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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I am adopting a puppy and this is the only picture I have. I would greatly appreciate any and all feedback so I know what I am getting into. The picture is of 8 weeks and he has a full tail. That is everything I know. Please provide any help you can I am very interested in what he might be, how he will look, and how big he will become!

Thanks!
 

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It's hard to say at this age. I think he def has some aussie in him.
 

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Could be the mix. I see Aussie too.

I have an Aussie/Catahoula mix, but if I didn't know that was her mix for sure, I'd never guess it. She's a little bigger than an Aussie, but otherwise she's all Aussie in looks and temperament.

Catahoulas are awesome dogs too, but they tend to be little "harder" in terms of intensity. I believe @Liminal has one, so maybe she can tell you a little more about Catahoulas.

Count on a high-energy, high-intelligence dog. Easy to train, but difficult to maintain. Smart dogs tend to get bored easily, and will find trouble or make it if they get the chance :) If you do a lot of reading on both Aussies and Catahoulas, you may get some sort of an idea on what to expect, as mixes can really take on any traits.

I will say that my Aussie mix is one of the best dogs I've ever had. Aussies are just hands down, awesome. I've yet to have a bad one. She's very loving and sensitive, but afraid of nothing. Very protective - not in a reactive way, but in an alert way that lets me know she's got an eye on things.

That's a very cute puppy, and I'm sure he'll be an awesome dog :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback poppykenna and jclark343... I'm curious about the breeds but am otherwise expecting a very active and smart dog, time will tell.
 

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oh, wow, that puppy is adorable!!! If I didn't already have dogs I'd HAVE to have this one. :)
 

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I could see Catahoula mix, or Aussie mix, though unless you know for certain the puppy is part Catahoula I'd lean more toward Aussie sheerly due to the fact that purebred Aussies are more common than purebred Catahoulas.

Anyway, Catahoulas and Aussies are actually pretty similar dogs in a lot of ways. Both are favorite breeds of mine (but I like most curs and herders, so...) PoppyKenna is right that Catahoulas are probably a little more "hard" on average, or at least more challenging to train, for a couple of reasons:

- They're bred to track (which means they may be tempted to focus more on nice smells than you)

-They're bred to work with more difficult animals (feral hogs and cattle) and to be rougher with them than most Aussie lines are. (Catahoulas have a reputation for being too bitey with young or docile livestock and when they get to playing you might find they're too bitey with you, too)

- They're bred to work at more of a distance, which means relying less on a handler for cues.

- Catahoulas have, as of yet, been bred less for solely companion purposes. Working dog lines are generally more intense than companion lines, and the majority of Catahoulas still have working dogs in their immediate background. (Unfortunately I am afraid this will soon change, I really predict that the breed will start going downhill fast in the near future considering how trendy they're becoming.)

- They're less specialized, but their breeding still emphasizes purpose. A lot of them want to herd some, track some, protect some, kinda-point a little, retrieve a little....

- Despite being physically tough, they're often less mentally/emotionally tough. Catahoulas seem to be prone to "pouting" and shutting down when an owner becomes distressed or frustrated, so many don't take correction or prolonged training as well as Aussies usually do.

- They mature less quickly than a lot of comparable breeds. A lot of them are goobers until about two years.

Basically, in comparison to Aussies, Catahoulas are somewhat less naturally biddable and human-focused, rougher, and have a lot of different utility instincts jammed into their brains that all need to be managed. They can come off as a little less focused in that way.

In a mix of both breeds or either breed, I'd make sure to socialize very, very well because both breeds tend to want to defend owners and property which can become reactivity if the dog isn't exposed to a wide range of situations. (My dog was socialized well but I am still having to deal with disproportionate defensiveness in him as an adolescent.) Both breeds produce their share of dog selective and scrappy individuals. I'd also invest in a flirt pole early on to help excise any inappropriate herding behaviors.

And consider training the dog to do "chores" around the house - Aussies and Catahoulas are both emotionally involved with their families and seem to want to be needed more than most dog breeds. My dog knows to bring me things I can't reach when I point and ask and to hand things back to me if I drop them. He can find my keys for me (imperfectly). I hope to teach him to find my hat and sunglasses soon, as well as turn on lights, both of which I think will prove useful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks liminal...appreciate all the good feedback. I know there are many similarities with the two breeds, and I suppose over time I'll see what traits are showing. The dog will be in an apartment, which, I know isn't best for him but I'll be quite active with him throughout the day and plan to get out and jog and take him to the park. I'll socialize him early, as I have been reading about the catahoula side being overly defensive and and only loving to its owner. I have a lot to learn. Really appreciate all your help.
 

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Thanks liminal...appreciate all the good feedback. I know there are many similarities with the two breeds, and I suppose over time I'll see what traits are showing. The dog will be in an apartment, which, I know isn't best for him but I'll be quite active with him throughout the day and plan to get out and jog and take him to the park. I'll socialize him early, as I have been reading about the catahoula side being overly defensive and and only loving to its owner. I have a lot to learn. Really appreciate all your help.
You can keep any sized dog in any sized apartment (well, I wouldn't keep a Tibetan Mastiff in a 300 sq ft NYC studio) as long as you commit to getting outside and exercising for at least 2 hours a day, every day. In my experience, most dogs kept in apartments (note I said MOST, not all) are far better socialized and trained than dogs who live in homes with big backyards, because they have to be. You can't just throw a ball for an hour in your backyard when you don't have one, so you're forced to socialize and train your dog. If you care about your dog, that is.
 

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I just adopted a 5 month old Catahoula/Pyrenees mix who was rescued at 4 weeks of age, along with 5 siblings, after their mother was hit and killed by a truck. She has since been at a refuge with her siblings and some human contact. It's only been a week and she is adjusting considering all that she has experienced in just one week. My concern now is that she still is acting very skittish or rather non trusting of us. Once minute she can be cuddled up with me but then later in the evening run away from me if I walk toward her. She will follow us but does not like to be approached. Any advice or an explanation?
 
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