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Hello all.

I have a 14 month old Pitbull/Boxer mix that was adopted a little more than a month ago. He is up to date on all of his vaccines, is neutered, and has exceptional behavior.

His only flaw is that whenever I arrive home from a long day, he jumps on me and bites my hand. He continues to do so and becomes aggressive. I am the only family member that does this. Occasionally out of nowhere he will do this, and I don't know the cause. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Hello all.

I have a 14 month old Pitbull/Boxer mix that was adopted a little more than a month ago. He is up to date on all of his vaccines, is neutered, and has exceptional behavior.

His only flaw is that whenever I arrive home from a long day, he jumps on me and bites my hand. He continues to do so and becomes aggressive. I am the only family member that does this. Occasionally out of nowhere he will do this, and I don't know the cause. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Sounds like over excitement to me. One of my Rottweilers used to do this to my husband when he came home from work. We redirected to a toy and praised him to the moon and back and gave him pets when he had the toy in his mouth when he was so excited. :)

Do you do any clicker training?

I really recommend these links -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c77--cCHPyU - stop mouthing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lC_OKgQFgzw - stop jumping

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wesm2OpE_2c - capturing calmness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBvPaqMZyo8 - positive interrupter noise

http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/biting-mouthing-nipping-168082/

http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/impulse-control-calmness-168218/

Don't panic! You don't have to do all at once and on the first day! ;)

These links helped me greatly when dealing with puppy antics and the teenage stage!
 

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I really like the advice dog trainer Kevin Behan has for teaching a dog not to bite.

In the dog’s mind, the use of its mouth is synonymous with wanting something. Even when they don’t actually grab something in their jaws, they nonetheless feel the energetic essence of whatever they’re attracted to just as if it’s in their jaws. (As in: “I want it so bad I can taste it.”) Therefore, whenever a puppy gets excited for whatever reason, like kids coming home from school or the owner coming through the door, it’s instinctual computer commands “BITE something”. This is how every behavioral system and neurological circuit is constructed in their body and brain. Whatever else may happen to the dog after the fact (such as an owner’s correction) doesn’t register on the deepest plane of canine consciousness. What matters most to a puppy is that it “heard” an internally generated command to bite whatever it was that got it all excited. This command is millions of years old and there is no human reason that can neutralize it, such as “I am your pack leader”—“You are a bad dog” and so on. However, what allows a dog to resist an instinctual impulse to bite, and fortunately is an even stronger energy that arises from an even deeper aspect of its nature, is a feeling. So if a dog is raised and trained in regards to what and how it feels, then it will be able to go by feel in a critical moment rather than by instinct. The number one mistake puppy owners are making is overly stimulating their puppy, usually by showering it with attention as a measure of their love, and then when they don’t like the instincts this triggers, they then set out to teach it how to be social by correcting these instincts. This short circuit then becomes the basis of how the personality of the puppy then develops. Nine out of ten times it won’t become an aggressive behavior, but you can clearly see it via “that look in its eye”.
https://naturaldogtraining.com/blog/teaching-a-puppy-not-to-bite/
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sounds like over excitement to me. One of my Rottweilers used to do this to my husband when he came home from work. We redirected to a toy and praised him to the moon and back and gave him pets when he had the toy in his mouth when he was so excited. :)

Do you do any clicker training?
He doesn't appreciate his toy when he sees me arrive home. He bites on my hand too, playfully. Yelping doesn't work to easy up his biting, neither does timeouts, firmness, or anything of the latter.

Like I said, it happens all the time even when he's not excited.

It only happens to me, though.
 

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Do you say hi to him when you come home? I wait until everyone is calm and has gone to the bathroom before engaging in hellos, except with Karitsa that has her own unique routine here as she won't go outside until I say hi to her. Maybe put your hands in your pocket and ignore by turning away until he calms down.
 

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All the things you say you have tried: yelping (he's too old for that), timeouts, firmness, etc all seem like cues that give the dog attention for biting. Have you tried standing extremely still, moving your hands away from where the dog can reach and waiting? Praise and attention the second the dog sits or is calm.

I second the videos posted above. I"ve been using them with my puppy.

In addition, you should be practicing this routine a lot. More than when you just come home. So on the weekends or weeknights, practice leaving, and coming back and keeping the dog calm. Amp up the excitement factor once the dog has mastered being calm when you walk in the door.
Essentially you need to break the behaviour you would like to see down into simple steps:
1. Be calm, learn to sit or down.
2. Be calm at a door- sit or down until released
3. Be calm at a door when you leave and quickly return
4. Be calm at a door when you have been away longer
5. Be calm at a door when things are crazy exciting (think family you haven't seen in a while arriving for Christmas and saying loud/excited hellos).
 

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He doesn't appreciate his toy when he sees me arrive home. He bites on my hand too, playfully. Yelping doesn't work to easy up his biting, neither does timeouts, firmness, or anything of the latter.

Like I said, it happens all the time even when he's not excited.

It only happens to me, though.

Short answer, ignore him. If he acts like that when you get home he ceases to exist, don't look at him, don't talk to him, pay him 0 attention until all 4 paws are on the ground and he's calmed down some once that happens then very CALMLY give him some attention but do NOT get him riled up.

If he's really bad and ignoring him is not working then try going back outside and waiting a bit for him to calm down before going back in, if he acts up go back out, if he's calm then calmly give him some attention.

Either way you do it it will take a while for him to really understand what it is you want, so don't get discouraged or give up. Expect it to probably take a week or so but he will learn. NEVER give in and pay attention to him when he acts up, when you do that you teach him that if he acts like that long enough you will reward him with attention.
 

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He doesn't appreciate his toy when he sees me arrive home. He bites on my hand too, playfully. Yelping doesn't work to easy up his biting, neither does timeouts, firmness, or anything of the latter.

Like I said, it happens all the time even when he's not excited.

It only happens to me, though.
It could be that even though he is not as excited, he is still excited and/or frustrated and this is just his way of getting the energy out there.

I would dare to suggest that you think of it as a bit of a compliment from him, that he chose you. ;)

I completely agree with @Rain .

Have you tried any of the methods in the videos?

What does a day in his life look like? What does he do?

And what is this little nut's name? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This problem is carried to my other post ( I only have two).

Basically I think he is biting out of agression, he stats barking randomly and his ears perk up and tries to jump.
 
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