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Discussion Starter #1
Im looking for my second dog and im looking for some info on Amstaffs. Im looking for someone who has first hand experience with this breed, not someone who has heard about them or had a bother whos friend has one.
So general questions, how will they do with cats, other dog, kids, apartment living, and how much exercise will they need.
Any other info is appreciated also. Thanks
 

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Usually not good with cats and other "prey" animals, often not good with other dogs, often not good with kids under 10, they have a lot of energy and need a lot of exercise and they need a "job" or else they can be destructive. May not be suitable for an apartment. Unless in an enclosed yard, never walk it off-leash or else it could chase and maul neighbor's animal.
 

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Looks like they're asking pretty clearly about amstaffs, @Alexp08

I've encountered more than a few staffies, but none of them were purebred. I found them to be very high energy, very friendly, very prey driven and given to accidentally knocking over small kids. They are very powerful dogs for their size! It is very possible to socialize a puppy to accept THEIR cats but may chase and hunt other people's cats, if you get one and have cats don't leave them alone together just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Looks like they're asking pretty clearly about amstaffs, @Alexp08

I've encountered more than a few staffies, but none of them were purebred. I found them to be very high energy, very friendly, very prey driven and given to accidentally knocking over small kids. They are very powerful dogs for their size! It is very possible to socialize a puppy to accept THEIR cats but may chase and hunt other people's cats, if you get one and have cats don't leave them alone together just in case.
I was the orignal poster. I was asking if the guy that replied to me which he was talking about. Ive read that the pitbull seem to be more of a problem with children then the amstaff
 

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Am staffs are still terriers and are often not fit to live harmoniously with cats or other small animals. Also, they tend to be less dog aggressive than APBTs but those traits still do pup up. So an am staff puppy is not the best first choice if you're looking for cat and dog friendly as they mature.
 

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I was the orignal poster. I was asking if the guy that replied to me which he was talking about. Ive read that the pitbull seem to be more of a problem with children then the amstaff
I can't read, apparently.

But! All pit types are high energy. Broadly, they're ALL not really 'bad with kids' so much as they are very compact, very powerful and high energy dogs and kids are easily run over during an exuberant sprint around the house. Not everyone bothers to teach their new pit-type not to jump, not to run into people, etc. I wouldn't say otherwise they're more dangerous than any other pit type.

Are you interested in a papered AKC amstaff? I might recommend one if you're looking at them seriously. Not breeders, just in general as most non-papered, non-AKC staffies are just pit mutts. Then you'll have a solid lock on the personalities of its parents and grandparents too, possibly even health problems to look for.
 

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Its a must that its AKC. If you know of one near western MD, by all means send me some info on it lol
 

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Why is it a must that it's AKC? Are you looking to show the dog? If not it's a waste of money when you an get a healthier, cheaper AmStaff mix at any shelter that would be put down otherwise. I watch dogs like that get looked over every day at work because they're AmStaff/Pit mixes. There really is minimal if any difference between the two. Show dog wise Pits can be slimmer and a bit taller but personality wise they're extremely close.
 

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Well the shelters near me do not do any typw of tempermant testing so i have no idea what im getting. And im notb going to buy a unregistered dog from a breeder that claims its a amstaff when most likely its a mix
 

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Then go to a private rescue or another shelter. It's the most common breed in any US shelter and you can easily get an 8 week old puppy that was reared in a foster home. Many shelters with litters also have the mother so you can meet probably her as well, just like you would at a good breeder. Seriously, just research more rescues and you're going to find hundreds where you can get a great Pit/Am Staff dog of any size, age, gender or color from a good rescue that behavior tests. I can even find some names of some my shelter sends dogs to that might have dogs in the MD area.
 
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Im looking for my second dog and im looking for some info on Amstaffs. Im looking for someone who has first hand experience with this breed, not someone who has heard about them or had a bother whos friend has one.
So general questions, how will they do with cats, other dog, kids, apartment living, and how much exercise will they need.
Any other info is appreciated also. Thanks
Cats. Can be prey driven, which means chasing after small animals. If they are raised with cats and socialized to them they might see them as part of the family but when it comes to neighborhood cats they might give chase.

Dogs. Depends on the individual, some are very dog social and others have dog aggression issues. The Am Staff has become more of a show bred animal but they still can still be dog aggressive and have fighting instinct. You need to socialize the dog and also take account of their individual personality. Most importantly never leave them unsupervised with another dog or other animals.

Kids. Most adore kids, it's part of the breeds nature. You should use common sense like you would with any other dog. I'd also not advise children being left alone with any dog. Some who are really excitable if they don't live with kids and learn boundaries might knock over our scratch kids. If properly trained or those with a calmer personality will be pretty gentle. Lay down by the kid, sit by the child, play with them. They can tolerate a lot but again apply common sense as they shouldn't have to put up with abuses even if they will.

My experience okay with cats for the most part but would chase other small animals. One particular time at a hotel with grass and shrubs out front there was a rabbit running around and the prey drive really showed. She had to be placed in "sit, stay" but still whined and wagging the tail wanting to chase the rabbit. Caught mice on a regular basis. Was great with goats though. Did enjoy playing with other dogs but wouldn't back down from a fight. Got into a serious fight with extensive injuries on one occasion. Was excellent with kids, made a great Jr Handler dog, would herd kids away from the street, put herself between babies and people she didn't know but not aggressive just keep them from getting close, really gentle overall great with kids is all I can say. Never lived in apartment (10 acres to run on) but it's probably okay if you provide exercise. I'd recommend a daily walk, playing tug or fetch, if you can find a fenced location for them to run that's be excellent. Combine training with play and reward too.

Why is it a must that it's AKC? Are you looking to show the dog? If not it's a waste of money when you an get a healthier, cheaper AmStaff mix at any shelter that would be put down otherwise. I watch dogs like that get looked over every day at work because they're AmStaff/Pit mixes. There really is minimal if any difference between the two. Show dog wise Pits can be slimmer and a bit taller but personality wise they're extremely close.
I understand how there are a lot of Pits in shelters and what it would be like to see them daily, but I also understand that while the two are similar there is enough distinction for one to seek an AmStaff specifically. It is more than just looks, though some people might prefer the Staff look too.
I'm also not sure how one can say "healthier". Unfortunately dogs in shelters are usually from bybs or oops litters which are not likely to be healthier. This doesn't mean they don't deserve a home and no one is saying they will be unhealthy but the odds are in the favor of a well bred dog I think. I'm very against bad breeders and one reason being is health.
I think great dogs can be found in shelters or rescues, I urge people to consider it but sometimes a breeder is more ideal for a person.

Then go to a private rescue or another shelter. It's the most common breed in any US shelter and you can easily get an 8 week old puppy that was reared in a foster home. Many shelters with litters also have the mother so you can meet probably her as well, just like you would at a good breeder. Seriously, just research more rescues and you're going to find hundreds where you can get a great Pit/Am Staff dog of any size, age, gender or color from a good rescue that behavior tests. I can even find some names of some my shelter sends dogs to that might have dogs in the MD area.
Considering how uncommon AmStaff are I find it hard to believe they would be so commonly found in shelters. The less popular the breed, the less likely you are to see them or mixes there of in the shelter. They might be able to find a rescue that has what they are looking for though. Really depends, they will have to decide if they are open to that and look into it.
 

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You might also want to be careful with having an AmStaff puppy around a smaller dog, simply because it may not understand its own strength--it's a puppy, after all--and could accidentally hurt a smaller dog while actually trying to play with it as opposed to trying to hurt it. The same may be true of other breeds, of course. I'm not trying to single out the AmStaff in that regard.
 

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This doesn't really have anything to do with Staffies, but this is your 3rd dog right? You have you lab, then you got your Shiloh Shepherd puppy right?
 

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This doesn't really have anything to do with Staffies, but this is your 3rd dog right? You have you lab, then you got your Shiloh Shepherd puppy right?

This is an old thread, and the OP stated she was looking for her 2nd dog, so I assume she went for the Shiloh over the Staffy.
 

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This is an old thread, and the OP stated she was looking for her 2nd dog, so I assume she went for the Shiloh over the Staffy.
Ah thank you! I was so confused. :p
 

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I have a 4 year old Amstaff (we rescued her when she was approx. 1.5 years old). Let me just say that they are not easy dogs. I imagine that if you get one from a puppy, lots of their potential behavioral issues can be avoided. My pup is HIGH ENERGY! Meaning if she doesn't get tired out every day, she is on edge. She's also highly prey driven.. cats. birds.. any small animal. She would no doubt kill a cat if she ever got close enough to one. That aside, with people she is the biggest love bug I've ever met. She just dies to curl up on the couch with you and cover you in kisses. She's also excitable and doesn't know the extent of her own strength. With time, she's learning to be less rough (unintentionally) with people, especially when new people come to the house.. her excitement is overwhelming! Which can often translate into jumping on people, and depending on the person, she can obviously seem scary (even though she's not). With children and babies she is amazing. She has let a small kid get on her back and "ride" her like a horse, she never shows any signs of annoyance or anger. Never.

With dogs, she can be difficult. In the beginning, she was fine with dogs. Then she got bit a few times in the park, and she started to become more reactive towards dogs. We have to be careful with her. If a dog approaches her and is already on edge, she immediately responds with the same energy. A slight movement between 2 dogs can set her off. With the majority of dogs she can play and play and play for hours on end, and she loves to play with dogs! But the reactiveness is something that you have to constantly have in mind.

I'd say these dogs aren't for people who have never owned a dog before. They take training, lots of exercise, patience, and you have to be ready to respond before any potentially dangerous situation that could occur (even if another dog attacks your dog, you're going to have to step into the situation to separate them which can be scary and overwhelming!

The best thing about Amstaffs is how much they love you and how cuddly they are. They're expressive and smart, and are great companions.
 
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