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alternatives? // Pumpkin as a "bland diet" ingredient

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of course, other high-fiber foods exist - but whole-wheat, other whole grains, beans, WHOLE KERNEL corn, etc, all have higher carbs in proportion to their fiber content.
Dogs will gladly eat any of them, but they'll eat a lot of calories, with that fiber - & cup for cup, compared to pumpkin, there's less fiber in any of them.

There's also wheat BRAN, rice BRAN, & similar "roughage" supplements, or simply add BeneFiber - or psyllium husks.
But none have the palatability & appeal of pumpkin, which 99 of 100 dogs will eat by the cupful, given the opp. :p

Popcorn is low-cal & high in insoluble fiber, so long as it's eaten naked. But it has no soluble fiber content.


Canned pumpkin is also soothing to an irritated bowel - which most high-roughage foods are not. It can help ease diarrhea, intestinal cramps,

https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2014/09/01/pumpkin-dietary-fiber.aspx

as a bland diet, Dr Becker advocates canned pumpkin [instead of high-glycemic, low-fiber white rice] & fat-free white meat turkey [rather than mixed white-&-dark chicken, or fatty ground beef].

all in all, pumpkin's great stuff, IME.
- terry

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Of course but the OP is reluctant to start the dog on a raw diet.

You don't need to start the dog on a raw diet to give them raw bones. I give them to my dog for his teeth, usually I feed them in the morning so that he's fasted given the back and forth on mixing raw with kibble.
 

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Of course.

I was somewhat assuming the reluctance of the OP to feed a raw diet was maybe based upon the introduction of whole bones hence my suggestion in my earlier post suggesting the supplementation of proper bone meal in the dog's kibble or otherwise non-raw diet.

My assumption above is probably incorrect but most people who I know who are a bit uptight about starting a raw diet it usually revolves around the bones.

If the attempt to alleviate the situation with the anal glands via hardening up the dog's stool, the addition of bone to a dog's diet will most likely work better than pumpkin. As I mentioned previously, there is no doubt when a raw fed dog is getting too much bone in their diet as their stools come out almost crispy hard and whitish. I'm thinking you know what I mean.
 

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Just wondering, if the pumpkin puree is going to do much, as she already gets some sweet potato every day. Does the pumpkin puree have something the sweet potato doesn't? She is almost on a raw diet, her food is all fresh, but very lightly cooked.
pumpkin seeds sprinkled on food, is also said to be a herbal dewormer also. Im 6 months into this, and seems to be working.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Of course but the OP is reluctant to start the dog on a raw diet.
I would love to start them on raw BUT..... I would like them to do therapy work and I can't have them on full raw if they pass their test and start working. Also I haven't decided where I will source it from yet if they don't end up in therapy work. My pup that has AG issues was only on raw a short while before we moved. I have thought about turkey necks as treats because if they are off raw for a certain number of days before seeing patients they can work.
 

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I would love to start them on raw BUT..... I would like them to do therapy work and I can't have them on full raw if they pass their test and start working. Also I haven't decided where I will source it from yet if they don't end up in therapy work. My pup that has AG issues was only on raw a short while before we moved. I have thought about turkey necks as treats because if they are off raw for a certain number of days before seeing patients they can work.
Good for you for providing a therapy dog to this world, they provide such benefit. My mother always so much enjoyed the "cute little doggy" that would make a visit occasional when she was in the hospital.

I remember Delta Society making the rule a while ago regarding raw fed therapy animals and I was a bit surprised but maybe their ties ($$$) to the major kibble producers might have influenced their decision, who knows, nobody asked me.

I'm curious, I know there are other therapy dog institutions besides the Delta Society but did all the rest of them follow the ban on raw diets as well?

It's too bad you have the dilemma of having the dietary restrictions for your future therapy dog(s) but FWIW, it's a worthy trade off in my book for the pluses therapy dogs provide.
 
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