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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I am looking for information on heartworms. A dog at the shelter near where I live is heartworm positive and getting looked over because of that but she is a wonderful dog and I am very much in love. Can anyone give me some more advice on heartworms like treatment cost or typical treatment procedure? Thanks. The dog is 42 lbs. thanks!
 

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The cost of treatment is going to vary, and the same treatment will vary from state to state, city to city, and even vet to vet in the same city. It will also depend on which treatment type you go with. The fast kill method is more expensive then the slow kill method. If the dog has trouble with the treatment and needs to be hospitalized the cost can go up a lot. Call around your area and ask about the prices of heartworm treatment, that will give you a starting point on how much it is going to cost, but be prepared financially in case she has a negative reaction to the treatment and has to have emergency care.

The fast kill method is more expensive, and a bit more harsh, but it has the benefit that the dog does not have to be on crate rest for a long period of time. If your dog is high energy this method maybe better. This is the treatment I did when I had to treat my rescue dog for heartworm.


The slow kill method is cheaper, but since it slowly kills off the worms the dog has to be on crate rest for a longer period of time. That could drive you and the dog crazy if the dog is high energy. I choose this treatment when the heartworm preventive I had my elderly dog on failed and his test showed he had heartworm.

Both methods are harsh, and both carry the risk that something could go wrong as the worms die off, so you have to monitor the dog throughout the treatment. The heavier the worm burden the greater the chance that something could go wrong during treatment.

Don't let it put you off adopting that dog! My Jersey (the rescue dog) did fine with the treatment and lived a good 10 years after treatment. She was a great dog and I never regretted adopting her and having to pay for that treatment. Shadow (elderly dog) also did fine with the treatment, lived for another year after treatment and passed away from old age, he was 17 year 8 months when he passed away.
 

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You should be able to call a vet in your area and get a general idea of price. For Mac I think it was about $900.00 The slow method does require keeping the dog calm for months which even for my old fellow wasn't easy.
I agree with Rain I would not let heartworms stop me from adopting.
 

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Heartworms are one of the most renowned parasites that your pup can get. It is delivered by mosquitos when they feed off your pup and the larva enters the bloodstream. The worms collect primarily in the heart and associated areas, hence the name heartworm. Preventative measures are common as veterinarians vaccinate regularly and offer treatments for this condition.

These parasites can definitely ruin your pup’s day. The best preventative measure you can do is to make sure your pup gets their regular shots and vaccinations. Aside from that, it is recommended that you keep your yard clear of fecal material. If you have a grass litter box, be sure to be consistent in clearing poop. Because these parasites can transfer to us humans as well, cover up playground equipment and sand boxes to prevent other animals from doing their business there. Keep your pup vaccinated and keep your yard clear of parasites so that your pup will be able to enjoy a healthy lifestyle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I wouldn't let it discourage me from adoption, it's just something to consider as I'm a teacher and don't make bundles of money and this seems expensive...I know all about preventative measures and I agree with them wholeheartedly, this dog at the shelter just already has them. Any more advice appreciated. Does anyone have a preference for slow kill over fast kill?
 

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Yes, I wouldn't let it discourage me from adoption, it's just something to consider as I'm a teacher and don't make bundles of money and this seems expensive...I know all about preventative measures and I agree with them wholeheartedly, this dog at the shelter just already has them. Any more advice appreciated. Does anyone have a preference for slow kill over fast kill?

My preference depends on the activity level of the dog, and cost also factors in with me.

If Shadow, the dog I treated when he was elderly, had been young when he got the heartworms I'd have had to choose the fast kill treatment. He was way to hyper and active to even think about keeping him quiet for the months you have to with the slow kill method. I think I'd either have ended up strangling him or going crazy trying the slow kill method back then LOL.

Jersey, the rescue dog, I might have been able to treat with the slow kill method, she wasn't as hyper or active like Shadow was and was much more laid back, but since I had the money I went with the fast kill method, I figure might as well get it over with quick rather then drag it out and needlessly keep her on limited activity for such a long time.
 

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heya petlover6, im new to the forum and im sure a lot of good advices will be posted here for you... I did a research for you with the good old google :) i believe it depends on the severity of the illness :( some costs cheap ... best to contact your local vet though so that they can check his/her blood work :( i hope the pup will get well soon ...
 
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