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Ok so I have a 9-week-old male bernese mountain dog puppy. He has been showing some severe signs of aggression. I’ve had many big dogs all my life and have raised 4 puppies (3 goldens and 1 chow mutt). He was the largest in his litter by over 3 pounds. I believe that he is used to being the big dog and that is where some of the problems are coming from. He is biting nonstop (which is normal for a teething puppy) but he takes it a step farther. When he bites too hard I’ll go limp and yelp or yell no in his face but he is unfazed by it and usually starts getting worse. He does a ripping action and starts deep growling and barking longing towards the thought or face. Once he starts he doesn’t stop. He bosses around my pansy 2 and 5-year-old goldens. He will tare at their face bark and steal their toys or bones. They are extremely well behaved and just sit back and watch him confused looking (wish they would growl and put him in his place a little) I’ve been working on a lot of the basics of what you should do but nothing is seeming to work. He is going on 3 walks a day and has long indoor play sessions, when he gets too much I stand up and walk away, I’ve tried the yelping and yelling to try to shock him to stop, I have distraction toys, I’ve been working on commands such as drop it hoping to use it when he starts biting(he has sit down and has been doing well with come and his name), I feed the other dogs before him to show him is pack roll and have him sit and get calm before he receive food. He is going to be a very large dog and I’m worried if I don’t get these behaviors under control before he grows that he could become a legitimate threat. He has drawn blood on multiple occasions already. I’m just not sure how to deal with it and everything I have read on the internet is only giving me the solutions I already know. Which is lots of exercise, positive reinforcements for good behaviors, barking back at him when he bites too hard, etc. I’ve been also working with his food (pulling it away, petting him, sticking my hand in there while he eats) and he is not food aggressive at all. he just isn’t a fan of being told no.I’ve been looking up a lot of different methods to work with this and it’s all been stuff I already knew and have been doing. I’ve contacted the breeder to find out if he had any of these behaviors before we got him. if anyone knows what I could do or what might be a possibility to the cause it would be a lot of help getting new prospective.
 

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Welcome and congrats on your new addition - he sounds like a handful.

First, I'd forget about working on where he is in the pack; it's simply unnecessary. Second, if you're worried about resource guarding, here's some good information: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention and http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/resource-guarding-causes-prevention-modification-7511/. Your approach of taking his food away, pestering him, and sticking your hand in his dish is likely to create more problems than it prevents.

If you want to establish routine and boundaries, you might take a look at Sophia Yin's Learn to Earn (https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/the-learn-to-earn-program/) or Grisha Stewart's Say Please (Say Please Protocol (or “Using Real Life Rewards”) | Grisha Stewart) programs. Also, you might find this interesting: https://wildewmn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/should-you-always-eat-before-your-dog/

Finally, with his nipping, it sounds like normal puppy over arousal and biting. You might be doing all the right things (withdrawing attention, redirecting onto a toy, interrupting), but it's going to take time - much longer than a week or two (assuming you got him at eight weeks). Puppies explore the world with their mouths, so it takes much longer to inhibit those instincts than it does to teach sit or down. Another thing, it sounds as though you've been trying multiple approaches - try sticking with one thing (e.g., say "ouch" and step over a baby gate out of reach) for a week and see what happens. Here's a sticky with info: http://www.dogforum.com/puppy-help/biting-mouthing-nipping-303634/

A few other thoughts:
- Three walks and long play sessions may be too much for him and could be contributing to the biting and growling. When puppies (like kids) are over tired they misbehave: kids throw tantrums, puppies bite, lunge, and growl (and get zoomies). Also, be mindful of forcing exercise on a young large breed pup.

- I'd strongly recommend enrolling in a rewards-based puppy class and basic manners class. You'll get great hands-on (and eyes-on) assistance to set both of you up for success. Here's a thread on finding a trainer: http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/finding-trainer-behavior-consultant-behaviorist-113946/

Good luck and let us know how things are going for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the input. The biting and nipping is not really the problem. I expect that. It’s the escalation that has me a bit concerned. He doesn’t really have a stop. He just ramps up and gets more and more aggressive with it. he starts with playful body language and ends with a stiff straight for you body language. Yes, you are very right about finding a single method and sticking. I’m just working on figuring out what he responds to and sticking with that. The walking away and a snap no seems the best so far and I’ve been continuing to do it. all these links look really helpful thank you for them :). he started off with one walk in the morning and one at night due to not wanting to push him at a young age (when I say walk I mean about the size of a cul de sac) but when he was being very hyper and going after people in the middle of the day we ended up adding the one more hoping to relive any built-up tension. I do understand that thought prosses though and it is something to think about. I’ve started to look up a couple of local behavioral experts. I’ve never had to use one before and have had very good well behaved sweat dogs. Since I am new to the idea (not against it at all. every dog is a bit different and responds to things differently) would you recommend finding a private facility or are the ones in Petco and PetSmart adequate? To me the people working there don’t always know what they are doing. It’s more of a side job then a well-trained and facility so I’m unaware of how good their staff for that may be. Thank you. I all of these different perspectives our very helpful
 

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Glad to help. PetSmart and PetCo can be hit or miss: the trainers can be great or they can be horrible. Since you have some concerns, I'd suggest finding a class through a private facility (you might google "rewards-based or positive reinforcement-based dog trainer [your area]) or consult the directory from the professional organizations included in the link in my previous post.
 

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One little note I want to say before suggestions is to not yell in your dogs face, as this will do nothing but further frustrate or excite him, and I wouldn't be surprised if he jumped and bit at your face while you were yelling in his face. He's already very stimulated so you need to be as calm as possible. (It's hard with puppies, I know!!)

I would suggest practicing impulse control! It sounds like he has a really hard time with impulses like stealing food, biting hands, biting clothes, etc. Impulse control exercises can be really helpful for that.

It's difficult to explain over text, but here's a good video!

 
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