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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Breed: American Pit Bull Terrier
Common name: Pit, Pit Bull, Pit bulldog, bulldog.
The ancestors of the APBT were the pit dogs of Europe used in the blood sport of dog fighting. These dogs also baited bulls and were seen in rat pit contest as well. The breed began to develop in America from dogs largely imported from England and Ireland. In the 1800 and 1900s many dogs were brought to American by immigrants or those who desired pit dogs. There were several breeders in the US who began their own bloodlines and helped establish the APBT in the USA. There were also breeders in other like Canada.

One of the oldest lines is the Colby bloodline, which dates back to the 1800s. Some of the original foundation dogs for the APBT came from Colby dogs.
Such as Colby’s Galtie born in 1910 of Irish import parents, Colby’s Tige born 1896 a beautiful brindle male, conditioned at 35lbs, Colby’s Pincher born new years eve of 1896 a large dog conditioned at 56lbs and Colby’s Bob Tail Bob born 1895 conditioned at 48lbs, to name a few. The line continues to be bred today by the Colby family and other individuals. Colby bred dogs can be observed in the show ring and on the weight pull track.


Some other documented early ancestors are
Henry’s Richmond (imported) a solid white dog owned by F.G. Henry.
Charlie Lloyd’s Pilot (imported) Born in 1878
Weight: 36lbs Conditioned weight 27lbs
The Gas House Dog known as McDonald’s Grip
Born around 1870, a brindle and white, conditioned at 31lbs
Galvin’s Pup born in the 1880s, a nice little brindle


There were many men besides the Colbys who were heavily involved with breeding APBTs in the early days, some of them are Con Feeley, William Lightner, Frank Henry, W.T. Delihant, Earl Tudor, Jim Williams and Vickery, who’s dogs can be seen behind today’s APBTs. The OFRN (Old Family Red Nose) dogs include various strains of red nose dogs from the likes of Wallace, Williams, Hemphill, Creed, Neblett and Norrod to name a few. Some of the dogs behind todays modern stock include Harvey’s Red Devil, Champion Tudor’s Fighting Peter, Ferguson’s Centipede, Wise's Maximillian, Hemphill's Geronimo and Wallace dogs.


Champion Centipede a great grandson of Fighting Peter and great great grandson of Colby’s Galtie, bred with Lightner blood.


Wallace’s Red Brave


Sarona Trouble

Some old black and tans


Colby’s Mack (a grandson and great grandson of Colby’s Pincher)


Shipley’s Boxer (Noonan bred)

In time breeders wanted to keep pedigree records with an official registering body, some even enjoyed participating in conformation shows. The AKC (American Kennel Club) has been used to register pure bred dogs since being founded in 1884, some pit dog owners began registering their dogs with the AKC. These dogs were registered and shown as Bull Terriers, the Pit Bull was often referred to as the sporting bull terrier and as the American Bull Terrier, the Bull Terrier itself was sometimes differentiated as bench bull terrier or English Bull Terrier. The UKC (United Kennel Club) was initially started in 1898 to register Pit Bulls as the AKC did not want to give them recognition as their own breed. The PBTBA (Pit Bull Terrier Breeders’ Association) was also used to register and keep track of APBT pedigrees and litters. There actually came to be two PBTBA, which would both claim to be the true PBTBA and disputes with each other. One of which G.H. Vickery was President, he also supported AKC recognition and bred not only Pit Bulls but also (English) Bull Terriers. The other was run by Guy McCord, who did not care for AKC recognition and eventually his registry became known as the ADBA (American Dog Breeders Association) and was incorporated in 1909 and breeds besides the APBT were allowed registration. It was not until 1935 that AKC recognition was finally granted for Pit Bulls, the name chosen for the breed was Staffordshire Terrier, rather than anything with the word “pit” in it. Several pit dog owners registered their dogs with AKC, but numbers were very low, registration was allowed to be open for an extended period of time and opened again, but the AKC dogs come from a very small gene pool. A standard was drafted, and finally conformation shows could be held with a class for them. The breed name was changed in the 70s to American Staffordshire Terrier, due to the Staffordshire Bull Terrier being recognized by the AKC (a cousin breed from England). Today there are other registering bodies which accept the APBT or were founded to register the APBT and other working breeds.

Modern APBT


Grand Champion XVIII Matthew P.O.E. (highest pointed ADBA conformation dog and sire of highest pointed bitch)


Ace of Ace III Red Incinerator P.O.E. (winner of over 30 most weight pulled per pound awards)

The APBT is a medium sized breed, typically 30-50lbs, short coat, lean and muscular. There are several standards (from different registries), but most are similar. Which call for a balanced dog, fairly square and not overly bulky. These breed standards can be found and researched online. To be brief the head should be 2/3 the width of the shoulders, teeth should meet in a scissor bite, ribcage should be deep and well sprung at time and tapering at the bottom, scapula should be well laid back and shoulders should be wider than the rib cage at the 8th rib, the backend is considered very important good angulation, broad loin that is long enough to square the build and muscle attachment should be long and deep. The standard for Old Family Red Nose dogs within the (OFRNR) is similar, but with added requirements for registration and to meet conformation standard dogs must be at least 25% OFRN, be red, silver red or brindle with red nose, red toe nails and amber eyes, must not have more than 25% white markings and must not have a white head.

APBT Colors include black or seal, various shades of fawn, red, brown or yellow, tan point or tri color, different shades of brindle and chocolate light to dark. Blue is a colored often seen in dogs of APBT/AST as it became very popular in AmStaff lines, while being almost nonexistent in the APBT of the present day. Some of the old blue pit dogs include Rubel’s Joker and Blue Mike.
Pit Bulls require little grooming, bathing when needing, keeping nails trimmed and brushing to remove hairs during shedding is recommended.

Pit Bulls are very people oriented dogs who bond closely with their family. These dogs are known to be affectionate and make great companions. The APBT is also known to have a love for children, despite publicized incidents of attacks on children, which only represent an extremely small number of Pit Bulls. The breed being biddable are often easy to train, especially with the right motivation – which can be food, toys or praise. Once they figure out what you want them to do it is simple, using positive training with rewards works very well. Pit Bulls can also be a handler sensitive breed.

APBTs are known to have a high prey drive, though it is possible for some to cohabitate with other household pets. This breed has been used for hunting, including as catch dogs for feral hogs. Dog aggression is also a known trait within the APBT. Some Pits are dog social or will get along with housemates, but some Pit Bulls have a high fight drive. In some multi dog households they must be kept separated from other dogs/each other. As with all breeds proper socialization is in the best interest of a Pit Bull puppy. The APBT is naturally happy, enthusiastic and confident dogs, having a genetically stable dog is very important. Irresponsible owners and poor breeding have caused unstable dogs to make headlines.

While, Pit Bulls can make great pets for the right owner, they are also a drivey, working breed. Which means they are well suited for dog sports and working task. This is a versatile, biddable dog. Modern day Pit Bulls have excelled in weight pull, dock diving, agility, obedience trials, nose work, iron dog, hunting, law enforcement, service dogs, therapy dogs and many other facets.
In general Pit Bulls are a healthy breed, but like any other breed they do have known health problems. Some health problems are more severe, and others can be minor, some are also uncommon but have been observed in the breed. Health problems include hip dysplasia, sub aortic stenosis, cone rod dystrophy 2, hyperuricosuria, allergies and cancer. Sporadic cases of Von Willebrands Disease have been observed rare cases of systemic lupus and liver shunts. Some instances of hyperthyroidism and Addision’s disease have also been noted. Due to interbreeding between APBT and the AKC AmStaff lines it is also wise to be aware of the possibility of Cone Rod Dystrophy 1 and Cerebellar Ataxia.
 

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I love it :) I learned a lot about Pitbulls in that. :) Red Nose pitbulls are gorgeous. That's what your puppy (Rev.. I don't know if he has a name yet) is right?? They have a very deep history. I guess for some reason it didn't occur to me that their job was to fight or bait. It's interesting that the AKC didn't want them so the UKC was made good information to keep locked in filing cabinets in peoples head :):) You did a fantastic job with this!!! I was getting anxious waiting for it :):)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I love it :) I learned a lot about Pitbulls in that. :) Red Nose pitbulls are gorgeous. That's what your puppy (Rev.. I don't know if he has a name yet) is right?? They have a very deep history. I guess for some reason it didn't occur to me that their job was to fight or bait. It's interesting that the AKC didn't want them so the UKC was made good information to keep locked in filing cabinets in peoples head :):) You did a fantastic job with this!!! I was getting anxious waiting for it :):)
He has a name now, Kratos. I have several red nose dogs, including him. His sire is over 80% OFRN, but ironically he is black nose with black mask and doesn't look very OFRN like (I've had black nose dogs myself which still have physical build / head of old family red nose dog). Clearly, his sire produces the type though. His dam is red brindle red nose and she's around 48% OFRN. They both have different strains of it. My dog Kratos in complete pedigree is 34 times Wilder's Red Satan, 421 times Hemphill & Wilder's Geronimo II, 7 times Wilder's Red Apache, 913 times Hemphill's Red Dixie, 783 times Hemphill's Geronimo, 1538 times Hemphill's Rebel, 6 times Norrod's Hemphill Maude, 2383 times Wallace's Red Squaw, 838 times Ross' Red Devil, 16,625 times Ferguson's Centipede.

I forgot to mention Clouse and Clouse bred dogs, this is another old line and as well he had some OFRN and some of his non OFRN were crossed with OFRN blood.

They were called "pit dogs" as often dog fights were held in pits, there is documentation of their being dog pits in England in the 1700s.
As well as bull baiting took place, it was both entertainment and some say thought to tenderize and enhance the taste of the meat.
Terriers would clear places of rats, but rat pits were also created for competition to see how many rats a dog could kill in a given time.

Pit fighting is also how they got the name Pit Bull. UKC name was given as American (pit) Bull Terrier and Pit Bull Terrier was used by others. American Bull Terrier was suggested for AKC, but some of the Bull Terrier folk were against this. Prior to having the official names they were referred to as pit dogs, bulldogs, sporting bull terriers, game bull terriers. If you read old stories of fighting bulldogs it us the Pit Bull, which is far from the modern (English) Bulldog that people most often associate with the word.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I still forgot stuff in my post gggrrrr. I had most of this written on my computer and finished it up last night, but I also hard some segments on word program on my phone that I totally forgot. I was going to type that on my computer or email to myself and copy/paste it in. Ugh.
 

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It's okay I forgot things on mine too and kind of added it in LOL :) I think that's a normal thing to do and I love his name Kratos that's great name. It's completely out of the box good name :):)
 

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For some reason I guess I thought they had a different job since dog fighting not okay. I watched pitbulls and parolees they all seemed so lovable even though they came from bad circumstances :):) I also read through history and found this is just something people do put a bad name on dogs. I believe Rottweilers at one time had a bad name then it just kept moving from one dog to the next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
It's okay I forgot things on mine too and kind of added it in LOL :) I think that's a normal thing to do and I love his name Kratos that's great name. It's completely out of the box good name :):)
Thanks I like to pick names that you don't hear all the time.

Think I forgot to say Red Incinerator is an OFRN dog also.

For some reason I guess I thought they had a different job since dog fighting not okay. I watched pitbulls and parolees they all seemed so lovable even though they came from bad circumstances :):) I also read through history and found this is just something people do put a bad name on dogs. I believe Rottweilers at one time had a bad name then it just kept moving from one dog to the next.
It all started when fighting and baiting was legal and many breeders continued after laws prohibited it. They were used for other things too before like police work, guard dogs (but rather than attack they were usually trained to tackle and hold) and hunting and family companions, it is just that the prominent ancestors were fighting dogs and at times ones that had other jobs were also bred for fighting or pit dogs themselves. Today they are used to hunt and as catch dogs pretty often, some have other jobs or do dog sports as I mentioned.

Oh yeah they really live people and are very resilient.
 

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Guard dogs I beat they make great guard dogs and holding they have a really strong bite from what I've seen on TV. I didn't know they where Police dogs either :) Learn something new everyday :):) Well lots of things new everyday :):)
 

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Irresponsible owners and poor breeding have caused unstable dogs to make headlines.

.
Upfront, I know very little about the breed and their history BUT now I know much more due to your posts, thanks.

Secondly, from a purely uneducated superficial personal viewpoint, Wallace's Red Brave looks like one awesome specimen to me.

Thirdly, does the picture of Ace of Ace III Red Incinerator display the proper stack for the breed or is it typically more squared at a conformation competition. If so, why?

Now to the words I quoted in your post: Are you talking lack of solid "nerves" as is the plight of too many GSDs these days?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Irresponsible owners and poor breeding have caused unstable dogs to make headlines.

.
Upfront, I know very little about the breed and their history BUT now I know much more due to your posts, thanks.

Secondly, from a purely uneducated superficial personal viewpoint, Wallace's Red Brave looks like one awesome specimen to me.

Thirdly, does the picture of Ace of Ace III Red Incinerator display the proper stack for the breed or is it typically more squared at a conformation competition. If so, why?

Now to the words I quoted in your post: Are you talking lack of solid "nerves" as is the plight of too many GSDs these days?

Thanks
Red Brave's call name was Curly, his pit weight was 47-48lbs. It was said by Bob Wallace that Red Brave was the greatest pit dog he ever had, but after almost dying from his "game test" Bob Wallace (who was very attached to Curly himself) promised his wife he wouldn't fight him again, therefore he was never matched. He was the Wallace's house pet, apparently easy to train, smart and biddable and going everywhere with Bob.

Cin is not stacked in the photo and is a weight pull dog. Yes a proper stack the dog should be more square, not sloped or legs extended. You want the dog to be standing correctly (naturally) to judge proper rear angulation and other aspects of the dogs structure.

There are probably several reasons. Lack of good nerves makes for dogs that you can't trust. Irresponsible breeders and owners ruin breeds, especially ones as popular as the Pit Bull or GSD.

You have owners who don't know how to handle the problem dogs they have, those who ignore the issues or those who even encourage it.
If the dog is a resource guarder and attacks a child it can be serious. If the dog is nervous and pushed past threshold same outcome.

Breeders continue the problem from one generation to the next, so problems continue to exist. Breeding fearful dogs leads to bite incidents. Breeding man aggressive dogs and mishandling them results in attacks or deaths. Breeding dogs which lack bite inhibition that's key to the breed leads to bites and attacks, including those on children. Then there are those with redirected aggression.
Letting Pit Bulls run loose causes issues, even if the attack is on another dog or pet, it's still a problem. Taking Pits to dog parks can be very problematic as well, should a fight occur with the Pit Bull.
Some mix large guardian types wth Pit Bulls, combining size and defensive nature with the tenacity of Pit, which in the wrong hands can be lethal. The dog can't be physically controlled by most people, left untrained and unsocialized is a recipe for disaster. If an attack happens it will always be labeled purely a "Pit Bull attacm".
All these things lead to people distrusting the breed as a whole, is the focus of news stories, reasons people advocate for breed specific legislation, owners can have trouble finding a place to rent. So there are a number of causes as to why Pit Bulls and their owners have a bad name.
 

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Hopefully one day people will start blaming the owners not the breed. It's not their fault it's the owners. I guess people just see the surface and go from there not really understanding what did it. Curly is a cute name for Pitbull :):):) It's good that man listened to his wife. The Pitbull sounded like a very good house pet :):):)
 

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These posts were very informative and I enjoyed them. Where I live it seems like everyone has a pit bull " type " dog running loose..... But they dont look nearly as good as the ones you've posted! The muscle definition is awesome.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hopefully one day people will start blaming the owners not the breed. It's not their fault it's the owners. I guess people just see the surface and go from there not really understanding what did it. Curly is a cute name for Pitbull :):):) It's good that man listened to his wife. The Pitbull sounded like a very good house pet :):):)
Pretty much and it is with any breed too. Rather than looking at causes of temperament and specific bites and preventing them, people blame the breed or an individual dog is simply "mean". Or a dog that gave clear warning signals "snapped without warning".

Yes guess he was a very good house dog, but also a very good pit dog, he only feared losing him so hee lived the good life from them on. I will try to look on my books and find the stories about him and post here if you like.

These posts were very informative and I enjoyed them. Where I live it seems like everyone has a pit bull " type " dog running loose..... But they dont look nearly as good as the ones you've posted! The muscle definition is awesome.....
Breeding certainly makes a difference. Diet and exercise can help. Thanks for reading.
Sending...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Guard dogs I beat they make great guard dogs and holding they have a really strong bite from what I've seen on TV. I didn't know they where Police dogs either :) Learn something new everyday :):) Well lots of things new everyday :):)
I haven't forgotten about the stories, just got to get in my books, maybe tonight.
Generally they are too people friendly to make good guard dogs. Many people say they would lick a trespasser to death as a joke. They have been known to react when their owner is in danger, but that's not a guarantee. If someone wants to take something from your home or yard the Pit Bull will probably be happy to greet them as a friend.
The bite isn't necessarily stronger than average, but they tend to keep their grip and not let go. Some would bite, but it was mostly holding someone by pinning them with their body. I've read about them tackling or tripping people. They can be trained to bite to, but in today's world you want professionally train any dog for this type of work and make sure they are rock solid, BUT especially a Pit Bull with all the negative media attention, you don't want to create a dangerous dog.
So while they did guard businesses, cars, carriages or homes it wasn't common for them to bite and either way they had to be trained and reinforced to exhibit the behavior. They do not have the territorial guardy behavior or defense drive like a natural guardian breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Am Pit Bull Terrier Info Part II

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The APBT is generally a naturally lean and muscular dog. Obesity is a problem for any breed of dog, so keeping an APBT fit and healthy is a must. Part of keeping an APBT healthy and in great shape is a good diet in an appropriate amount. One diet to keep an APBT in top notch shape is a raw diet. Prey model diet which is feeding a raw diet consisting of about 80% muscle meat, 10% bones and 10% organs. Whole prey can also be fed, examples would be giving a whole chicken or rabbit. The amount you need to feed will vary depending on your dog’s age, metabolism and activity level. Feeding around 3% of the dog’s body weight as a maintenance amount is generally recommended, example a 32lbs Pit Bull would be fed about 1lb or 16oz per day. Puppies need to eat more (up to 10% of their body weight), active dogs or those being conditioned will also require more. As with kibble you need to adjust to find the right amount. When feeding kibble, it best to look for a dry dog food that has quality ingredients, is mainly meat, high protein and high fat (such as 30/20) is a big plus.

Conditioning an APBT for conformation or weight pull can be done in various way. Finding what the dog likes best (treadmill, swimming, springpole, flirtpole, running with the owner, drag weight, jenny, ect) and what works best for the dog will help greatly to yield desired results and a happy dog. There are many keeps out there to try out, modify or use as a guideline. It is best to keep a Pit Bull fairly fit, rather than starting with an obese out of shape dog (which is not healthy anyway). Methods can also vary depending on event. Example if conditioning for conformation only, then doing a lot of running next to a bike, running after flirtpole, ect can suffice to create a lean, muscled look, but if I am conditioning for weight pull I will incorporate dragging weights increasing the amount in increments. Diet while conditioning is vital, the dog will need more calories. This will require feeding more, adding additional fats, with time an owner can find what works to the dog’s maximum benefit.

APBTs are one of the most popular breeds of dogs (in the USA) and therefore are over bred and have suffered from poor breeding practices. If one wishes to obtain a puppy from a breeder it is highly recommended to seek out a responsible breeder. Finding a knowledgeable breeder is important to avoid health and temperament problems. These breeders will also be there to answer any questions and will always take a dog produced by them back, if the new owner can’t keep the dog. The first steps, before you even start seeking a breeder, would be to learn as much as you can about the APBT, learn about different bloodlines and study pedigrees. One step to finding a good breeder is to attend shows and dog sports even in your area. This will help you meet breeders and APBT owners who can recommend breeders to you. In this modern age the internet can be a bad source of information, but it also can be a positive resource. Not only do some reputable breeders have websites, blogs or facebook pages, but you can also find out about different breeders (what they are producing, if they are reputable or not) or learn more about lines you are interested (good, bad, traits, ect) by being able to network with APBT owners across the country. If interested in specific breedings, try to find out as much as you can about the dogs within the pedigree. A good breeder will be able to provide you with their dogs’ pedigrees too and also information on their dogs’ health testing and titles.

APBTs can be strong chewers, especially as puppies. Providing appropriate chew items will be of great benefit and can help deter any dog from chewing on the owner’s things. Pig ears, cow hooves, bully sticks and safe bones are wonderful for keeping your APBT happy. The APBT also loves to tug, making a springpole can give your dog great fun. Using a garage spring there are different methods to make one, from simply hanging the spring with a toy or hide from a tree to making a stand alone post to hand the spring/toy or hide from. A flirtpole only requires a pole (I recommend PVC pipe), some rope and a toy or hide attached. This will give the dog lots of fun to chase the lure and plenty of exercise.

It is important as a responsible APBT owner to not only train and socialize your dog, but to use proper containment. An APBT that is running loose can cause problems and could also be in danger. Keeping your APBT in your yard is a crucial part of ownership, unless you have secure outdoor containment your dog should not be left outside unsupervised. A secure privacy fence, that are dig proof, with measures to keep the dog from going over the top is one way. A secure tie out would consist of an appropriate size chain or strong cable and durable hardware, bullsnaps are one of the most reliable snaps to attach to a chain, using either a quicklink or lap link. Even if a Pit Bull is a house dog and not on the tie out much it is still important to periodically check hardware for wear and replace parts as needed. An outdoor kennel can also be used as secure confinement, wielded wire would be the best way to go, as chainlink kennels can generally be easily escaped. Make sure the kennel also has dig proofing and a top for shade which will also prevent jumping or climbing out.
 

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The APBT is generally a naturally lean and muscular dog. Obesity is a problem for any breed of dog, so keeping an APBT fit and healthy is a must. Part of keeping an APBT healthy and in great shape is a good diet in an appropriate amount. One diet to keep an APBT in top notch shape is a raw diet. Prey model diet which is feeding a raw diet consisting of about 80% muscle meat, 10% bones and 10% organs. Whole prey can also be fed, examples would be giving a whole chicken or rabbit. The amount you need to feed will vary depending on your dog’s age, metabolism and activity level. Feeding around 3% of the dog’s body weight as a maintenance amount is generally recommended, example a 32lbs Pit Bull would be fed about 1lb or 16oz per day. Puppies need to eat more (up to 10% of their body weight), active dogs or those being conditioned will also require more. As with kibble you need to adjust to find the right amount. When feeding kibble, it best to look for a dry dog food that has quality ingredients, is mainly meat, high protein and high fat (such as 30/20) is a big plus.

Conditioning an APBT for conformation or weight pull can be done in various way. Finding what the dog likes best (treadmill, swimming, springpole, flirtpole, running with the owner, drag weight, jenny, ect) and what works best for the dog will help greatly to yield desired results and a happy dog. There are many keeps out there to try out, modify or use as a guideline. It is best to keep a Pit Bull fairly fit, rather than starting with an obese out of shape dog (which is not healthy anyway). Methods can also vary depending on event. Example if conditioning for conformation only, then doing a lot of running next to a bike, running after flirtpole, ect can suffice to create a lean, muscled look, but if I am conditioning for weight pull I will incorporate dragging weights increasing the amount in increments. Diet while conditioning is vital, the dog will need more calories. This will require feeding more, adding additional fats, with time an owner can find what works to the dog’s maximum benefit.

APBTs are one of the most popular breeds of dogs (in the USA) and therefore are over bred and have suffered from poor breeding practices. If one wishes to obtain a puppy from a breeder it is highly recommended to seek out a responsible breeder. Finding a knowledgeable breeder is important to avoid health and temperament problems. These breeders will also be there to answer any questions and will always take a dog produced by them back, if the new owner can’t keep the dog. The first steps, before you even start seeking a breeder, would be to learn as much as you can about the APBT, learn about different bloodlines and study pedigrees. One step to finding a good breeder is to attend shows and dog sports even in your area. This will help you meet breeders and APBT owners who can recommend breeders to you. In this modern age the internet can be a bad source of information, but it also can be a positive resource. Not only do some reputable breeders have websites, blogs or facebook pages, but you can also find out about different breeders (what they are producing, if they are reputable or not) or learn more about lines you are interested (good, bad, traits, ect) by being able to network with APBT owners across the country. If interested in specific breedings, try to find out as much as you can about the dogs within the pedigree. A good breeder will be able to provide you with their dogs’ pedigrees too and also information on their dogs’ health testing and titles.

APBTs can be strong chewers, especially as puppies. Providing appropriate chew items will be of great benefit and can help deter any dog from chewing on the owner’s things. Pig ears, cow hooves, bully sticks and safe bones are wonderful for keeping your APBT happy. The APBT also loves to tug, making a springpole can give your dog great fun. Using a garage spring there are different methods to make one, from simply hanging the spring with a toy or hide from a tree to making a stand alone post to hand the spring/toy or hide from. A flirtpole only requires a pole (I recommend PVC pipe), some rope and a toy or hide attached. This will give the dog lots of fun to chase the lure and plenty of exercise.

It is important as a responsible APBT owner to not only train and socialize your dog, but to use proper containment. An APBT that is running loose can cause problems and could also be in danger. Keeping your APBT in your yard is a crucial part of ownership, unless you have secure outdoor containment your dog should not be left outside unsupervised. A secure privacy fence, that are dig proof, with measures to keep the dog from going over the top is one way. A secure tie out would consist of an appropriate size chain or strong cable and durable hardware, bullsnaps are one of the most reliable snaps to attach to a chain, using either a quicklink or lap link. Even if a Pit Bull is a house dog and not on the tie out much it is still important to periodically check hardware for wear and replace parts as needed. An outdoor kennel can also be used as secure confinement, wielded wire would be the best way to go, as chainlink kennels can generally be easily escaped. Make sure the kennel also has dig proofing and a top for shade which will also prevent jumping or climbing out.
I didn't think you forgot @SpicyBulldog I understand busy :):) I'm reading all of this and comparing pitbulls besides the obvious structure, name oh and fur. Really aren't that much different then huskies. They just want to be loved need proper care and they could be the the exact same dog. Have different jobs but they seem to have a lot in common. :):) I understand a lot about the digging out and chain link not being the best LOL :):) (before mine where trained a night mare)
I think this breed is really awesome!! They have a lot of history and require lots of work. It's takes a special person to own a Pitbull :):)

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There are a few pitbulls near me!! I know there are a lot around they are almost as common as a Husky or German Shepherd where I live :):)

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@Markie

You might be interested in these..... are roughly from around 1905-1915


Cheif Lucky Bill and his daughter with Jeff and Biddie. He not only bred game pit dogs but also police dogs. When the militia mobilized his dogs gave a great demonstration and Governor Deneen was said to have given his compliments on the dogs.








 

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That's awesome I'm completely surprised they didn't eat the chickens :):):) I really like the paper with Lucky Bill and his daughter those dogs look really good, very well behaved :):)

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