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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really wish people would be proactive with their dogs- not reactive.

I live on the eleventh floor of my apartment building and about 70% of the time I take the stairs. The elevator normally takes a long time, so Nevy and I just bite the bullet and get our cardio in. With the new puppy though, I've had to take the elevator. And oh. My. Gosh.

I don't know how many times I've gone in there with Echo, only to have the door open and a dog on a flexi leash darts out. There are a lot of reactive dogs in my building, so this is normally done with lots of barking and lunging going on as well. Well, Echo got tangled up with one and trampled all over and it's really affected her. Since it's happened she's been very uncomfortable if dogs get very close to her. She tries to run and hide, but if the dog persists she starts barking and crying. Trying really hard to combat this by playing LAT and "let's go!" games. She's also enrolled in puppy class so hopefully a controlled environment where she can see dogs will help as well.

I'm just so frustrated. I don't blame the dogs in my building- but the owners. Like, if I owned a reactive dog I would not have it on an unlocked flexi lead. Especially if I was in a building where several people own dogs. And these people don't seem overly concerned. Their dog runs at us, and then it's almost like they stand there and let stuff happen, and then apologize.

Manage your dogs better!
 

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Flexi-leads, dog reactivity and narrow corridors. That will wind up as a dog fight, like... tomorrow. :eek:

Maybe you could gently hint that they get a regular lead and some sort of walking aid for their dog. Say you saw a dog fight this one time that started exactly the same way. That's usually the tack I take so that I don't come off as a condescending know-it-all.
 

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Unfortunately, not everyone is like the people on this board. Some don't exactly understand what a reactive dog is or how to work with one correctly. As a result, they simply do their best to cope with behavior as its happening, rather than preventing it. But I totally feel your pain. It's hard living in an apartment and taking the elevator. Merlin isn't reactive at all and loves other dogs, but I usually ask if it's alright for us to get on the elevator if I see someone with a dog already on it, just to be sure.
No one is perfect either. Merlin is extremely friendly with other dogs, and sometimes he gets up in other dog's faces before I have even realized that he's done it, which leads to plenty of barking. Thankfully, I've managed to get a handle on him before anything bad happens, but it's definitely lead me to tighten my grip on the leash.
 

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There are times I want to track down the person or persons who invented the retractable leash/flexi-lead and throttle him/her/them with the stupid thing. I've seen them cause problems in the hands of people who don't know how to use them, and too often, the people who have them don't seem to realize they can actually limit the distance their dogs can go on them. Or perhaps they don't care. They also tangle up way too easily, even with regular leashes, so that even if the dogs involved are getting along, it becomes a pain to get those leashes separated again when it's necessary to do so. I've used one exactly once--because I was taking someone else's dog out to go potty when she couldn't, and it was the leash I was handed--and I also found the big, boxy plastic handle much more cumbersome to handle, plus I couldn't get any feeling for the dog on the other end of the leash through it. It made me wonder all over again what the point of such a thing was--it tangles more easily, it makes it easier for the dog to get way too far away from the handler, and it lessens the feeling of the connection between the dog and the handler (IMO). Is the idea that the dog feels as if it has greater freedom while still on a lead? Is that necessarily a good thing? It seems like a bad idea to me. If you want a dog to have greater freedom, teach the dog a strong recall and find a safe place for it to be off-lead, like a large fenced yard, but when it's on lead, let the dog understand that being on lead is different, that it's a joint operation between the two of you.

And there's just zero excuse for a reactive dog to be on an unrestrained flexi lead around other dogs. Or to have your own dog on one if you know that it could likely run into a reactive dog that would be bothered greatly by such a situation. Dang. For how many years did those things not exist and everyone walked dogs just fine without them? Why, oh why, were they ever necessary for normal walking situations?
 

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You can bet that if that happened with the same person/dog and my dog more than once they would have a tongue lashing like you wouldn't believe. I'd go so far as to threaten to pepper spray a dog if the owner didn't get it through their thick heads. While I'm not fond of flexi leashes they are not the problem in the situation... it's the inattentive owners! I've had to deal with those kinds of owners around here, except in my case it's usually people who choose to not use a leash at all...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I don't really see the use in flexi leads. Maybe they have a specific niche, but I much prefer a standard 4, 6, or 8 foot leash (each one has it's specific uses).

Honestly, my building has gotten bad. A man in my building has to muzzle his two JRTs now because the one snapped at a person in the lobby, my neighbour has a 10 month old Cane Corso that is super reactive and barks all the time, and there are several other mixes in the building that bark and lunge at dogs that walk by. I just wish people were more educated/receptive. I've had my neighbour ask me for leash training advice and I gave it, directed him here and to Kikopup, and printed off stuff for him too. Three days later I saw him again and he claimed he "tried it all and none of it worked"...

I realize not everyone is as educated/dedicated as the people on this forum, I just wish there were more that were.
 

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Ugh Flexi leads. It makes no sense to me to have your dog twenty feet away from you. How much control could you possibly have?
I too have tried to explain to my family how to train dogs to walk on leash, or not bark, and they are willing to try it for a day, maybe. Then all I hear about is how it doesn't work. *sigh*
 
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Speaking from experience with a dog-reactive dog....wait around corners, don't put yourself in a bad spot, and talk to people who you know have dogs before an incident happens. Once the girl with the golden (who has her dog on a flexi) realized that having her dog rush Koda ended up in her dog almost getting hurt, she was much more careful-so hopefully people are at least responsive for future incidents.

You'll also want to take better measures to not have them rush your dog...best way to produce fear is to trap someone in a corner and give them no way out. Better to take the stairs and carry the puppy than to have them become dog-reactive due to poor planning. It sucks but the prevention is worth it. You don't want the consequences of one of those dogs actually starting a fight.
 

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I totally feel your pain. I'm constantly at war (in my own head lol) with the others in my building. We have even more problems in our complex dog park.
 

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I dog sit....I have a safety gate in my 4 by 4ft. foyer separating it from the rest of the house...WHY? I DON'T LET ANY CHILDREN beyond this gate...they try to pick up my doggy visitors, put their faces right in the dog faces, and are TOTAL TERRORS in my home. Some parents get REALLY mad at me for keeping their kids out of my home...lol...even tho I tell them it's for their own "safety"....NOT! It's humans that are problematic...and I am a retires school social worker, yikes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, I think carrying her down the stairs will have to do for now. Just sucks because she's already 24 pounds, so I'm not sure how much longer I'll be able to carry her for. :( And I'm worried going up and down the stairs that much before a year will be taxing for her body. Or do you guys think I'm paranoid?
 

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What a crappy situation.

But I don`t get the hate on flexis? I think they are great. Everyone here uses them and we dont have problems :ponder:

Do people just let the dogs run freely on them?

Flexi is a great tool for hikes/walks in calmer areas. I love it and Ella does too. It`s very convenient. It still means that you have to have your wits about you tho.In crowded places, just fix it so it`s short and problem solved.

It`s the people not the leash.
 

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What a crappy situation.

But I don`t get the hate on flexis? I think they are great. Everyone here uses them and we dont have problems :ponder:

Do people just let the dogs run freely on them?

Flexi is a great tool for hikes/walks in calmer areas. I love it and Ella does too. It`s very convenient. It still means that you have to have your wits about you tho.In crowded places, just fix it so it`s short and problem solved.

It`s the people not the leash.
Yeah around here the big drawback is crowded suburban sidewalks, apartment buildings, stuff like that where people use them and just never bother locking them or controlling the length.
 

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What a crappy situation.

But I don`t get the hate on flexis? I think they are great. Everyone here uses them and we dont have problems :ponder:

Do people just let the dogs run freely on them?

Flexi is a great tool for hikes/walks in calmer areas. I love it and Ella does too. It`s very convenient. It still means that you have to have your wits about you tho.In crowded places, just fix it so it`s short and problem solved.

It`s the people not the leash.
Exactly. I think those leashes are great for dogs that cannot really be trusted off leash, but need more freedom to run and play and investigate in appropriate settings. The fact that some people aren't using them correctly isn't the leash's fault. It has the ability to be shortened and locked. If people are refusing to do that, that's their own stupidity.
I'm getting one tomorrow for my dog so I can take him to a family picnic on the river and let him explore the water without having to be a few feet from him at all times.
 

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What a crappy situation.

But I don`t get the hate on flexis? I think they are great. Everyone here uses them and we dont have problems :ponder:

Do people just let the dogs run freely on them?

Flexi is a great tool for hikes/walks in calmer areas. I love it and Ella does too. It`s very convenient. It still means that you have to have your wits about you tho.In crowded places, just fix it so it`s short and problem solved.

It`s the people not the leash.
Yes, people do just let their dogs run freely on them.

They can be a wonderful tool in the hands of someone paying attention, such as someone like yourself. Too many people, however, do not pay attention and thus dogs get into trouble. I simply prefer a regular leash, if only because I get the 'dropsies' and retractable leashes magically seem to leap from my hands. And then that is a whole 'nother mess....
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In my area it seems to be a lot of people who have dogs that pull on leash, so it's used as more of a band-aid solution in a lot of cases. Just from observing people (I'm a creep) it almost seems like people always have their dogs on the "unlocked" setting, so their shoulders aren't being ripped out of their sockets, and as soon as something happens they "lock" it. And then once they pass whatever they "unlock" again.

Not everyone though!
 

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Yeah around here the big drawback is crowded suburban sidewalks, apartment buildings, stuff like that where people use them and just never bother locking them or controlling the length.
I think it`s a cultural thing to some extent. People in Estonia seem much more careful about dogs - about controlling their own dog in the public and also about approaching strange dogs (especially big ones). The Americans I have met have all been very bold in approaching my dog. I was in a cafe once and this man just straight walked up to us and started stroking Ella`s HEAD. No Estonian does that unless they have asked "is she friendly" and "may I?" before hand :D I also see you guys here complain about strangers approaching your dogs all the time and petting them without asking ...

I have a theory (bare with me :p) that it is because in US dog training and classes are almost a norm alas, most dogs out and about are very well socialzed/trained and people assume they are harmless.

In here, dog training en masse is rare and new. Most dogs dont go to puppy classes etc and most dogs are never consciously socialized. So people in general are more careful about approaching strange dogs (because they don`t want their fingers to be bitten off :D). I think most Estonian dogs are still used as working dogs in guarding home and property. We have less companion dogs.
 
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