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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
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India has hordes of non-humans in urban & village areas, all roaming freely - cattle to forage on scraps or eat newspapers & banana-peels & coffee-grounds, donkeys, horses, feral dogs around villages, street dogs within villages or cities - & inevitably, stuff happens.

Being HBC / Hit By Car is one huge risk, but as U will see in the video, uncovered water hazards ranging from disused wells to cesspits for sewage to natural pools used as waste pits for refuse, are common. Drowning or dying of hypothermia in the water [or under the floating trash] is a bad end.
Getting stuck is another common plight - a head trapped in a jug, or trapped in a fence, or falling bodily into a window-well & being unable to climb or jump out, is practically an everyday event, in a mid-sized city.



NOTE what the rescuers DO NOT have:
- they don't have catch-poles, to lasso an animal safely & reduce their bite-risk.
- they don't have muzzles.
- no gauntlets to protect their precious hands.
- they don't have crates, nor built-in cages in their trucks, to transport rescued animals to a shelter.
- they don't have rescue-harnesses to lift a trapped cow, a horse, a donkey, safely - with less risk of broken legs or severe skin-injuries, or even broken necks or spines.
- they don't have a shelter to house dogs, or for that matter, injured or ill cattle, lame equines, the starved, the sick.
They get them out of the immediate situation, & let them go - skinned-up, bruised, near-throttled, chilled, whatever.
- they don't have a vet at their facility; there's no facility, & no vet on call.


What DO they have?
Guts - to get up close & personal with a terrified animal, & no protective gear.
A deep desire to help. Compassion by the ton.
Blankets or tarps to throw over a terrified animal, to help calm them & prevent thrashing.
Simple ropes to put around a trapped animal's body, & draw them out of the hole they are trapped in.
Small amounts of food to reassure a scared animal that they mean no harm, & establish a tentative trust.

Being kicked, gored, bitten, butted & having Ur rib-cage crushed, stomped, pinned against a wall & seriously injured, or getting killed when the rope slips & the animal falls back in atop U, are all potential risks, here. The smells that cannot be translated here, are unbelievably foul; if U've never experienced a rotting cess-pit in the heat of summer, be thankful to whatever Divine U recognize for that tender mercy.

God bless them - & i think She does. :)
- terry

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I can't watch the video at the moment, but as I have a 'village type' dog and 'follow' on Facebook the activities of his rescuers, so I'm always interested in hearing about his 'cousins' around the world. They do work hard, and see a lot of horrible things but remain full of compassion.
Sonic is, I guess, luckier than these Indian dogs. His rescuers are Canadian ex-pats, they cobble together resources & funding & get them vetted, spayed/neutered, shots, additional food, education (for the owners if owned) etc. & eventually, some of the make it into the frozen to live a quality of life that surpasses that of their local humans--now there's some irony to contemplate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
the Blue Cross & rabies - the scourge of India

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India has a wonderful non-profit that does truly gargantuan labor, the Blue Cross - they are trying to reduce the number of rabies-cases across the subcontinent, & actually succeeding.

Blue Cross of India - Animal Rescue, Hospital, Shelter & ABC-Rabies

The British method of periodic wholesale poisonings to try to eradicate street dogs, feral dogs, & village dogs, not only killed huge numbers of innocent animals who did NOT have rabies, but it also killed "non-targets" - owned dogs who roamed free, for a few minutes or a few hours, or even dogs on leash, or in their HOME GARDENS, could easily pick-up & eat the poisoned baits, which were broadcast everywhere - public & private property. alike.
Plus of course wildlife of many species died - the Brits regarded this as unfortunate, but felt collateral damage was inevitable, & that mass poisoning was "the only way" to effectively deal with strays or born-on-the-street ownerless dogs.

They tried it & kept trying it, long-after it was patently obvious that it didn't work!, for over a century; the dog-popn would fall locally after one poisoning campaign, dogs would move in from outlying areas, they'd breed, & the popn would go right back up. :(

The Blue Cross addresses it from the other end - they catch dogs, S/N them, GIVE THEM RABIES VAX, & release them. The vaccinated dogs in villages & towns are readily recognized by their tipped ears; they provide a buffer between unvaccinated dogs & local citizens.
Over 90% of human-rabies cases in India result from dog bites - even owned pet-dogs are rarely vaccinated, a very-slowly changing practice.

Their goal in Sept-2013 was 50K dogs vaxed in 30-days; they actually EXCEEDED it, with another 10K dogs vaxed over that period -
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/chennai/mission-rabies-vaccinates-stray-dogs-across-india/article5123086.ece

The Blue Cross has succeeded in reducing India's terrifying rabies problem [I refer to human cases - approx 25K ppl died of rabies across India in 1985, & 25 to 30K died every year for DECADES on end] to near-nil in the areas where they've been allowed to work; several provinces have had entire calendar-years without one human rabies-case, which was previously unheard-of.

this is a 2014 editorial from the World Health Org -
WHO | Human rabies in India: a problem needing more attention

Poor ppl in India, especially in rural areas, are very unlikely to have access to a hospital that stocks the rabies-serum... so when they are bitten, they wait in terror to see if they will live - or die. :headshake:
If they develop neurological symptoms, they are going to die. // It's heartrending.

The Blue Cross have been astonishingly effective - everyone pooh-poohed them even B4 they began, but they have done wonderful work. IMO, they're a model for anywhere that has large numbers of roaming strays ... the Philippines, Greek islands, the Middle East, Moscow, the Caribbean, Romania, Bulgaria, & similar settings.

- terry

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Discussion Starter #4
animal welfare, rabies, & human welfare are entwined

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in 2017, human-rabies cases in India had fallen by 30% in just 4-years -
2014 to 2017, which is incredible.

Rabies deaths down by a third in three years in India, but snakebites continue to kill | health | Hindustan Times

an elderly man died of rabies 5 years after being bitten by a dog -
India reports human rabies death, five years after dog bite - Outbreak News Today

the longest rabies-latency I'd heard of previously was 8-years, a young girl in Brazil who'd been bitten by a bat, developed active rabies 8-yrs later, & died; there was a reported case in India of someone dying of rabies 25-years after being bitten.

Indian man dies from rabies 25 years after dog bite | The Global Dispatch


The Blue Cross is India's leading animal-welfare organization, working to alleviate suffering on many fronts, from overworked or underfed draft animals to abandoned elderly cows, half-starved & scavenging in the streets; they promote humane standards for pets, livestock, & wildlife, do rescue work daily for animals in distress, & support legislation to prevent suffering in non-humans.

- terry

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