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Discussion Starter #1
My 8-9 year old male Basset Hound has developed a severe skin problem that is mostly on his entire underside. He smells, his skin is red, he wants to lick himself all the time. Vet gave me a bar soap to use, but I bought shampoo for seborrhea which seemed to give him some relief at first and I changed his kibble to one for sensitive skin. He is also developing lumps under the skin of his belly. He has been wearing a Jafco muzzle to stop the licking. We have been bathing him for two months now (every 3 days), but he doesn't seem to be improving. Any suggestions? Is there a cure? I live in Guatemala.
 

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Sounds like you need to get to the underlying cause of the problem.

Did the vet say if it's yeast, bacterial, or something else?

Does his mouth smell, or is it just his skin? I'm trying to narrow down why his skin may smell. Yeast has a very bad smell, but if he has bad breath that will transfer to the skin when he licks himself.

What food are you feeding him?

When you switched his food did you make sure to change it to one that does not have the same main ingredients as the old food?

Does he get any treats? What kind? Does it have the same grains and proteins as the old food? Does it have anything like dyes, or other additives?

Have you tried Benedryl and if so did it give him any relief?
 

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I feed him a ProPlan kibble for sensitive skin, but tried cooked chicken, egg, chopped apple, cooked carrots mix. Vet information/care is very limited here and the vet just sold me a bar soap to use. He has a dark crust on his legs and when he is not wearing the muzzle he licks himself incessantly. I will try Benadryl. What can I do if it is a yeast problem? and how would that be diagnosed? I bought a shampoo for seborrhea to use twice a week. He is about 9 years old and I "rescued" him from a roadside pet shop where he had been kept in a cage that was not big enough to turn around.
 

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I am going to go back to making his food: chicken, green beans, egg, and will try the vinegar rinse for his feet and after shampooing. The yeast diagnosis makes more sense since he does have black crusty stuff on his legs, belly, feet. Thanks!
 

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You're welcome!

If he does not improve on the homemade food try switching the protein. It may be that the chicken is what's causing him problems, or it could be environmental. An example is my dog cannot have chicken and I discovered it back when he had colitis last year. He was eating a chicken based kibble, and when he got the colitis I put him on chicken and rice, well he didn't get better and his stool got softer and softer, when I switched from chicken and rice to lean ground beef and rice he finally got better. Now whenever he gets too much chicken he gets soft stool and his anal glands act up.

If you opt to cook for him long term you are going to have to feed organ meat, and you are going to have to have a source for calcium. A way to get around that is to home cook and feed a supplement. I used to use this one back when I cooked for my elderly dog https://www.amazon.com/Nutri-Pet-Research-Nupro-Supplement-5-Pound/dp/B002V80QW6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1486836907&sr=8-2&keywords=nupro&th=1 but there are lots of other ones that are just as good.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Organ meat? like liver?
What other source for calcium?

I live in Central America and most US products are not available here.
 

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Organ meat? like liver?
What other source for calcium?

I live in Central America and most US products are not available here.

Liver is the big one, but if you can get them there's kidney, spleen, lungs, brain, and green tripe. A basic rule of thumb is that organ meat should equal 10% of the diet. You do not have to feed organ meat with every meal, nor do you have to include a bunch of different organ meats all the time, but do make sure to include it every now and then.

The easiest way to include calcium is to simply feed the dog some raw bone like neck bones, chicken wings and backs, etc. You need them to be raw, not cooked, cooked bones can splinter and kill a dog. You don't want weight bearing bones, like cow femurs, because they are hard and mainly used for recreational chewing. The added benefit of feeding raw bones is that he'll be getting all the minerals in the marrow besides the calcium, and the bones will help keep his teeth clean. Feeding them a couple times a week should be fine.

If you don't want to feed raw bones then you can try grinding egg shells into a powder and sprinkling some onto his food when you feed him. Plain yogurt will give him a bit of calcium and also help put good bacteria into his gut. I know that some people use human calcium supplements but I'm unsure of the dosage of that and would have to look it up for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Holy cow (so to speak)....this is really hard for me! I am a vegetarian! I really appreciate your help; hubby is doing the "hard" work (working with the meaty stuff). but anything for my darlings!
 
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