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On sunday we adopted a 2 year old black and tan coonhound, Dana, as a companion to our 9 year old basset, Sausage, who is very timid and submissive. Our beagle passed away at the beginning of October, she was definitely the dominant dog and helped our basset come out of his shell. After she died, our basset started regressing back to his more timid ways, so we decided to get him a new friend. We were told by the foster family that Dana does well with all people and dogs and is generally loving and affectionate. The meeting on Sunday went great, she loved everyone, let everyone pet her, was great with my 2 year old and 12 year old. That evening was fine too, she explored the house and claimed herself a spot in the kitchen for the night. On Monday I was home with her all day, took her for a walk (she is also afraid to get in the car, but that's a different problem), she was affectionate and would come to me/sit with me. Did fine when my daughter got home from school, but when my husband got home from work she immediately started growling and barking at him, running away as if she were afraid of him. This continued the next morning as he was leaving for work, and into the next day so I did research and decided to have him armed with treats today when he came home. She barked at him when he got home and he threw some treats, when she would come near her, he would give her treats. She would take treats from his hand and then back away and growl some more. She then started following him around the house, growling/barking and then looking at his hands as if she expected treats. She barked all through dinner. She then sat on the couch with me and allowed him to sit next to her, but continued to look at him and growl at him occassionally. He finally gave up and went to bed and she stopped barking. I'm not sure what to do or why she is behaving like this, foster says they have never seen this side of her, but they also have 5 dogs so she wasn't in a position to need to feel dominant I suppose. I think she may be feeding off of my bassets insecurities, as he has always been wary of men and submissive toward my husband despite efforts to make him feel more comfortable. Any ideas of how to stop this behavior so we can all enjoy our new dog?
 

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Have super high value tiny bits of food at the ready. Don't have your husband give treats or toss treats to her. You give the treats when your husband appears. When he leaves, treats stop. Don't put the dog in a position to approach him for food. Many dogs will overcome their fear for the food and then find themselves uncomfortably close.

You may not see this dog's personality emerge for several more weeks and adjustment may take months. I'd recommend McConnell's book Love Has No Age Limits. Great book for anyone adopting a dog.

Here's a blog post that might give you some perspective. Three Ways to Confuse a New Dog
 

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She's not been home for a week yet! Give her some time, she'll probably come around :) Have you thought about enrolling her in training classes? That's always a good first step when bringing a dog into the family. Maybe make him in charge of feeding her?
 

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@Houndluver, I just noticed this in your post:

," foster says they have never seen this side of her, but they also have 5 dogs so she wasn't in a position to need to feel dominant I suppose."

A dog that barks and growls in the manner you've described is not trying to dominate. In fact, dogs don't try to dominate us, ever. This dog seems to be trying to keep your husband away and that's most likely fear based. How a dog is described when in foster care can be very misleading.

You might want to get the book Culture Clash in addition to the other book I recommended.
 

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This was posted on FB by a local (to me) vet behaviorist :

Tuesday's Pearl: Food is not an effective counter-conditioning tool when it’s being offered by the scary stranger.
If you’ve ever raised a puppy, you probably asked all kinds of people to offer her food and interact (safely) with her. This is a good strategy for socializing puppies who seem reasonably confident around unfamiliar people. But...with worried or fearful dogs of any age, it’s often not a great strategy for a few reasons:
First, fearful dogs are, well, fearful – any interaction with an unknown person can simply be threatening to them. Forced "greetings" can make them more fearful, not less.
Second, when offering food, people usually stare, bend and reach towards the dog – which, in dog language, can be loosely translated as "I'm going to eat you now."
Third, significantly fearful dogs may defensively bite even after taking and eating the food. The treat itself is basically uncoupled from the person offering it. This is common, and can be explained by understanding that the dog is ambivalent (“This person is creepy, but that liver is irresistible!”). He may choose to take the food as the arm reaches out, and at the same time be intimidated by that arm. But as it’s withdrawn after the treat is taken, the arm is a little less intimidating, while your dog is just as ambivalent. Th upshot is that fearful dogs commonly bite body parts that are moving away from them.
If your dog is worried around unfamiliar people on leash walks or in your home, ask them to ignore him (you might need to define "ignore" and tell them to resist eye contact, reaching, bending, petting and feeding. Instead, *you* should be the one to make it rain liver in the presence of strangers. This simple strategy counter-conditions the fear by associating the scary clowns with food and simply avoiding intimidating postures and interactions altogether. If anything is going to help your dog feel less frightened when strangers are looming over her, it will be a consistent sense of safety and predictability.

Reisner Vet Behavior
 

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On sunday we adopted a 2 year old black and tan coonhound, Dana, as a companion to our 9 year old basset, Sausage, who is very timid and submissive. Our beagle passed away at the beginning of October, she was definitely the dominant dog and helped our basset come out of his shell. After she died, our basset started regressing back to his more timid ways, so we decided to get him a new friend. We were told by the foster family that Dana does well with all people and dogs and is generally loving and affectionate. The meeting on Sunday went great, she loved everyone, let everyone pet her, was great with my 2 year old and 12 year old. That evening was fine too, she explored the house and claimed herself a spot in the kitchen for the night. On Monday I was home with her all day, took her for a walk (she is also afraid to get in the car, but that's a different problem), she was affectionate and would come to me/sit with me. Did fine when my daughter got home from school, but when my husband got home from work she immediately started growling and barking at him, running away as if she were afraid of him. This continued the next morning as he was leaving for work, and into the next day so I did research and decided to have him armed with treats today when he came home. She barked at him when he got home and he threw some treats, when she would come near her, he would give her treats. She would take treats from his hand and then back away and growl some more. She then started following him around the house, growling/barking and then looking at his hands as if she expected treats. She barked all through dinner. She then sat on the couch with me and allowed him to sit next to her, but continued to look at him and growl at him occassionally. He finally gave up and went to bed and she stopped barking. I'm not sure what to do or why she is behaving like this, foster says they have never seen this side of her, but they also have 5 dogs so she wasn't in a position to need to feel dominant I suppose. I think she may be feeding off of my bassets insecurities, as he has always been wary of men and submissive toward my husband despite efforts to make him feel more comfortable. Any ideas of how to stop this behavior so we can all enjoy our new dog?
My trainer actually told me specifically not to do this, because then we were rewarding Trucker for his fearful behavior. We were to be armed with treats and ignore him until he was not growling and barking. Then once he was quite Jeremy was to toss or slide a treat over to him ensuring not to hit him. We we told to never reward or comfort with the "It's okay, You're okay" or tell him "Quite" but rather to just act as normal and then he would use our body language as cues that it was okay.
 

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I think there's actually a very fine line when it comes to "rewarding" fearful behavior.

You can't reward fear itself, really. It is an emotion, so no dog will think "wow, it's really rewarding to be afraid".

What you CAN sometimes accidentally reward is the behavior (barking, lunging) **BUT** only if the dog is freely engaging in that behavior. If the dog is simply reacting on his fear, without thinking, giving treats is harmless because the dog isn't behaving consciously therefore that behavior can't really be rewarded. What the treats do is try to change the dog's emotional state so that the dog feels safe enough to think, at which point you can work on behavior.

...hopefully that makes sense??

An example would be my reactive dog. When we started working with our trainer he jumped out of the car in full-on bark/lunge/growl mode. We simply moved as far away as we needed, so he could see the trainers but wasn't freaking out and fed him treat after treat. Then we moved and did it again. And again. No matter what he was doing, if he could see those women he was getting treats.

Then, one day we got out of the car. As usual, he went into bark/growl/lunge mode. We did our little jog to get the heck out of dodge...but this time, Chisum wanted to go back. He would trot over there, right up to my trainer and put on his little show. This was the woman with the treats, after all.

At that point, we switched gears. If he barked, he was jogged away. When he returned, my trainer asked him to sit - he gladly complied - and he got a treat. Before long, he was sitting and downing and whatever else they asked because he wasn't afraid any longer (of them anyway) so he was learning to behave a certain way to get his reward. But the FEAR was gone.

Any new person or scary thing and we had the treats out again, counter conditioning.

I think it's a really fine line, which is why I am thankful for my trainer. I think it's better to err on the side of caution and just keep your dog under threshold and CC with treats until you get some professional advice. Just a few sessions can be very helpful.
 

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She barked at him when he got home and he threw some treats, when she would come near her, he would give her treats. She would take treats from his hand and then back away and growl some more. She then started following him around the house, growling/barking and then looking at his hands as if she expected treats. She barked all through dinner. She then sat on the couch with me and allowed him to sit next to her, but continued to look at him and growl at him occassionally. He finally gave up and went to bed and she stopped barking.

This will help you understand counter conditioning. I think what is happening here is the treat is coming at the wrong time plus don't have him hand it to her that is to confrontational. Just have him casually drop them and move on. No eye contact just become a treat machine if she is not growling.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PhqFdaNduo
 
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