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Ok will someone please tell me how I train this dog to stop barking..

I can't take her with me to an apartment if she keeps this up because it would just disturb the neighbors way too much..

She barks when someone comes in the door. We make sure she sees that we are allowing the guest to come in. We let her know "it's okay." but nonetheless she keeps barking.

Heck it's not just company she barks at, she barks at US when we're coming in too!!

Just the minute she hears anything going on with the door she goes off.

My dad and grandpa stomp at her and chase at her when she does it and that doesn't solve much of anything but making her scared of them.

My mom and I talk playful to her and she normally gets excited and starts her butt dance and jumping.

So I just don't know what to do..
 

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Heck it's not just company she barks at, she barks at US when we're coming in too!!

Just the minute she hears anything going on with the door she goes off.

My dad and grandpa stomp at her and chase at her when she does it and that doesn't solve much of anything but making her scared of them.
I can't tell you the secrets to stopping the barking - I'm still working on that myself - but I can share a few thoughts with you. First, she probably barks at you when you come in because she's excited. Happiness and anxiety are both types of excitement. One of my dogs does this when I come home. Going off when something occurs at the door is a fairly common thing for a dog to do. They quickly learn that the door is where people and animals enter and exit, so that's the boundary of their domain. They'll guard it. I would strongly discourage (and by that I mean flatly telling them to stop) your dad and grandpa from stomping at and yelling at the dog. It's difficult dealing with family and not offending them, but try to find the right words. You're right, this treatment doesn't accomplish anything but scaring the poor dog, which elevates her excitement level, and makes her even more prone to bark. Dogs bark for a number of reasons, one of which is excitement. You need to work on calming the dog down, not allowing people to freak her out. Good luck.

p.s. I'd suggest working on some basic obedience training with your dog. This tends to focus them on you and commands better, and also calms them down. Even if my puppies (all 4) are freaking out and running around, if I pull out the bag of training treats, all butts hit the ground as one, waiting for instructions. It's really cute.
 

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it sounds like your dog is undersocialized; she really needs more training and socialization. Obedience classes are probably your best bet, this will allow your dog to interact with other humans and dogs.

Are stomping and chasing the dog are very bad ideas, since that's probably the game she likes to play, it may even lead to a mixed message, which is also bad for proper training.

You could try picking her up when others come to visit, but that's only an emergency solution.
Training will help her to develop confidence and she'll be a master of all situations. Her present behavior is most likely due to insecurity and lack of confidence.
 

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it sounds like your dog is undersocialized; she really needs more training and socialization. Obedience classes are probably your best bet, this will allow your dog to interact with other humans and dogs.

Are stomping and chasing the dog are very bad ideas, since that's probably the game she likes to play, it may even lead to a mixed message, which is also bad for proper training.

You could try picking her up when others come to visit, but that's only an emergency solution.
Training will help her to develop confidence and she'll be a master of all situations. Her present behavior is most likely due to insecurity and lack of confidence.
She is FAR from undersocialized. I've constantly taken her to petsmart and to my friend's house. She also has met every dog in this neighborhood as well as every person.

The barking is the only problem I have. It's not out of aggression it's more alert barking she just doesn't grasp the concept of when to stop.

I realize the stomping and chasing her is a bad idea but that's not in my control. I've told them to stop constantly but they are not going to listen to someone who is far younger than them when they already think they know it all.
 

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Personally I would teach a "quiet" or "stop", and possibly also use removal techniques if she continues to bark at guests after they have entered the house.

I don't know that I would be able to explain how to teach "quiet" clearly. Some of the other members here might be able to, or might have other suggestions!

This video is an example of removal techniques. You would need to adjust it to the situation, but you would essentially remove her from the room everytime she barked at a guest as the enter your house (if that is the case!).
 

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My dad and grandpa stomp at her and chase at her when she does it and that doesn't solve much of anything but making her scared of them.
while theyre busy scaring her for it......

My mom and I talk playful to her and she normally gets excited and starts her butt dance and jumping.
you just rewarded her for it.........

kmes hit the nail on the head with both suggestions. she showed you the removal, now i will talk about the quiet training.

first step- bark on cue: put a cue to her barking, speak. this shouldnt be hard. say speak, wait for a bark. reward the bark, repeat. now if you say speak and she doesnt do anything, what i did with my girls is get them really excited with it "speak! speak!" and i got really excited and just topped them out so that they wanted to speak to release energy.

step 2- reward the quiet- get her to speak. OR get her when she is barking. wait til the barking stops for 2-3 seconds, treat and say "quiet". repeat repeat repeat!!!!!!

barking never stops easily, just like puppy play biting. it takes time and a lot of repetition.
 

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I've been training 'quiet'. Our dog barks at people at the door, but that's it. Regardless of who they are she'll stop barking and calm once they come in, but she's been getting better. One thing I've heard of doing is to keep treats at the front door and let the person at the door give a treat.
 

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I realize the stomping and chasing her is a bad idea but that's not in my control. I've told them to stop constantly but they are not going to listen to someone who is far younger than them when they already think they know it all.
What you said here is the root of the problem. Dogs generally bark because they're excited. By excited I mean happy, aggressive, anxious... the works. Anything that excites their emotional state will generally be accompanied by barking. In order to get your dog to stop barking, you yourself have to be calm. Dogs can sense when you're not in control of yourself, and this upsets them. You're the one they look up to for guidance, and if you're upset, they should be upset.

I can well understand how difficult dealing with family members can be. Over time I've learned to deal with family older than I am and asserting what I need to, generally without being offensive about it. Your statement that their behavior is not in your control is indicative of why you cannot get your dog to stop barking. You can't tell them how to live or act in general, but this is your dog, not theirs. Their behavior is making your dog unhappy and more difficult to deal with. If the environment that your dog lives in is out of your control, then your chances of training your dog to stop barking are between slim and none.
 

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I've been training 'quiet'. Our dog barks at people at the door, but that's it. Regardless of who they are she'll stop barking and calm once they come in, but she's been getting better. One thing I've heard of doing is to keep treats at the front door and let the person at the door give a treat.
i wouldnt suggest this. mainly because if your dog is barking at the door and someone walks in and gives them a treat, youve reinforced them barking.

you really should be the one treating your dog for a quiet, and having them quiet and behaved BEFORE someone comes in.
 

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I can sympathize.

Great Dane Mom's way, teach speak, then quiet, is the only way I ever learned to teach quiet.

Hawk barks anytime he gets excited. This has been harder to control.

When our actions telegraph we're getting ready to go somewhere, he starts.

I've found other sounds, not necessarily words, and standing quietly until he stops barking, sits and looks at me works best. My husband sometimes gets frustrated and yells at him. This shuts Hawk up for a minute, then he starts again.

I have better control at the door. He barks, I go to the door, putting him in a sit stay back from the door. He's quiet. He waits until the guest is in and seated or I release him.

Try sitting the family down and explaining "it isn't working" let's try something different...??? If they feel part of the decision, it might help you.
 
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