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My dog, whose liver, according to the vet, is "shot" has just been put on 10 mg of Vetoryl a day. I have been reading the specs on this medication and they turn suddenly nightmarish at the point where the side effects get listed.

Has anyone had any run ins with this medication?
 

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I think I need a bit more information. Vetoryl is to treat cushings. Has your dog been diagnosed with cushings? How long has the dog been on it? Is the vet following up or planning to follow up with ACTH stimulation tests? How old is this dog?

If the dog's liver is "shot", having it on Vetoryl is sort of playing with fire. I'm not sure how bad "shot" is, but Vetoryl can affect the liver with long term use, and is often not recommend for dogs with hepatic or renal failure. Is he on Denamarin for his liver? Or milk thistle? Or a hepatic diet?

Most dogs I've encountered at work (I'm a vet tech) seem to do very well on Vetoryl. One boarder is also on Denamarin for his liver, but his liver values aren't terrible for being a 14 year old dog. And they may have even put him on Denamarin as a preventative measure with the Vetoryl. But I'd definitely be concerned about his liver. It can get to the point where you have to pick which of the two evils is lesser....Keeping him on Vetoryl and risking his liver going out even faster, or not treating the cushings to keep his liver working longer. I couldn't say which is better because it depends on the dog and how bad the cushings is and how bad the liver is, how old the dog is etc. There's always a trade off.
 

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I think I need a bit more information. Vetoryl is to treat cushings. Has your dog been diagnosed with cushings? How long has the dog been on it? Is the vet following up or planning to follow up with ACTH stimulation tests? How old is this dog?

If the dog's liver is "shot", having it on Vetoryl is sort of playing with fire. I'm not sure how bad "shot" is, but Vetoryl can affect the liver with long term use, and is often not recommend for dogs with hepatic or renal failure. Is he on Denamarin for his liver? Or milk thistle? Or a hepatic diet?

Most dogs I've encountered at work (I'm a vet tech) seem to do very well on Vetoryl. One boarder is also on Denamarin for his liver, but his liver values aren't terrible for being a 14 year old dog. And they may have even put him on Denamarin as a preventative measure with the Vetoryl. But I'd definitely be concerned about his liver. It can get to the point where you have to pick which of the two evils is lesser....Keeping him on Vetoryl and risking his liver going out even faster, or not treating the cushings to keep his liver working longer. I couldn't say which is better because it depends on the dog and how bad the cushings is and how bad the liver is, how old the dog is etc. There's always a trade off.
My dog is 15 years old. She has just been diagnosed with Cushings. She is not on Denamarin or milk thistle nor is she on a hepatic diet regime.

I can't say for sure how shot "shot" is. The vet says that her blood work revealed high levels of...what I can't say, but these revelations signaled that her liver was pretty far gone. She is not eating and has lost a lot of weight over the past year or so, gradually but precipitously in the last month.

She is getting 10 mg of Vetoryl a day. Vet wants to see her in three weeks. The reason I am concerned is not only the issue of side effects indicated for all categories of dog, but the warning of particular danger when used with dogs with liver conditions. I can't reach the vet until Monday. I was supposed to start her on Vetoryl today and in fact I did give her her first dose--swathed in peanut butter which is the only thing she will eat these days and not much of that.

I am hesitating to do any more Vetoryl on her--she is also on an antibiotic for gum infection. She is too frail to have this gum/tooth problem addressed in any other way. I just hate to keep medicating a dog who doesn't have the equipment anymore to metabolize the drugs.
 

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My dog is 15 years old. She has just been diagnosed with Cushings. She is not on Denamarin or milk thistle nor is she on a hepatic diet regime.

I can't say for sure how shot "shot" is. The vet says that her blood work revealed high levels of...what I can't say, but these revelations signaled that her liver was pretty far gone. She is not eating and has lost a lot of weight over the past year or so, gradually but precipitously in the last month.

She is getting 10 mg of Vetoryl a day. Vet wants to see her in three weeks. The reason I am concerned is not only the issue of side effects indicated for all categories of dog, but the warning of particular danger when used with dogs with liver conditions. I can't reach the vet until Monday. I was supposed to start her on Vetoryl today and in fact I did give her her first dose--swathed in peanut butter which is the only thing she will eat these days and not much of that.

I am hesitating to do any more Vetoryl on her--she is also on an antibiotic for gum infection. She is too frail to have this gum/tooth problem addressed in any other way. I just hate to keep medicating a dog who doesn't have the equipment anymore to metabolize the drugs.
Yeah your concerns are definitely very valid.

I would definitely talk to the vet about the overall benefits of doing this in relation to your goals for her. Treating cushings doesn't necessarily extend life....It just reduces the sometimes unpleasant side effects of the cushings disease. If she's already suffering unpleasant side effects from cushings, then treating with Vetoryl might be the only way to keep her comfortable, even if it does shorten her life because of her failing liver. But if the cushings doesn't seem to be bothering her, or you feel that the side effects aren't affecting her quality of life just yet, then letting it go untreated might be the right decision.
 

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Yeah your concerns are definitely very valid.

I would definitely talk to the vet about the overall benefits of doing this in relation to your goals for her. Treating cushings doesn't necessarily extend life....It just reduces the sometimes unpleasant side effects of the cushings disease. If she's already suffering unpleasant side effects from cushings, then treating with Vetoryl might be the only way to keep her comfortable, even if it does shorten her life because of her failing liver. But if the cushings doesn't seem to be bothering her, or you feel that the side effects aren't affecting her quality of life just yet, then letting it go untreated might be the right decision.
Thanks for this information. It gives me a basis on which to continue researching . She has not been suffering. I am watching closely to see how she is taking this latest intervention.
 

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Cushing's disease usually makes a specific enzyme called ALP get extremely elevated. Not because the liver is "shot" but because the excess steroids cause what is called enzyme induction, they stimulate the liver to make more ALP. As the Cushing's comes under control, the ALP should fall.

I would clarify with your vet exactly what "shot" means. That's not very useful information. :/
 

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Cushing's disease usually makes a specific enzyme called ALP get extremely elevated. Not because the liver is "shot" but because the excess steroids cause what is called enzyme induction, they stimulate the liver to make more ALP. As the Cushing's comes under control, the ALP should fall.

I would clarify with your vet exactly what "shot" means. That's not very useful information. :/
I agree. She is not responding well so far to Vetoryl. It seems to be weakening her.
 
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