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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking for a reputable Border Collie breeder around London for some time. I have looked and contacted various breeders about it being possible to Obtain an collie puppy even though I live in an apartment. Every breeder I have contacted said it wasn't possible but I am determined to get one. I have my heart set on this breed and I know they aren't the best for apartments but I can offer a good home and all the time needed. If anyone knows any (or are!) reputable breeders who don't mind my situation and wouldn't mind giving me a Border Collie puppy please comment below. I live in South East London and I'm prepared to take a maximum 3 hour journey.
Thanks,
 

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Going to be the evil person again and point out that "selling a BC puppy to a teenager, living in an apartment as their first dog" disqualifies someone from being a responsible BC breeder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I may have not owned a dog but I have had experiences with them. I taught my aunts dog to sit in less than a week. I have also made a little book with tips on training from my friends that have dogs and I have s
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I may have not owned a dog but I have had experiences with them. I taught my aunts dog to sit in less than a week. I have also made a little book with tips on training from my friends that have dogs and I have spent the last few months researching potty training, how to do sit ext.
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Uhh, yeah. You even with, you are still searching for a unicorn here. Honestly, the only people living in apartments a reputable breeder would consider are those who already have experience with multiple border collies. They are not city dogs, and they are certainly not apartment dogs.

Look, I understand you love the breed however it's just not going to work with your current circumstances. Get some experience with a lower-maintenance dog first, then get yourself in circumstances where you are setting yourself up for success with the breed.

The ones you are in now? You are setting yourself up for failure. That isn't fair to you and it's not fair to the hypothetical dog you would be putting in a bad situation.

I know you are young, but have patience. What with high school and university coming up, the time will go by quickly.

I'm not saying never get a border collie - I'm saying don't get a border collie now.

Getting it now, in those circumstances is selfish and unfair to the dog.
 

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I taught my stubborn breed dog to pick his toys off the floor and put them in a basket in 2 days. Two days...and there's no way I could own a border collie. My father used to train many of these for a breeder to work on farms. They have such a focus about them.

If you are a teenager (don't know where failed slacker got that but you didn't argue) then are you going to go to college and leave the dog on your parents soon? If so, it doesn't matter how ready you are...your parents could end up being responsible. They may not be as willing as you are to give the dog what he needs. If you are a teenager, you're about to head into some awesome years where being responsible for such a high needs breed could be a huge burden. You're only young once!

I really wanted a dog in college but couldn't b/c I lived in dorms on scholarship and couldn't afford to pay rent somewhere. I wanted one even more once I got an apartment that allowed them but I didn't have the time to devote. I had to wait until I was 23 to finally be in a place where I could afford a dog and also devote attention to it. I understand where you are coming from but sometimes you gotta put the animal's welfare over your desires. I'm not saying NEVER...but just think about it really long and hard. If a reputable breeder won't sell one to you, there's a reason. Be patient and your time will come. My first grown up dog was worth the wait.
 

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I taught my stubborn breed dog to pick his toys off the floor and put them in a basket in 2 days. Two days...and there's no way I could own a border collie. My father used to train many of these for a breeder to work on farms. They have such a focus about them.

If you are a teenager (don't know where failed slacker got that but you didn't argue) then are you going to go to college and leave the dog on your parents soon? If so, it doesn't matter how ready you are...your parents could end up being responsible. They may not be as willing as you are to give the dog what he needs. If you are a teenager, you're about to head into some awesome years where being responsible for such a high needs breed could be a huge burden. You're only young once!

I really wanted a dog in college but couldn't b/c I lived in dorms on scholarship and couldn't afford to pay rent somewhere. I wanted one even more once I got an apartment that allowed them but I didn't have the time to devote. I had to wait until I was 23 to finally be in a place where I could afford a dog and also devote attention to it. I understand where you are coming from but sometimes you gotta put the animal's welfare over your desires. I'm not saying NEVER...but just think about it really long and hard. If a reputable breeder won't sell one to you, there's a reason. Be patient and your time will come. My first grown up dog was worth the wait.
I got it from his previous post on the matter.

He asked us for our advice on if it could be done, got a resounding no, and apparently decided to ignore said advice.
 

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Yes and lemme add in my experience with my dad's BCs and the ones he trained, they seemed to have no interest in being my pet. I was a kid and they allowed me to pet them but there was a difference between them and every other dog we had come through in that they seemed to tolerate it and not thrive on it. They worked on a farm herding...the border collie dream life. Not saying they cannot bond with people because they can and do...but saying that given the option of being doted on by a person or working along side one, they choose work. My dad was not an affectionate person but they chose him because he provided their job. When my uncle died unexpectedly (also a former and he had horses) his bc grieved himself to death even though there were still people in the house so they definitely can form a tight bond but it might not be what you are expecting and they might not choose you if you are away all day...
 

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marbear,
You make me think of an old BC saying: A BC loves the one who works him, not the one who feeds him.
BC's tend to be "one man dogs", bred thru the ages to bond closely to the shepherd who they worked with, not the family. So OP like marbear said, if you aren't the person who's home the most, you might not become your dogs "chosen person" which would defy the object. But since you probably aren't going to listen to good advice I have just this to say: Good Luck! to you and the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks BorderCollie.Whenever I tell people I live in an apartment and want a border collie they tend to scowl and get angry.People forget that I have a family and that even though the dog is mainly mine my family will care for it as well as me. I will go to six form and live with my patents until I'm at least 18. If I'm ever busy doing homework my sister would take it out to the park. I know I can bring the puppy up to be a delightful dog just to prove I can. But please does any one actually know any breeders that would consider giving my family a bc puppy?
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You do realize a puppy from a reputablee breeder can be extremely expensive, like, I mean 1000 and up? Are your parents willing to pay that? Then there's the neuter/spay, because a reputable breeder will have you fix your pet - add another 250 upward there. Now food per month... can be very expensive.. if your dog gets sick and has to go to the vet... another big amount of money... lot's of money. Look, trust me - I'm a teen and I know how you feel... but I highly suggest a smaller breed from a rescue, or perhaps a collie mix - and not a puppy - puppies are way overated and difficult. Then when you are older, and have had your own dog to take care of - you can decided yourself to get your dream dog ;)
 
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