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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. :)
Wanting to get some outside opinions from people who'd know what they're looking at. I'm a little worried about my boy's legs, mainly because I've never dealt with a large-giant breed puppy before, so I'm not sure if his wrists are supposed to look like they do.

Breed: Akita
Age: 4 months old in a few days.
Diet: On a combination of kibble that is all within the guidelines of nutrition for a big puppy, consisting primarily of Solid Gold Wolfcub. (I'm looking for something better, but I can't find anything that's sold in any local pet stores or feed shops. I've heard Blue Buffalo and Eagle Pack, but they both have way too much calcium.)

He's eating a healthy amount, is a healthy weight, has a good coat, and the vet had no concerns about him when I had him in a couple weeks ago.

Pictures attached. Silly face in the second picture unrelated, haha. Caught him yawning, and it just happened to be the best lit picture showing his forelegs front-on like that.

What do you guys think? :/ If he is growing wrong... any suggestions on improvements?
 

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Did you ask the vet specifically about the legs? Sometimes they don't mention things like that because people get touchy when you talk about their dogs conformation.
 

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Almost looks like how a lot of dachshund front legs end up from the excess pressure on their joints...don't know about Akita's so can't really say, but that would concern me as well until I heard a professional opinion specific to that question.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, I didn't notice it myself until today, when I was going back through the pictures I took over the last couple of days.

Not normal healthy puppy legs, then? :/
 

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No, I didn't notice it myself until today, when I was going back through the pictures I took over the last couple of days.

Not normal healthy puppy legs, then? :/
Difficult to say... it COULD be a growth stage, however I was paid to raise an akita from the age of 4 months and I never noticed his legs looking like this. The first pic doesn't look so bad but the second- is that just an odd pic? Can you get a pic of him standing square head-on?
 

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i don't know... it doesn't look right to me... i would suggest x-rays, but someone else may have more experience with it than i do... did you point it out to your vet? i've found that lots of vets are so focused on whatever you bring the animal in for that they might overlook something else, and need to have it pointed out (not sure how obvious it is when he is moving around etc) love the expression in the second pic ;)

welcome to the forum :)



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Discussion Starter #8
Took some more pictures specifically of his legs. Give me a second to pull them off my camera and resize them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here are more pictures.

He's going back into the vet in a few weeks anyway, for his last barrage of shots (There was some L-named vaccination that wasn't included in the series before this one, that my vet suggested I give him. The park he goes to seems like a perfect breeding ground for it, from what I could learn off of google, so I figured it was wise to vaccinate.) so I'll be sure to bring his legs up to the vet then.

I've only had him for 4 weeks. Would the results of my care be showing in his bone growth so soon?
I know that his breeder had been slacking in the quality of his food. (One of the reasons for giving him up, they had intended to keep him, but things happen, and they found themselves unable to fully meet his needs.)

If it IS uneven bone growth, will a proper diet from here out correct it? (Assuming there are no underlying issues, obviously)
 

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At first I was going to say that it could possibly be normal development. I've seen quite a few puppy pics where they appear to be knuckling over just above the pasterns, but they were or devolped to be normal limbed dogs. The reason for the appearance was either coat growth or an akward growth development. Your pup is also apears roached backed and very straight in the rear, but that could be due to the stance in the picture and/or his current growth stage.

From the pics you just posted. Its obvious from looking at the first pic, looking straight on at his front, that this is not normal groth development. When looking straight on the fornt or rear his legs should apear to be straight. But his legs appear to bend in slightly and then at the pastern they bend out dramatically. You should definitely consult your vet and possibly do x-rays. I'm not familiar with Akita specific bone/growth problems; you may want to speak with Akita breeders and even send them your pics and get their input on what may be going on, they might have more insight or advice that can help you and your vet diagnose and treat the issue if nescessary.
 

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Diet: On a combination of kibble that is all within the guidelines of nutrition for a big puppy, consisting primarily of Solid Gold Wolfcub. (I'm looking for something better, but I can't find anything that's sold in any local pet stores or feed shops. I've heard Blue Buffalo and Eagle Pack, but they both have way too much calcium.)
what???? eagle pack is THE BEST food for a growing large/giant breed IMHO. eagle packs large and giant breed puppy is THE ONLY puppy food i would EVER use. they have done extensive research on their food in conjunction with growth diseases. they have been proven to be the safest.

also when you are looking at a food its not the calcium that you need to look at. you need to be looking at calories, calcium/phosphorus ratio, etc. these are ALL factors. too many people focus on just calcium and thats incorrect. the food needs to be looked at as a whole, for example: calories need to be watched because increase calories = increase energy/growth.

i had a dog with HOD, i know a lot about nutrition and growth problems as i researched it extensively to try to save her life. if it were me, i would get that dog x-rayed. those joints are far too large and there is a curve at the pastern. look for any soreness, feel if the joints are hot, watch for fevers, etc. but most of all get some good x-rays first, and i would switch to eagle pack foods. solid golds calories are too high at 375 cal per cup, their protein is too high at 26% ( wouldnt go over 24%, and yes, that 2% is a big difference), and the phosphorus calcium level is incorrect, its 1.5/1.2 when if the calcium is 1.5 the phosphorus should be at 1.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: GreatDaneMom
Ease up, please. I've done everything within my knowledge for this puppy, and am currently hating myself feeling like I hurt him. It's not like I haven't been pouring money and effort into TRYING to feed him the right way. It's not like he's been spared any effort or expense toward vetting.
I've had him less than a month.

Did that month of feeding him expensive high-quality food that was within guidelines A, B, and C, but not D put his life in danger?

He's not sore at all. He's not limping. He doesn't have a fever. His joints aren't any warmer than the rest of him.


I came here for some advice and comfort, now I'm convinced that I gave him some bone disease with no cure, and I'm starting to wish I never even got him so that he wouldn't be stuck with someone as ignorant and apparently careless as me.
 

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Re: GreatDaneMom
Ease up, please. I've done everything within my knowledge for this puppy, and am currently hating myself feeling like I hurt him. It's not like I haven't been pouring money and effort into TRYING to feed him the right way. It's not like he's been spared any effort or expense toward vetting.
I've had him less than a month.

Did that month of feeding him expensive high-quality food that was within guidelines A, B, and C, but not D put his life in danger?

He's not sore at all. He's not limping. He doesn't have a fever. His joints aren't any warmer than the rest of him.


I came here for some advice and comfort, now I'm convinced that I gave him some bone disease with no cure, and I'm starting to wish I never even got him so that he wouldn't be stuck with someone as ignorant and apparently careless as me.
i dont feel i was being hard on you at all. in fact i think you are being too hard on yourself! im offering advice, not only advice, but FIRST HAND experience.

a month of unbalanced nutrition can cause a problem that fast. growth disease tend to strike up til 6months of age, at which that point they usually phase out because the dog isnt growing as fast. im not saying your dog does indeed have an issue, but i think its best you have x-rays done and change the nutrition to what should be for a growing dog of large size.

i wouldnt be hard on you about this, i just want you to have the CORRECT information to help sort this all out. i had a dog suffer from HOD, of which in the first 3 months of it she couldnt even sit up. here i was trying to find out everything i could to fix it because no one else could help me. i wish i had the valuable information in the beginning instead of having to research it all myself. the vets were no help when i came to the nutrition she needed to stop it all, all they could offer me was pain maintenance, etc. but it had to come down to nutritional support to control the disease.

growth diseases are not life lasting. the effects can be, but the disease isnt. my danes front legs are permanently disfigured because of it, other than that though, she has no limitations or pain. although i am still scared that the medications that she had to be on for so long will shorten her lifespan, which is short already.

youre not ignorant and careless, trust me. youre coming on here looking for help of which proves you care and you want to learn. im just trying to give you the information you need and give you the CORRECT information you need to have healthy, steady, slow growth in your dog.
 

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Re: GreatDaneMom
I was overly emotional when I replied to you earlier, I'm sorry for that. The thought that I did something to hurt this baby is killing me, especially when I read around about bone diseases and found that distemper can contribute, then I was stressing over whether or not be could have distemper.. (He's allergic to my cat, so he has a runny nose, sneezes, and recently had a very minor eye infection.. All leading me to worry, when coupled with this. I'm a very easily worried person. :/)

I do appreciate the advice, and will be getting him some eagle pack when I get paid wednesday. It's hugely relieving to finally have someone say "____ Is the right food. Feed that and he'll grow well."

He should be eating the large breed puppy formula, correct, not the adult one? When do I switch him to adult food?
Is it ok to add canned food, fruits and veggies to his kibble, or should it ONLY be dry kibble?
 

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There's no actual reason to think he has distemper, so my vet didn't do a blood test to rule it out, no.
(Once he's out of the apt and away from the cat, his nose is dry and he's a normal healthy puppy. The only symptoms he gets inside are slightly itchy eyes, clear watery nasal discharge, and sneezing if the cat's right in his face.)

I have GAD and I'm a hypochondriac. I worry endlessly and needlessly about any and every thing. If he were salivating I'd think he was rabid. If he was overweight I'd be sure he had parvo.

He's not on meds for allergies, other than benadryl. Why on earth would he be?
 
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