Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my best friend finally got a new dog, a border terrier. He is 7 and was used as stud at a breeder. He was being retired and my friend got him. He is fixed and has all his vaccinations. My dog is a mini schnauzer and is 12. We went to their house yesterday (I know we did so much that was wrong). Her dog has only been in the house for two weeks and is loving his new life. My dog is a gentle soul and never caused any problems so I let him in the front door of their house. Her dog came up an smelled him nose to nose. My dog took one more step and her Border Terrier clamped down on the back of his neck and got on top of him. We could not get his jaw loosened. He had pierced the skin. Three of us were trying to get him off. I finally got his jaw loose enough to pull him off and then he clamped down on my wrist and would not let go.

Is this normal. I have never seen a dog attack like this. They are mortified and don't know what to do. Now they are scared for other dogs. Is there any advice anyone can give me. After a while we took both dogs for a long walk side by side but he is nervous around my dog. I am not afraid of this dog, in fact I was petting him before we left and he is really great with humans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
So the first obvious thing you did that set the dog off was letting your pup into HIS house, a dogs house is his territory and they don't like strangers just coming in. Next time you need to slowly introduce them on neutral ground where neither dog has claimed the land as their own and keep them leashed so you can pull away quickly. He bit you because your hand was nearby and he was probably still trying to bite the other dog. I'd recommend they get a dog trainer :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Fear aggression is the most common aggression btw, you said he was nervous around your dg, he might not have liked your coming up to sniff him by his face
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,281 Posts
This is pretty normal for a dog with a behaviour problem, I would say. The sign you missed that cued the fight was the stiffened posture and lack of motion.

This is also a big reason why introducing dogs on neutral ground is important, and using boundaries and looking at what they say BEFORE they interact is important. I also recommend a dog trainer or behaviourist to asses the dog with another dog safely, so you can see if this is a bigger problem (general fear of dogs or just not wanting them in his home? Something else leading to this?). Because this is a pretty bad bite you also want to be careful with management-lots of gates and crates and being out of sight if another dog DOES need to come over ever in the future. Safety first.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
Well, thankfully they retired that dog. Certainly not a dog I would want in my breeding program...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
911 Posts
Terriers can be dog aggressive. I think you introduced the dogs too quickly. I'd have let the new dog settle in for a few months before bringing my dog over. And like the other said, introduce them on neutral ground. When I brought my (giant) puppy to meet my mom's Scottish Terrier he went after her. He is dog aggressive. We then took them out on a walk down the street and I was amazed, but they just got along after a half a block. After that they played the whole time I was there. Now I don't expect that out of two older dogs. But you will probably need to take it slow and they may never get along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
Don't let dogs greet face to face... it causes too much tension and can be taken as a threat. Look out for stiff body language, a high tail, hackles up, leaning forward, or staring at the other dog when they are greeting each other- these indicate that the dogs aren't comfortable with each other and might start a fight. Don't let them be too "pushy" with sniffing. If one dog is fixating on aniffing the other whether it's the face or the butt, move them away. These are just tips for greeting in general, I'm not saying you should reintroduce the dogs. You could try bringing them on leashed walks together so they can still spend time together without having to directly interact.

Dog greetings: What's really going on - Dogtime
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I'd agree it went too fast. It sounds like your friends dog had just had a sniff but not yet accepted your dog so when he took a step forward it was perceived as a challenge. Once you put your hands there to separate them you were also a stranger challenging them. Introductions need to be done slowly and once your friends dog is satisfied he/she will walk away and that is the cue to enter. At least that is what I have found in my experience.

Having them on leash inside may be tricky though as it will put both dogs more on edge and they will feed of the peoples nervousness that there will be a problem. If you do then you both need to be very calm and relaxed and trust that things will go well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
Yep, terriers can be DA. The face to face greeting was also a mistake. If the owner of the Border terrier wants help, advise them to find a trainer who does not use punishment. Punishing aggression has been shown to increase rather than decrease aggressive behavior.

This forum has a section on how to find the right trainer. Look in the behavior and training stickies.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top