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Hi everyone, at long last we think it is the right time in our lives to own a dog, having waited 13 years (!) our youngest is now about to turn 7 and we are ready. I could really do with some advice on the breed choice that I am looking for, mainly because although my husband is with me on this, but we realise it is a big decision and he would like reassurance.

Our situation - based in UK, three kids (12, 10, 7), large house and garden in the country, 3 old cats. I work part time, which means I have two long days at work (8 - 4:30) and on those days I will get someone to come walk the dog, or/and I have a dog run in the garden, and my preference (if people think possible) to have a dog that could go in the run during that time (not as their exercise).

My requirements: I don't like little dogs, I prefer short coat (but not a deal breaker), I run so I would like quite an active dog, and the big one for me, I want a dog that would put people off (I would like my kids to walk the dog and want a dog that at least looks off putting even if it is as soft as butter).

All my life I wanted a weimaraner, but my husband has read they can be destructive and have high separation anxiety, and I am willing to compromise on the breed. I like the look of the german short haired pointer, or possibly along those pointer lines, but my husband is scared by the amount of exercise some sites say they need. I do like that lean athletic look though.

I have waited so long to have a dog, and we want to make sure that this is the right breed for us all, so any advice would be gratefully received.

thanks:eek:
 

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Different dogs have different personalities. I also find that mental exercise is way more important than physical. I mean you can run a dog for hours and all you'll get is a really in shape dog, if you play mind games like find it or feed through food puzzle toys plus exercise you'll get an exhausted dog, which equals a good dog.

I would start with the dogs you like and then contact breeders to see if you are a fit for them.
 

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Why not a retired Greyhound or even a puppy. Lean look, less exercise needed (But would most likely be a good running partner). Any hunting dog is going to require A LOT of exercise.
 
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I feel like a pit or bully breed would suit you well, too. You would want to ensure its socialized to dogs in particular-a rescue might be easiest. They have varying energy levels so some training required but do-able for a family.

If you want a dog that will put people off, find a black dog. Any black dog. It's amazing the difference. I'm 5'2'' and people would cross the street just to get away from me and my super-happy dog. It's annoying at times, but if we walk late at night it's great....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, yes I am tempted to look at a weimaraner. Realistically how many dogs will I have in this lifetime - which ever dog we get, our life will change dramatically.

I am not convinced that a grey hound would have the fear factor/make a stranger think twice about approaching. To me they look far too gentle. On the other hand unluckily here in the uk the pit or bully breed has very bad press. There have unluckily been a few terrible incidents where people/babies have been killed, and so I don't think my husband would want that breed. I understand that many are probably absolutely lovely, but I need my husband fully onboard.
Many thanks
 

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Weimaraners don't really have that fear factor either. I love the breed but i think that characteristic is going to be hardest to fit when put with the others.
 

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I second the idea that you should get a rescue adult, pups can't run right away because their joints aren't fully developed and also adults are more set in their temperament so you can find an individual that is already good with kids.

I also second getting a black dog if you want protection.
Manna my Newfie makes almost everyone cross the street.
A newfoundland dog who thinks people are more rewarding than steak and would just love to love on everyone, but she's big and black and that will scare most people.
That being said Newfies need a lot of grooming so I wouldn't suggest one for your situation.

Maybe an older black lab or lab mix?
 

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I wouldn't get a Weimeraner if i were you.
these dogs belong in hunter's hands, they're not just family dogs.

they can be awesome family dogs but even then...I've seen a lot of Weimis losing their home when they mature, because people bought them because of their looks, forgetting they get a independent, fast thinking allround hunting dog with a (purposefully) inbred tendency for Wildschärfe (means dog is meant to make relatively fast the decision to bite a wild animal) and Mannschärfe (means the same thing...just with humans) and protection drive towards his handler and his/her things.
those are awesome dogs and they can work with pet and small children...but i wouldn't see this as the ideal dog breed in a family home with only a daily walk.
Especially not when you don't have a bit of experience dealing with protection drive and preydrive (there is also the possibility that the dog will see cats and small children as prey) in dogs.

The Deutsch Kurzhaar is a bit less intense bit it is also a hunting dog that is bred to have preydrive.
Both, Weimi and DKH, need a lot (a looot) of mental and physical exercise and an outlet for their preydrive because otherwise they'll find ways to entertain themself alone. *shrug*
Both are also not the easiest to train.

perhaps less specialised dogs or companion dogs would be a better for a family with children and prey animals (cats).
Generally stop looking for a dogs appearance and start looking for a breed/mix that fits your lifestyle.
if you like lean, muscular dogs and you're willing to give the dog enough exercise perhaps a German Pinscher or a Dalmatian could fit you.
I also would completely rule out retrievers and Poodles. they're also very energetic, but they're often a bit easier to train.
A black Lab can look pretty intimidating.
And of course Schäfis. They can basically be anything you want, when you're willing to exercise and train them.

please make sure to not let small children walk a bigger dog. even the best-trained dog would get startled and try to run away and pull your child accross the street. this can be very dangerous.
don't let kids that are not older teenager yet and know how to handle every situation that could occur (dog pulling or running away, dogfights, preyydrive with dog chasing or even killing an animal, the dog getting injured, keeping people away from the dog, etc. ) walk the dog alone.
 
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I wouldn't get a Weimeraner if i were you.
these dogs belong in hunter's hands, they're not just family dogs.

they can be awesome family dogs but even then...I've seen a lot of Weimis losing their home when they mature, because people bought them because of their looks, forgetting they get a independent, fast thinking allround hunting dog with a (purposefully) inbred tendency for Wildschärfe (means dog is meant to make relatively fast the decision to bite a wild animal) and Mannschärfe (means the same thing...just with humans) and protection drive towards his handler and his/her things.
those are awesome dogs and they can work with pet and small children...but i wouldn't see this as the ideal dog breed in a family home with only a daily walk.
Especially not when you don't have a bit of experience dealing with protection drive and preydrive (there is also the possibility that the dog will see cats and small children as prey) in dogs.

The Deutsch Kurzhaar is a bit less intense bit it is also a hunting dog that is bred to have preydrive.
Both, Weimi and DKH, need a lot (a looot) of mental and physical exercise and an outlet for their preydrive because otherwise they'll find ways to entertain themself alone. *shrug*
Both are also not the easiest to train.

perhaps less specialised dogs or companion dogs would be a better for a family with children and prey animals (cats).
Generally stop looking for a dogs appearance and start looking for a breed/mix that fits your lifestyle.
if you like lean, muscular dogs and you're willing to give the dog enough exercise perhaps a German Pinscher or a Dalmatian could fit you.
I also would completely rule out retrievers and Poodles. they're also very energetic, but they're often a bit easier to train.
A black Lab can look pretty intimidating.
And of course Schäfis. They can basically be anything you want, when you're willing to exercise and train them.

please make sure to not let small children walk a bigger dog. even the best-trained dog would get startled and try to run away and pull your child accross the street. this can be very dangerous.
don't let kids that are not older teenager yet and know how to handle every situation that could occur (dog pulling or running away, dogfights, preyydrive with dog chasing or even killing an animal, the dog getting injured, keeping people away from the dog, etc. ) walk the dog alone.
Such a good explanation on Weimeraners. I love hunting dogs, I will always own one but they require a JOB if they aren't being used for hunting. Even then many are just "too much dog" when not being used for hunting for many families.
 

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@TruckersMom:
Weimaraner are truely awesome dogs, but....just a few weeks ago i saw a weimaraner (again) on ebay smalladds.
Weimaraner, 11 months, has to be given away because of a biting incident involving a human.
this is probably not an aggressive dog. This is probably an untrained dog with an owner that didn'T expect their tog to grow up into a serious protector thinking pretty independently.
I've met Weimis that didn't let anyone come closer than 3 meters to their family.
this can also happen with a lot of other dogs with protection drive... but it is something that makes them not the easiest beginner dogs.

Weimaraner are not per se aggessive but for a long time this breed was selected not only on their prey drive and working abilities as a hunting dog, but also on protection drive to protect the hunter and the prey against poachers.
sometimes the love for a dog breed should mean that you know yourself and the breed and don't set the dog up for failures.
 
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Another vote here for any kind of black dog. My seriously calm, mellow, senior dog is black and people are intimidated by her every day for no reason. A rottweiler or german shepherd could be a good option, some people are still intimidated by them but they tend to be big babies(as long as theyre trained right and get good amounts of mental and physical exercise) but I'd make sure to get their joints checked regularly if running with them as they're both known to have some issues.
 

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Why don't you go to Crufts (10 - 13 March at the NEC Birmingham) and talk to people with breeds you like on the Discover Dogs stands? They should be able to tell you more about the personalities and traits of UK bred dogs.
 

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Hi everyone, at long last we think it is the right time in our lives to own a dog, having waited 13 years (!) our youngest is now about to turn 7 and we are ready. I could really do with some advice on the breed choice that I am looking for, mainly because although my husband is with me on this, but we realise it is a big decision and he would like reassurance.

Our situation - based in UK, three kids (12, 10, 7), large house and garden in the country, 3 old cats. I work part time, which means I have two long days at work (8 - 4:30) and on those days I will get someone to come walk the dog, or/and I have a dog run in the garden, and my preference (if people think possible) to have a dog that could go in the run during that time (not as their exercise).

My requirements: I don't like little dogs, I prefer short coat (but not a deal breaker), I run so I would like quite an active dog, and the big one for me, I want a dog that would put people off (I would like my kids to walk the dog and want a dog that at least looks off putting even if it is as soft as butter).

All my life I wanted a weimaraner, but my husband has read they can be destructive and have high separation anxiety, and I am willing to compromise on the breed. I like the look of the german short haired pointer, or possibly along those pointer lines, but my husband is scared by the amount of exercise some sites say they need. I do like that lean athletic look though.

I have waited so long to have a dog, and we want to make sure that this is the right breed for us all, so any advice would be gratefully received.

thanks:eek:
A dobermann?
 

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All my life I wanted a weimaraner, but my husband has read they can be destructive and have high separation anxiety, and I am willing to compromise on the breed. I like the look of the german short haired pointer, or possibly along those pointer lines, but my husband is scared by the amount of exercise some sites say they need. I do like that lean athletic look though.
Let's put things in perspective. Competitive sled dogs run the equivalent of FIVE MARATHONS in a day...and then in many cases, do it again the next day. You know what breed of dog is mixed in with sled dogs to give them even more endurance, speed, and energy? Pointer.

Granted, of the various pointer breeds, there are some dogs bred more to be pets or show dogs than hunters, and these tend to not be quite as energetic and the field lines...but make no mistake, pointers as a group require a TON of exercise.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't get one, it just means you must plan accordingly. For instance, would you be willing to give up running and take up biking instead? A human on two legs is going to have a hard time giving a pointer a good workout. On a bike, different story.

One of the reasons people find their Weimaraners and other similar breeds so destructive is they are failing to give the dog the workout they really need.

A tired dog is a good dog.
 

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Let's put things in perspective. Competitive sled dogs run the equivalent of FIVE MARATHONS in a day...and then in many cases, do it again the next day. You know what breed of dog is mixed in with sled dogs to give them even more endurance, speed, and energy? Pointer.

Granted, of the various pointer breeds, there are some dogs bred more to be pets or show dogs than hunters, and these tend to not be quite as energetic and the field lines...but make no mistake, pointers as a group require a TON of exercise.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't get one, it just means you must plan accordingly. For instance, would you be willing to give up running and take up biking instead? A human on two legs is going to have a hard time giving a pointer a good workout. On a bike, different story.

One of the reasons people find their Weimaraners and other similar breeds so destructive is they are failing to give the dog the workout they really need.

A tired dog is a good dog.
I love this! It pretty much made my day. :thumbsup:
 

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i wanted to add, that what I wrote is from a German perspective and mostly about German lines, which are only working lines bred by hunters for the purpose of hunting. These are pretty intense working dogs.

However I read that in America they breed them more family compartible (i.e. they still will have prey drive and needs tons of exercise, but the protection drive is not as severe ) and some breeders in other european countries are breeding dual pupose dogs by crossing in American Line dogs.
 
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