brush unevenly (focus on the butt, or places that their pups love to get pet :D ) However, I don't think doing it at home with the shampoo/conditioner would be a good idea because the weighted conditioner really does work best with the salon dryer.

Depending what setting we put the dryer at yes it does tend to be pretty loud. But most dogs that I work with really don't mind it and if they don't like it we have other options in the salon like kennel dryers and if I can't velocity dry a dog because he is scared I usually just spend a lot more time brushing him out (we are supposed to charge for the extra time but I never have).

I'm not really sure about them drying out a dogs coat, to be honest I've never noticed any of my customer's coats being dried out but I don't want to make any comment on that one because it isn't really something I've looked into personally.

Also! a quick note about what groomer to go to. If you live in the south please make sure the groomer you go to requires all dogs to have proof of their rabies vaccine. Regardless of people's views of vaccines most states in the south require rabies by law since the rate of rabies infections are so high here. If your groomer doesn't follow those laws, I don't want to think what other laws and regulations they aren't following.

Hope this helps! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No problem! I enjoy finding threads on the site that I can help with! :) I am considered a bather not a groomer, the big difference is that I don't do hair-cuts. I can shave a sanitary area and paw pads and I do bathes, teeth brushing, anal gland expression, nail grinding and trimming and basically anything you'd expect from a groom besides a haircut. I get my own customers which are usually short-haired or double coated dogs who wouldn't benefit from a haircut.

I love the results we get with the de-shed treatment and I totally recommend it! The coat usually looks much flatter and more even after we get the undercoat out if its shedding season, we usually see some odd bumpy areas in the coats when they first come in because most people tend to brush unevenly (focus on the butt, or places that their pups love to get pet :D ) However, I don't think doing it at home with the shampoo/conditioner would be a good idea because the weighted conditioner really does work best with the salon dryer.

Depending what setting we put the dryer at yes it does tend to be pretty loud. But most dogs that I work with really don't mind it and if they don't like it we have other options in the salon like kennel dryers and if I can't velocity dry a dog because he is scared I usually just spend a lot more time brushing him out (we are supposed to charge for the extra time but I never have).

I'm not really sure about them drying out a dogs coat, to be honest I've never noticed any of my customer's coats being dried out but I don't want to make any comment on that one because it isn't really something I've looked into personally.

Also! a quick note about what groomer to go to. If you live in the south please make sure the groomer you go to requires all dogs to have proof of their rabies vaccine. Regardless of people's views of vaccines most states in the south require rabies by law since the rate of rabies infections are so high here. If your groomer doesn't follow those laws, I don't want to think what other laws and regulations they aren't following.

Hope this helps! :D
You are a lot of help! :thumbsup: I was thinking of taking my beagle to Lucky Paws and they do require rabies, distemper, and bordatella. Here is the site if you are interested

They charge between $30-$45 for the bath that includes ears, nails, blow dry, and brushout, and then an additional $10-$20 for the 3 step de-shed process -- does this sound about right?

When you say "odd bumpy parts" I think of my beagle's neck fur on top, it's wavy and a little wire-y - I wonder if this type of groom would help smooth that out, that would be great! but I'm mostly just interested in getting out any undercoat that needs tending to.. I'm excited to have this done, maybe even take before/after pics. How often do you think is necessary for a beagle to get a groom/de-shed treatment done? :ponder:

Lastly, how on earth do you know if your dog needs his anal glands expressed?? :eek:

Thank you again!! I would love to learn to be a bather/groomer!
 

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You are a lot of help! :thumbsup: I was thinking of taking my beagle to Lucky Paws and they do require rabies, distemper, and bordatella. Here is the site if you are interested

They charge between $30-$45 for the bath that includes ears, nails, blow dry, and brushout, and then an additional $10-$20 for the 3 step de-shed process -- does this sound about right?

When you say "odd bumpy parts" I think of my beagle's neck fur on top, it's wavy and a little wire-y - I wonder if this type of groom would help smooth that out, that would be great! but I'm mostly just interested in getting out any undercoat that needs tending to.. I'm excited to have this done, maybe even take before/after pics. How often do you think is necessary for a beagle to get a groom/de-shed treatment done? :ponder:

Lastly, how on earth do you know if your dog needs his anal glands expressed?? :eek:

Thank you again!! I would love to learn to be a bather/groomer!
Compared to where I work that seems pretty expensive, but my salon prices by breed, so beagles tend to be on the cheaper side of things. Honestly it depends on how often and how bad he sheds. And the wavey area depends on if thats caused by excess undercoat, if it is, you'll see that smoothed out. The more often you do the de-shedding treatment the better it'll work (you'll see better long-term results the 2nd and 3rd time then the first, although the first is always a fun one!) I would say realistically once every two months should be fine for a beagle, any more frequently and you may dry his skin out. Anal glands vary from dog to dog, but a general rule is that bigger dogs express them on their own when they poop, and smaller dogs can't. If you see any booty-schooching on the carpet or if you notice any strong odor from his rear that's a tell-tale sign. also (brace yourself this is gonna sound super gross) if his butt still looks puckered, even after he's gone to the bathroom, that's a clear indicator that he needs it done.
 

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Compared to where I work that seems pretty expensive, but my salon prices by breed, so beagles tend to be on the cheaper side of things. Honestly it depends on how often and how bad he sheds. And the wavey area depends on if thats caused by excess undercoat, if it is, you'll see that smoothed out. The more often you do the de-shedding treatment the better it'll work (you'll see better long-term results the 2nd and 3rd time then the first, although the first is always a fun one!) I would say realistically once every two months should be fine for a beagle, any more frequently and you may dry his skin out. Anal glands vary from dog to dog, but a general rule is that bigger dogs express them on their own when they poop, and smaller dogs can't. If you see any booty-schooching on the carpet or if you notice any strong odor from his rear that's a tell-tale sign. also (brace yourself this is gonna sound super gross) if his butt still looks puckered, even after he's gone to the bathroom, that's a clear indicator that he needs it done.
I thought it did sound a bit expensive but I do love their establishment. I will have to do some looking around perhaps.

Are there any "risks" involved with having the anal glands expressed? I do recall a couple months ago my dog got up and started licking where he was sitting and I found that he had secreted something awful there (yuck) and I kinda dismissed it as a gross dog thing. I guess that could be a sign he needs it? IDK I feel like it could be an unnecessary treatment but I don't know much about it.

Thank you very much for all the info!
 

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I thought it did sound a bit expensive but I do love their establishment. I will have to do some looking around perhaps.

Are there any "risks" involved with having the anal glands expressed? I do recall a couple months ago my dog got up and started licking where he was sitting and I found that he had secreted something awful there (yuck) and I kinda dismissed it as a gross dog thing. I guess that could be a sign he needs it? IDK I feel like it could be an unnecessary treatment but I don't know much about it.

Thank you very much for all the info!
That totally seems like a sign he needs it! We only express externally (you'd need to go to a vet to express internally, but for most dogs this is unnecessary) There's no risk involved for the dog. Most dogs don't mind but I've had a few snap at me for reaching behind them. It makes them feel much better! Also if anal glands are full and he booty-scoots on your floor and manages to express them that smell is terrible!
 

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That totally seems like a sign he needs it! We only express externally (you'd need to go to a vet to express internally, but for most dogs this is unnecessary) There's no risk involved for the dog. Most dogs don't mind but I've had a few snap at me for reaching behind them. It makes them feel much better! Also if anal glands are full and he booty-scoots on your floor and manages to express them that smell is terrible!
You're absolutely right, it IS terrible! Maybe I'll tack that on my list for things to do. My beagle is pretty shy/timid with strangers, if I had to guess he'd probably just stand very stiff the entire grooming process
 

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You're absolutely right, it IS terrible! Maybe I'll tack that on my list for things to do. My beagle is pretty shy/timid with strangers, if I had to guess he'd probably just stand very stiff the entire grooming process
That happens a ton! Usually if I know I'm working with a shy dog, I'm very quiet and slow through the process, then when I have some free time I keep them out with me (AKA if I'm doing paperwork or whatnot I'll keep them on a short slip-lead next to me) I try to keep the dogs out of the kennels as much as possible and a lot of dogs I work with seem content to just sit next to my chair while they wait to be picked up.
 

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That happens a ton! Usually if I know I'm working with a shy dog, I'm very quiet and slow through the process, then when I have some free time I keep them out with me (AKA if I'm doing paperwork or whatnot I'll keep them on a short slip-lead next to me) I try to keep the dogs out of the kennels as much as possible and a lot of dogs I work with seem content to just sit next to my chair while they wait to be picked up.
I wish you weren't in Florida-- you sound like a great, caring person to bring dogs to! Hopefully it's like that wherever I decide to try.
 

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My Beagle, Pikey, gets groomed every two months. He gets nails clipped, ears cleaned, coat brushed but never any type of shaving. He is my second Beagle and I've been pleasantly surprised at how clean he keeps himself. As far as I know, keeping clean isn't a distinctive trait of the Beagle breed but I continue to be pleased about it.
 

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My Beagle, Pikey, gets groomed every two months. He gets nails clipped, ears cleaned, coat brushed but never any type of shaving. He is my second Beagle and I've been pleasantly surprised at how clean he keeps himself. As far as I know, keeping clean isn't a distinctive trait of the Beagle breed but I continue to be pleased about it.
Thanks for sharing, Pikey is adorable! I always get asked, "aren't beagles known to have a bad smell to them?" I never notice a bad smell...unless we've spent the day in the creek.

Being that you've had two beagles, how much have their personalities differed from each other?
 

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I wish you weren't in Florida-- you sound like a great, caring person to bring dogs to! Hopefully it's like that wherever I decide to try.
That's really sweet! You just made my day! :)
 

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Groomers do not take your dogs and do what they want with them and Youtube isn't the way everything in the world is done. The person who created the video you saw chose to do that to them. Groomers aren't doggy boot camp.

I bathe my Beagle myself at random times. Sometimes 8+ months go without it and then if he actually gets dirty from somewhere we went twice in one month.. he'll get two baths that month. He lives on the couch, walks on cement..doesn't smell...baths just aren't needed regularly.

I've never even heard of shaving a Beagle unless it were for medical purposes like mast cell cancer, foxtails, the dog got covered in paint or something.. or someone can't deal with the shedding. Sometimes health issues like heart disease cause excessive shedding more than normal. Or sometimes the humans have health issues that are triggered by shedding and I rather see shaved dogs than people dumping them. Some people think dogs need to be shaved in the summer to stay cool but that isn't true for every breed nor good for them. Some breeds have weatherproof fur. Some shave black dogs for tick prevention or finding them easier.....some Beagles have a lot of black.
 

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Thanks for sharing, Pikey is adorable! I always get asked, "aren't beagles known to have a bad smell to them?"
I think that's from the old days of hunters living in the woods and the Beagles roaming around the woods all day and hunting... digging in rabbit holes, rolling around in rabbit poop, etc. In the states where they're over-bred by hunters, the hunters tend to just keep them in an outside kennel all day..with their own poop. Any dog living like that would smell.

Other than that, they're prone to ear infections and yeast issues with the ears...that can have a raunchy smell to it.
 

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Thanks for sharing, Pikey is adorable! I always get asked, "aren't beagles known to have a bad smell to them?" I never notice a bad smell...unless we've spent the day in the creek.

Being that you've had two beagles, how much have their personalities differed from each other?
The personalities of Joe Buck (my first Beagle) and Pikey are surprisingly very different. I got Joe Buck from a nearby breeder and raised him from puppy hood. He was more reserved and insisted in sleeping in his own place in the house. He didn't have any hangups and, like Pikey, loved to bark, go for walks and eat. Pikey was adopted from a local shelter at age 7 and I know nothing about his background but he throws a tantrum when I go out and barks fiercely at other dogs when we pass them. He wouldn't think of sleeping anywhere except my bed and likes to sleep very close to me. He dreams and seems to be dreaming about chasing something. On our walks, he ignores squirrels and cats but loves to meet other people and will stay as long as they pet him and rave about him. Both dogs were precious and adorable and great companions.

I never detected an odor from either Joe Buck or Pikey and I'm still surprised at how clean both of them kept themselves. I had wanted a Beagle for most of my life and it was a happy day when I got Joe Buck back in 2001. His birthday is easy to remember because he was born just 3 days before the 911 attacks.

(I almost forgot this. Pikey is afraid of thunder which causes him to whine and get under the bed).
 
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