Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Everyone,

I was walking my dog in the neighborhood today and we were working on our desensitization exercises with other dogs we saw on the walk. (My dog is/almost not reactive anymore).

There's a dog we've seen twice now and the dog is really worrying me. Every time we see him, the dog stares, frozen, tense, scary eyes, tight mouth, tries to lunge forward, growls. Today the owner tried let the dog approach us. I had to firmly tell her to get away from us and cross back on the other side of the street where she came from. While the dog was approaching us, he was on the end of the leash, crouching, and starting to show his teeth.

I moved myself and my own dog away. This owner was completely oblivious to the dogs behavior. She kept talking to her dog, "Oh, look that dog is being trained, lets go meet them". She wanted to have the dogs greet each other. When I told her to move away, she even said to me, "Oh you're dog isn't friendly?". My dog was happily doing her eye contact and "find it" exercises to get away.

:eek::eek::eek::eek:

I fear that some day, this owner is going to accidentally drop the leash or she will loose control of the dog, and an attack will happen to either myself or my dog. When the dog was a puppy, we even tried to give her some advice for walking nicely on a leash, but the owner just complained about the dog and ignored our advice.

I feel like I should do something. But I don't know what. I really want to refer her to the trainer I used for my dog. She's a CPDT-KA. But no way would I ever get near her dog on a walk.

Any suggestions for these situations?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
When I'm out with my dogs I can see other dogs coming from pretty far away. For one owner that has two dogs, one which pulls on his leash, growls, and is obviously hankering for a brawl, I simply avoid the issue, whenever I see them I go down another street.
Yes, no one should have to do that, but it's a small price to pay for the safety of myself and my dogs. I'd do the same (and I have) if I spot a person who for some reason raises a red flag with me, I just go a different direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
When I know there's a potentially dangerous dog in the area, I've started carrying citronella, and when we used to go to the dog park I'd carry an air horn. Typically if other people's dogs are involved I'd go for the air horn because people would assume it's pepper spray or mace.

Otherwise maybe just tell the other owner that your dog is not comfortable around other dogs. And sometimes you can say things like "this body posture means ---". It's really hard to explain things like this without people thinking you're saying they have a mean, nasty dog. But just be careful.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kelly528

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@traciek88 Is citronella spray something you could use from a short or long distance? Is it something you'd have to get directly into the dogs face to be effective or would a panicked general direction be effective enough? Is it something that would deter a dog in full attack mode? Sorry, I'm full of questions! I'm thinking about making it a staple in my dog walking pouch. I live on a dead end street, so I have to pass by this dogs house every time I go out walking. I thought about the air horn, but my ears are so sensitive, it makes them ring for days whenever I hear one close by.

Looks like I will just have to turn direction when I see them. I hoped this morning the dog wouldn't be so bad as I thought, but it turned into the first time seeing a dog showing its teeth to me. Scary. Kind of scary what this dog might do, especially because the owner was so oblivious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
Well not from a really long distance but maybe 3 feet or so. The sound/scent of it can stop plenty of dogs from coming close. It doesn't always have to be sprayed directly in the face to stop them. And full on attack mode? Eh, well a lot of these questions depend on the dog. If it's a dog that's drivey and going towards your dog, then I think it could stop them. If it's an extremely dangerous dog that wants nothing more than to tear into another dog...probably not. However most dogs aren't that serious about it. If you're worried about the long/short distance maybe go with the airhorn instead, which is quite loud and can make a dog stop. They can hurt your ears too but you likely won't have to use it much. And you can always throw treats to the other dog to stop him and get away. It's up to you. And if you seriously feel threatened like you and your dog are in danger, you do need to talk to your neighbor. If they do not respond or respond very negatively and you still feel like you're in danger, you need to call animal control/the police.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MollyDoggy

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
I sympathize, it sounds like a very annoying situation with a clueless owner. It's happened a handful of times to me - another owner and their dog who I think is just going to pass by - suddenly stop and allow their dog to be face to face with mine (without asking first), when I can tell their dog is clearly reactive. Thankfully, it didn't end up in more than a snap to the face.

My advice is when you see this owner next time and she is trying to approach you, use physical language. People often respond to that more quickly than words. Hold up your hand in a stop signal. You could say her dog's body language shows it does not want to meet other dogs. You could also say something about your dog having ringworm, so it needs to stay away from other dogs.

When your dog is not with you, and you see her, only then would I feel safe enough to approach her and then maybe I'd bring up training in a nice way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
Seconding the citronella spray. It's totally harmless (and its saved my clients furry bums on every occasion that I've had to use it) BUT people see a tiny canister that looks like pepper spray or bear mace and all of a sudden they take you a LOT more seriously.

Also if you don't care what people think about your dog, just tell her that your dog is aggressive. Nothing says 'back off' faster than "S/he bites!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The neighbors around here talk and talk if there's an aggressive dog around here, plus I'm actually studying to be a dog trainer now. I'd be kind of shy to tell people my dog is aggressive just to avoid her. Especially when I just worked so hard with her to correct her reactivity issues for months. The medical ringworm excuse sounds good though, or any other medical problem. I like that.

Is all citronella spray the same or is there a particular one you'd recommend? I want to take up the suggestions on that.

I was thinking if I ever saw her again without my dog, i could ask her if she was working with a trainer to work on the issue and ask her if she would like me to recommend her to one. Trying to think of a way to do it, where she would accept it and not push me away. This lady is about 50 years old and I sense she wouldn't be too open to accepting advice from a 20 something XD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Trying to think of a way to do it, where she would accept it and not push me away.
One way is to talk about someone else, not her and not you.

You could talk about an (imaginary) friend that had some trouble with her dog, and she came to you for advice, and you recommended that she talk to this trainer you know. (A good move ahead of time would be to get a couple of business cards from your trainer).
What might be good, at the same time, is to talk to your trainer, make sure she has business cards, and recommend that she get a website or at least a FB page representing her business. That way, people including this lady, could go read about the business and in their own environment be able to read about techniques, costs, time frames, and all of the other FAQ that someone considering training might ask.

This might seem like a lot of effort, but here are the plusses:

1)If the lady opts for training, your walks will be less anxious
2) If the trainer you know loves the business card and website idea (if she doesn't have them now) she might ask you on as an assistant, and that would be fabulous for your career.
3) You will know, inside, where it counts, that you've done something good for your dog and hers. It might, might not work out the way you want, but you would have given it your personal best.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top