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Hello, I have an approximately 2 year old male Lhasa apso. He weighs about 20 pounds, and is not neutered. I was given him about a month ago by someone who could no longer care for him properly. At first he was perfectly friendly, if a bit shy. But recently he has become aggressive. He bit my sister when she came over, and then he started claiming certain areas of the house as his (primarily under my desk). When I tried to make him move, he bit me. Last night he refused to go to bed in his normal spot, and bit me when I got near him. And I don't mean a little warning bite, I mean he charged me in a frenzy. I am afraid that he will try to bite my other dog, a Lhasa apso/ Shih tzu mix. As of now he leaves my other dog alone, but he is only get more aggressive.
 

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If he's biting people, you need a behaviorist. got to iaabc.org. Only use a positive behaviorist. If they use collars or talk about dominance, walk away.

What he's doing is called resource guarding. It is fixable, but you need a pro to help you with it.
 

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Sounds like you need one-on-one professional help asap. Please call someone (suggest working top down from the list in your search): http://www.dogforum.com/training-be...ainer-behavior-consultant-behaviorist-113946/

In the meantime, review this on resource guarding and body language: http://www.dogforum.com/training-be...guarding-causes-prevention-modification-7511/ and http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/calming-signals-10084/

Shy dogs sometimes escalate into what we view as "aggression" because their warnings that they are uncomfortable are ignored or punished. No more approaching him, no more "making him move;" give him some space. Keep him separated from guests and children. If you walk by, toss him a treat so he starts to associate you with good things.

If you absolutely must move him, have him drag a leash when you are home so that you can guide him without getting in his space. Add a treat in the equation to lure him off and pay him off with more once you get him to his spot.

As far as your other dog, if you're worried about inter-dog aggression, just separate them until you get an eval from a behavior consultant. Baby gates, ex-pens, crates, separate rooms--all good, safe options.
 
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