Dog Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What do you feed your Labs?

-dry kibble?
-wet canned?
-treats?
-food supplements as eggs and fish oils?


As lifetime owner of four "pet-quality" Labrador retrievers from BYBs, last owned in 2004, they would get Pedigree dry with a mix of Pedigree canned. They were also supplemented with fish oil and raw egg on occasion for a shiny coat. I liked to give them bacon flavor treats because dogs love bacon.

I'm thinking about taking up hunting and getting a pair of Lab pups in the future. One Lab I want to be field-bred. I think I would go for Pedigree HIGH Protein because some of these "high-horsepower" foods from Purina and seem to be more than double in price. Canned Pedigree is still reasonable in price if you buy from a big-box store. Some of these dry dog foods are over $100 for a 40-50 pound bag and I can't remember ever paying more than $25/bag for a 40-50 pound bag of Pedigree or Kirkland dry from Costco.

I liked to add some warm water to the dry to make it more appealing the the dogs.


Question: is your veterinarian the best source of nutritional advice for your dog?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
I'm not sure why you want replies only from owners of labs - there are plenty of non lab owning people people who could offer advice. I have a diploma in canine nutrition and would have been happy to chip in but I'm British and haven't had a labrador. Oh well ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not sure why you want replies only from owners of labs - there are plenty of non lab owning people people who could offer advice. I have a diploma in canine nutrition and would have been happy to chip in but I'm British and haven't had a labrador. Oh well ...
I figure the more specialized one gets, the better one could offer advice. After all you would not want a dentist to practice brain surgery on you, would you?
I figure different breeds may require different proper dietary regimens. An active gun dog is going to be fed differently than a lazy Basset hound.

Here in America, Labs, by far, are also the most common breed and heavily used here for hunting ducks and upland fowl.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
No problem, best of luck in your search. By the way, you should read up about littermate syndrome if you are going to get two, even if not from the same litter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I figure different breeds may require different proper dietary regimens. An active gun dog is going to be fed differently than a lazy Basset hound.
Firstly bassets are not lazy by nature as they are bred for hunting hare. Secondly anyone with any idea of nutrition would not be feeding a commercial food full of grain and fillers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I would get two unrelated puppies. The BYB who sold me my former male in 1997 recommended "rice and lamb" food for "Labrador retrievers". I figure "HIGH protein" dog food varieties are best for any active, working dogs. Pedigree makes a HIGH-Protein Beef and Lamb variety. One thing I would like to learn how to avoid is bloat in canines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Firstly bassets are not lazy by nature as they are bred for hunting hare. Secondly anyone with any idea of nutrition would not be feeding a commercial food full of grain and fillers.
In America, the Basset is often used by truck drivers for cab security and they are cooped up most of the time. They, like the unattractive bulldog, are perceived here as a lethargic breed. I once fostered a male tri-color Basset and he liked to eat and sleep much of time and sexually harass my male Lab. The beagle is common for hunting rabbit in America.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
Even if the puppies are unrelated, you should still be aware of the potential issues with littermate syndrome, it applies to any two pups close in age.

I do recommend you read up on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
In America, the Basset is often used by truck drivers for cab security and they are cooped up most of the time. They, like the unattractive bulldog, are perceived here as a lethargic breed. I once fostered a male tri-color Basset and he liked to eat and sleep much of time and sexually harass my male Lab. The beagle is common for hunting rabbit in America.
My bold highlights the problem. The laziness is not that of the dog but that of the owners so not Lazy basset but Lazy basset owners.
As for pedigree. I was trying to be tactful, @JoanneF tried to offer a hint ... but read for yourself , this isnt the type you specify but honestly there isnt a dog food site that reccomends this brand except pedigree themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
My bold highlights the problem. The laziness is not that of the dog but that of the owners so not Lazy basset but Lazy basset owners.
As for pedigree. I was trying to be tactful, @JoanneF tried to offer a hint ... but read for yourself , this isnt the type you specify but honestly there isnt a dog food site that reccomends this brand except pedigree themselves.
The trouble is often people are on a budget and this includes dog foods. Those other brands that get those high star ratings are likely to cost twice as much or more than Pedigree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
many good quality brands do cost more per kilo but the fact is with a good quality food you actually feed less than you do with a cheap food full of fillers.
I feed raw but in the past I have fed dry food and so I know you look at something cheap like pedigree you may have to give twice the amount that you do with a good quality food which means that the good quality food doesn't cost as much as you actually think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
In America we use pounds.

I will have to do a cost comparison: feeding the cheap brands vs feeding the pricey brands according to the feeding instructions of each product.

Pedigree High Protein Beef & Lamb Flavor Adult Dry Dog Food

46.80 pound bag

Chewy retail: $26.32

Feed 50-75 pound dog 3 to 4 cups daily

Cups per pound: 4

Cost per pound of food: $0.56

Cost per daily feeding: $0.42 to $0.56



Purina Pro Plan Sport All Life Stages Performance 30/20 Formula Dry Dog Food

50 pound bag

Chewy retail: $61.98

Feed 51-75 pound dog: 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 cups daily

Cups per pound: 4

Cost per pound of food: $1.24

Cost per daily feeding: $0.77 to $1.08 (almost double)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Hi I have two hunting chocolate labs. I personally feed a variety of kibbles (all without corn, wheat, soy, and by-products). Right now my dogs are on Zignature but I have a bag of Essence waiting after (I never stick to the same brand for kibble). I pick kibbles that are high in protein and low in carb. I’ve feed Signature, Essence, Stella and Chewys, Acana, Farmina, and Orijen. These are the main ones that I bounce around.

I also give them cans as well to top the kibble; Koha, Essence, Zignature, Farmina, Dave’s, Weruva, and Artemis.

For treats I only do freeze dried and limited ingredient.

At dinner time my dogs get raw. I bounce around brands here too. I’ve tried Vital Essentials (my favorite so far), Steve’s, North West Naturals, Stella and Chewys, Tucker’s, Primal, and given them parts of animals I’ve hunted.

I do a rotational feeding for my dogs. I mix it up for them all the time with texture and proteins. I’ve had labs my whole life and before I only fed kibble. The two dogs that I have now are the best looking labs I’ve ever had. Their skin and coat is so soft, they shed less, their teeth are white, they have higher energy levels, and their bodies are tone and muscular.

I would never feed my dogs anything from Purina, Science Diet, Iams, or Royal Canine. I’ve seen these foods destroy people’s dogs and prevent them from thriving.

Hopefully this helps!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top