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I consider Chisum to be well housetrained. He never pees indoors, and only has a (very, very rare) poo accident if we don't adhere to his surprisingly regimented schedule.

Until now, anyway.

Up to this point, my brother was living at home and finishing his degree but he has since moved out. Both parents work, I work/go to school so Chisum is relegated to a room with a tile floor during the day for about 7-8 hours between when I leave and when my mother gets home from work.

He's very good about holding his poo, but he pees in the room daily now (this new schedule was implemented Tuesday). I don't really fault him, as he's used to being able to go out every few hours or so and *I* can't go all day without going to the bathroom either. I'm pretty sure he doesn't sleep in the room; he's not destructive but has issues with being left so while I'm not totally sure what he does in there I know he's not relaxed as he won't touch his food until we get home.

Anyway, has anyone actually had any luck with potty pads or training patches of some kind? I usually don't think they work but I'm at a loss here. He always goes in the same spot - right in front of the door - so I didn't know if I could offer that as an alternative.

A dog walker of any kind is out of the question as he's highly reactive and we live way out in the country so I'm almost certain no one services our area anyway. I'm not really keen on any kind of outdoor kennel either - I don't think he'd like it any better and I'm too paranoid he'd get out or get stolen...you just never know.

Ideas/suggestions appreciated!
 

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I consider Chisum to be well housetrained. He never pees indoors, and only has a (very, very rare) poo accident if we don't adhere to his surprisingly regimented schedule.

Until now, anyway.

Up to this point, my brother was living at home and finishing his degree but he has since moved out. Both parents work, I work/go to school so Chisum is relegated to a room with a tile floor during the day for about 7-8 hours between when I leave and when my mother gets home from work.

He's very good about holding his poo, but he pees in the room daily now (this new schedule was implemented Tuesday). I don't really fault him, as he's used to being able to go out every few hours or so and *I* can't go all day without going to the bathroom either. I'm pretty sure he doesn't sleep in the room; he's not destructive but has issues with being left so while I'm not totally sure what he does in there I know he's not relaxed as he won't touch his food until we get home.

Anyway, has anyone actually had any luck with potty pads or training patches of some kind? I usually don't think they work but I'm at a loss here. He always goes in the same spot - right in front of the door - so I didn't know if I could offer that as an alternative.

A dog walker of any kind is out of the question as he's highly reactive and we live way out in the country so I'm almost certain no one services our area anyway. I'm not really keen on any kind of outdoor kennel either - I don't think he'd like it any better and I'm too paranoid he'd get out or get stolen...you just never know.

Ideas/suggestions appreciated!
How old is the dog? I don't like pee pads as it encourages them to pee inside. You need to crate train the dog, not sure if he has one already? He won't pee inside it as long as there is just enough room to be comfy. Make sure you are really cleaning his pee spots. I've had to use vinegar and baking soda while potty training my pup or she'd go right to that spot and do it again. She's crate trained so when we cant watch her, she's in there with a few toys for hard chewers and never once has pee'd or pooped in it. She's nine months now. If he's never been crate trained make it the best thing in the world to get him use to it when you are home. Throw toys in in for him to retrieve, close the crate when he's in in for a few minutes and give him a high value treat etc. Add more time to these exercises till he's able to chill out for an hour or so. Reward him afterwards with a walk. If he ever barks in the crate and you know he's already eaten and gone to the washroom etc, IGNORE it. Lucy did that once and I let her out and that was a big mistake because she learned from it. I had a couple of weeks of ignoring her while she was in it to break that habit lol. Good luck, but I really think crate training is the best way to go. 7-8 hours is not bad so long as it's not longer than that without someone coming by to let him out at least once.
 

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See, I don't like pads for that reason either.

We tried crate training in the past. He'd go in and chill if I was in the room, which I rewarded heavily. We worked really hard on getting the door closed and remaining calm, slowly walking toward the door, then out the door, etc. We hit a wall because even though I took it as slowly as I could, as soon as I was out of sight he threw a serious fit - not just barking, but screaming and throwing himself at the door of the crate. I was afraid he would hurt himself. After that, we had to start all over because even if I was in the same room and *looked* like I was about to leave, he panicked again. And we'd always hit the same snag when I left the room.

I tried feeding him in his crate, but he'd only eat if I were in the same room (or nearby after that first freak out). Now, when he's left in the room when we leave, I leave him his breakfast as well but he doesn't touch it until I get home. He's a food hound, so when he doesn't eat he's clearly stressed -- with his other fear/anxiety related issues I'm not surprised and am honestly lucky he isn't destructive.

He doesn't pee daily in there, he can hold it too. I'm always sure to leave him water, but not too much as he drinks when he's stressed which will then make him pee. It may just be down to how much water I leave with him for the time I'm away; I'll just experiment and see.
 

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I think the issue is he has to get used to a new schedule -- it may take some time, but in the meantime, you also have to alter his schedule. Like you said, you can't hold it all day - lol - so I suggest that for now, no water in the morning, unless you/someone will be home for 2 hours after his last sip. This is only until he consistently is dry for quite awhile and has total control -- which he hasn't had to worry about until recently. Whoever is home before the last person leaves for the day, should make sure he pees at least twice during their prep time; it is essential that he is as 'dry' as possible before the last person leaves. Since, Chisum is over a year old, he can hold it, but has never had to -- so it will take a little getting used to. When someone is home, start lengthening the amount of time between potty breaks -- but not too long -- and of course, if he asks to go out, let him. Again, the key is the amount of water he has been given and the amount of time you have given him to make sure 'all of it is out'. :) I wouldn't do the pee-pads -- I don't think that will help -- in fact, it may encourage him loose his house-breaking skills. He understands what is needed, you just have to now re-train his bladder. :) good luck.
 

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I have a friend who's dog is trained to go on pee pads. Her and her husband both work and are gone for most of the day so they figured it was the best way to go. The drawback that I've noticed is that the dog always goes on the pads even when the owners are home and could take her out, it's not like she understands they are not home so I should go on the pad, they are home so I should ask to go out. I'm really not sure if a pad train dog could grasp that concept.

If you want to give it a try I'd get extra large pads and some sort of tray to put it in. The tray because if Chisum is pacing in the room he's likely to scrunch up the pad and render it useless, the extra large pads because if he's like my boy he's liable to miss the pad. Zody's aim is between his front paws. Pick a spot as close to where he is currently going since he seems to want to go there, make it obvious that that's his potty spot. My friend picked the bathroom as her dog's potty spot, so now if she goes to somebody elses home with the dog, like MiL or grandmothers house she'll bring the pad and put it in the bathroom and her dog knows to go there. I'm thinking the dog associates bathroom fixtures with potty spot. train Chisum to use the pad like you would train him to potty outside.
 
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See, I don't like pads for that reason either.

We tried crate training in the past. He'd go in and chill if I was in the room, which I rewarded heavily. We worked really hard on getting the door closed and remaining calm, slowly walking toward the door, then out the door, etc. We hit a wall because even though I took it as slowly as I could, as soon as I was out of sight he threw a serious fit - not just barking, but screaming and throwing himself at the door of the crate. I was afraid he would hurt himself. After that, we had to start all over because even if I was in the same room and *looked* like I was about to leave, he panicked again. And we'd always hit the same snag when I left the room.

I tried feeding him in his crate, but he'd only eat if I were in the same room (or nearby after that first freak out). Now, when he's left in the room when we leave, I leave him his breakfast as well but he doesn't touch it until I get home. He's a food hound, so when he doesn't eat he's clearly stressed -- with his other fear/anxiety related issues I'm not surprised and am honestly lucky he isn't destructive.

He doesn't pee daily in there, he can hold it too. I'm always sure to leave him water, but not too much as he drinks when he's stressed which will then make him pee. It may just be down to how much water I leave with him for the time I'm away; I'll just experiment and see.
Hmmm, what if you practice going in and out of the room and reward him while he's in the crate? So he knows you will return at some point. Also, I've always been told to never make a big deal of leaving. I do that with Lucy in the morning, "See ya soon" and she's great about it. Don worry he will come around.
 

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Just thought of something else. Are you positive that he is not peeing because he's stressed, anxious?

I've seen that happen in my dog Shadow after he went blind. He developed pretty bad anxiety when I had to leave him alone and would pee because of it. He was fully housetrained but after he went blind I could take him out right before I left, leave him for 10 minutes, and come back to a puddle on my floor.
 

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It could be stress, though he doesn't always do it. When it happens, it's usually a LOT, like a full bladder empty.

I may try restricting the water and see how it goes. It may just be an issue of me leaving him too much, he drinks it all, then has to go to the bathroom.

I wish I could make it more pleasant for him to be left but it's easier said than done especially as he won't touch any goodies I leave for him. At least he's not destructive.
 

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Random crate training suggestion: My aunt has a Aussie that has severe separation anxiety (he would lick the paint clear off her walls) so she has found that a treat and train sat on top with the tray removed (so it drops treats randomly throughout the day) was really helpful. Now Dakota still uses this when she is gone but he is able to have a Kong too and this his crate IS AWESOME because he gets treats in it.
 

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Most everyone has already brought up my thoughts but I will add my pee pad experience.

Growing up, my grandparents had yorkies. I mean dozens, of yorkies. All ridiculously well cared for, they obsessed over them in their retirement. They used pee pads on top of having an outside, elaborate fenced yard for them. Eventually the dogs learned that yes, pee pads were okay to be peed on - And if for some reason it was cold, or they didn't want to go outside with the others, they could just pee on the pads.

And their house smelled. Horribly. To this day (They are down to four dogs now) it still smells awful. Even when most of them were clean, if one dog would pee it would bring the whole smell back up again. I hated it.
 

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A little late to the party, but I hope it's okay for me to post this, just in case others are curious about potty pads....

we use them with our chihuahua for two reasons-- one being that it's often way too cold for a chihuahua to stand out in the cold while I try to get him to pee in the winter, and the other being that he was already on his way to puppy pad training with his old owner and we thought it would be the best thing to embrace for now since he is already almost a year old and has never been potty-trained.

This might be useful in concerns to the smell....
We only allow one puppy pad in a low plastic box. Since he's small, his box is also small, and we actually cut the puppy pad into fourths and layer two of them to cover the bottom of the box. When he goes in it, we immediately remove and flush poo, and for pee we replace one or both of the layers of padding. We bought a small metal trash can with a seal-able lid for like $11 at Walmart, and it's special just for his waste-- which prevents the smell of old pads from escaping into the house. If you're near a door to the garage or outside, you can even store the trash can outside.

We always keep the door to the room open so any potential odor does not build up inside the room, and use a baby gate if we don't want him wondering around the house. We also use candles, wax burners, oil burners, etc. at times-- but usually we don't need to, and we have never had a smell issue.

but he is only one dog, a tiny dog at that, and we have been able to clean it up immediately every time. This may not work for everyone, especially if the issue is that you're sometimes not home...
When we used a similar method out our old home before we became his official new family, it worked much more poorly. We were using multiple pads, unable to clean it up right away, the door was almost always closed because we had no gates back then, and the trashcan was a normal wicker one with no lid. It DID smell then, but with the changes we've made now that he is ours, we have no issues.
 

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on consistency of successful use for those who care....
We have had some trials with ours-- but again, he is an almost 1-year-old dog who has never been properly potty-trained, so some issues are expected. He has successfully used them off-and-on, and is currently back to the using them properly side... this is also my first experience potty-training all on my own, potty-training a grown dog, and potty-training a tiny dog with strange potty habits and food habits that my big dogs didn't have-- so I'm sure some of his off-spells were my fault, while others were just the way it is when trying to potty-train a grown dog. But others here can vouch for the ability to train a dog to use potty pads successfully, while I can vouch for the ability to use them without a horrible-smelling home.
 
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