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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hello :)
I would like some advice and opinions on owning a dog whilst working.
I am a freelance illustrator but work part time 10-4, each day of the week. (weekends off)

Luckily I work five minutes from home so I will easily be able to make it home on my hour lunch break. I grew up with labradors but my mum worked from home so they were rarely left alone day to day. I live an active lifestyle and would be commitment to walking my dog morning and evening, however, I still have reservations, especially if I get a puppy.

Thoughts on working these hours and juggling a young happy dog? I would love to hear from anyone in a similar boat and how you've been able to give your dog enough time and attention despite it.

As I mentioned Ive grown up around labradors and adore them but am open to other breed advice supposing they tolerate being left alone any better? If thats even a thing! (doubt).

My main priority is obviously that dog is happy and healthy above all else.

Thankyou
 

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Well I'm awake for about 15 hours a day and work part time as well, so that means I'm working anywhere from 3-6 hours which gives me 9-12 hours with my dog - which is plenty of time for exercise! He's an Aussie though and needs a lot of it (not 9 hours mind you, but about 2-4 is what he gets. Keeping in mind that's not necessary and I spend a lot of time with him, however Aussies do need a bit more exercise than your average dog)

Out of curiosity what kind of puppies are you looking at? Shelter mixes or a purebred from a breeder? What breed?

If you want a puppy then crate training will help a lot, and inevitably someone will have to drop by within the 6 hours you're working to let the puppy out a few times with some play time. So if you know anyone start calling! Make sure it's someone who you can rely on.

Also ! Want to add no puppy can be left alone for that amount of time, labs included.
 

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As long as you can devote enough exercise, mental stimulation, attention, etc, before and after you come home from work, a dog can be perfectly happy with a working owner. It can be done, just need to make sure you provide enough when you're home. I've raised multiple puppies (and fosters) just fine while working full time. Thy are happy, well-rounded (and exercised) dogs that are just fine being left home alone while i'm at work. They sleep most of the day anyways or play with eachother.
 

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As long as you can devote enough exercise, mental stimulation, attention, etc, before and after you come home from work, a dog can be perfectly happy with a working owner. It can be done, just need to make sure you provide enough when you're home. I've raised multiple puppies (and fosters) just fine while working full time. Thy are happy, well-rounded (and exercised) dogs that are just fine being left home alone while i'm at work. They sleep most of the day anyways or play with eachother.
I agree, although will add it's a tad harder to do with a puppy as puppies have the peeing and leaving cute brown gifts on the floor.

You will likely need to have someone come let the puppy put to relieve themselves unless you're ok with pad training until you have time to properly train
 

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I agree, although will add it's a tad harder to do with a puppy as puppies have the peeing and leaving cute brown gifts on the floor.

You will likely need to have someone come let the puppy put to relieve themselves unless you're ok with pad training until you have time to properly train
You're right, it was a bit harder with puppies. I have been extremely lucky that all pups that I've had here (excluding one) have been phenomenal at housetraining and being able to hold it relatively quick while I was at work and at night. Knock on wood I didn't jinx the future by saying this, lol. I don't have the luxury of being able to have someone come and let them out while i'm not home. Even if I wanted to hire a dog walker, one of my current dogs and perhaps my newest addition wouldn't let someone in without me here. One dog that passed away not too long ago wouldn't let someone in without me here either. Those that can, I find to be lucky and also recommend it of possible. I know I would if I could, but completely doable if the work is put into it.
 

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I agree, although will add it's a tad harder to do with a puppy as puppies have the peeing and leaving cute brown gifts on the floor.

You will likely need to have someone come let the puppy put to relieve themselves unless you're ok with pad training until you have time to properly train
I would be slightly cautious with the pad training. My cousins got a puppy a year ago and never really trained her to go outside because there was a few things they had to do to their yard to puppy proof it and because it was cold and muddy. They used the pads, and when it was time for her to start to learn to go outside, she didn't really listen because she was use to the convenience of the pad.

I know that not all works allow this, but is it possible for you to bring your dog to work? I don't know if you have the room but if you do, it would be a great way to start socializing your dog, and it would also be easier to take the puppy on very quick potty breaks. Again, I know the chances of this actually being possible is small but I thought I would just grow this suggestion out.
 

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I would be slightly cautious with the pad training. My cousins got a puppy a year ago and never really trained her to go outside because there was a few things they had to do to their yard to puppy proof it and because it was cold and muddy. They used the pads, and when it was time for her to start to learn to go outside, she didn't really listen because she was use to the convenience of the pad.

I know that not all works allow this, but is it possible for you to bring your dog to work? I don't know if you have the room but if you do, it would be a great way to start socializing your dog, and it would also be easier to take the puppy on very quick potty breaks. Again, I know the chances of this actually being possible is small but I thought I would just grow this suggestion out.
There are many young dogs that aren't potty trained in shelters that were allowed to pee inside that do perfectly fine with consistent training. If someone is consistent and persistent I don't see any reason any dog that isn't extremely old or sick shouldn't be able to learn how to go outside. Many breeders pad train puppies before they go home and I've never heard of it being a lifetime issue.

The list of workplaces that allow dogs is so short that I feel that's an unlikely option. Not to mention I would never bring an untrained dog to a workplace, especially a young untrained puppy who may pee and poop all over the place. Unless OP happens to work outside in a job like tagging or taking notes and collecting information on wildlife or something then I feel it's unlikely this is a realistic option.
 

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I used to work full time along with my husband and owned two dogs together, german shepherds both. I had a tiny fenced yard that was useless for exercise (since taken it down). We were away 9 hours per weekday, but home like clockwork (excepting the rarest of snowstorm/traffic jam).
One dog, dearest Dynamo, was a high drive dog.
There were all fine, really really super fine. For Dynamo, from 6months (when we got her) to her 1st yr, she went to doggy daycare one time per week, other than that, they were home 9 hours per weekday.
This would be the weekday schedule 52 weeks of the year, any (and I do mean any) weather.
15 minute walk before leaving for work.
Home in crate or rec room (separated from the cats, I can't remember when she graduated from crate to rec room).
1 hour walk (for her lively young years), off leash in the woods (once reliably trained), with frisbee and tug (as much as she wanted) and fun mini-training sessions, leg weaves, wobble board (actually a 'found' object in the woods), swimming, more frisbee, you get the picture.
Weekly dog classes, from basic manners to rally-o to agility. (this business was in her young years)
Quick training sessions indoors and/or playtime (yes, I do allow gsd's to jump and whirl indoors).
Weekends, same, but longer walks.
Absolutely NO weather would keep us indoors, rain, shine, freezing cold, blowing snow, etc.
I'm outlining the schedule because there is a vast difference between leaving a dog home alone for hours and then coming home and relaxing, vs coming home and playing with and walking and training your dog. But yes, lots of dogs are fine home alone, all depends on the dog and schedule. I suspect strict predicatable schedules would be easier than something that was off and on again.
 
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