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Hello,
I'm fostering a dog from a shelter I volunteer at. The dog is a female Maltese/terrier mix weighing approximately 14-17 pounds. She's adult, abiut 3-4 years, with a largely unknown history; she came in as a to the shelter as a stray.
She's been at the shelter I volunteer with(it's a no-kill rescue, no need to worry!), for about 3 months.

Now some of you might be wondering from the title why I'm seeking advice on grooming her. Honestly I'd prefer not to, but in this situation it isn't an option. She's entirely healthy, no illnesses or such, but she has one issue;

She has a large amount of fecal matter covering her backend and vaginal opening. (I mean entirely, the amount of **** on this dog would shock a dung beetle.) It's causing a rash to develop along her anus, and vaginal opening, it's not yet an infection or serious, a vets checked for that through a fecal sample, but the fecal matter has been gradually worsening the rash for nearly a month now. (I know it sounds horrible, I cringe every time I see her butt)

Now, this could have been easily allieviated through a grooming and application of bacterial ointment/oral pill as she no longer has diahrea. We've tried everything to remove it, gloves, towels, water hoses, warm water pools etc. Here's where comes the real problem.


She's aggressive, I mean extremely aggressive. Any type of contact, no matter how minimal, no matter how slow, no matter the situation, no matter how many hot dogs/pieces of bacon any contact, even a finger brushing her fur warrants a bite. Not a snip or nip, a bite. She will bite and hold on for up to a minute applying consistent pressure with her mouth to the "attacker". She has a large muzzle, with a overbite and a fairly large jaw for her size. And she's sent people to the hospital with stitches, no joke. I've been bitten countless times her caretaker has been bitten, other dogs have been bitten, everyone is terrified of her. Our main shelter caretaker has been slowly working with her for nearly 4 months, every day she's been staying at his house, slowing working with her and he risks a visit to the hospital if he touches her anywhere except on top of her head he risks a finger.


We've taken her to vets, they can't do anything, not unless it starts to drastically affect her health. It irritates her, she's constantly dragging along the ground, gnawing at it, but it's not serious enough. Is there any procedure a vet could do to deal with this type of issue? We would like to take her to a larger vet office but do not want to just walk in without any plan. Most vets will not put a dog under anesthesia for grooming so we are looking for a procedure to present them with as an option to circumvent any injuries to staff, while addiontally dealing with the fecal matter rash.

I'm posting this here to seek, request and beg for any advice, information, relating to assisting us in helping this poor girl get rid of her *ahem* ****. Is there any way, any procedure, any suggestions anyone on here knows that would allieviate this poor girls discomfort? Any reply is welcome, thank you for reading.
 

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Have your vets give her a sedation while in clinic, and then while she is sleepy, (not completely under, not a full anaesthetic, its like a pre -medication, and the vets will have a reversal for it too) its what we do for aggressive dogs when in need of a groom, especially in these areas.
 

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Ditto. Have a vet Sedate her and get it taken care of. The sooner it's taken care of the better. It's not uncommon for there to be more issues under mating like that than expected...

Also a dog like this is likely to take some serious work... I hope you're in it for the long haul. We're I in your shoes I would be conditioning a basket muzzle as well as working on daily counter conditioning sessions to handling and grooming.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both so much for your advice. When we take her to the new vet I will request what you mentioned. I was told repeatedly that anethetic wasn't an option, and that that was the only thing a vet could offer, but they never mentioned sedation as an option or as you call it the pre-medication. The new vet we will take her to is larger soI hope they will understand.

And yes, kmes (she has a longish coat, which is what combined with the diahrea created a horrible matted mess, she has matting on other areas along he back but no where near as bad as her back) so other issues is exactly what I'm worried about that made it necessary for such extreme measures.

Also, do not worry, I am prepared to and the Rescue's founder is prepared to do everything possible to support her on her road to adoption. Rescue is no-kill, and we never give a dog back to animal controll, ever. She is a unique case; with the complication of health and behavioral problems but never has a dog come to our shelter and left without noticeable improvement and complete health. I've actually grown to care about her, even though I'm utterly terrified of her.

Generally we never muzzle the dogs in our shelter, usually those with aggression we've found alternate methods to work with or found an adopter willing to work with, train, and offer positive reinforcement too. But due to her health complications, (and her recent attack that sent a individual to the hospital) she is not up for adoption. I and the shelters caretaker are planning to work with her aggression before adoption, as it is, I agree, a basket muzzle might be necessary.
We've yet to begin conditioning her and lowering stimuli response since of the BIG issue yet, but I'm very eager to have a vet sedate and take care of everything back there. We have hopes that without the constant painful irritation she will be more responsive to comfort, daily care and handling.


Thank you again so, so much kmes and MrsCunningham, you advice is extremely appreciated. I will update here again (if okay) after vet visit. Thank you again!
 

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Some training videos that might help:

You and staff will likely need to really break it down into baby steps for this dog. Probably starting with counterconditioning just a reach (no actual physical contact at first) or perhaps just conditioning the appearance of grooming tools.
 

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Muzzle training doesn't have to be unpleasant for the dog at all! With aggression cases like this one, safety first. Def watch the second video above if unfamiliar with training a dog to wear a muzzle with positive reinforcement. :)
 

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Yep to even begin to work with her you are going to have to get those mats removed, especially from her rear end. Once she's no longer in pain from the mats and is feeling a heck of a lot better it will be a heck of a lot easier to start counter conditioning her to being groomed.

I echo getting it done under sedation. Have them just shave her down (although I don't normally recommend that for a double coated dog), then once it's done start working with her like in the videos Kmes posted.

If you grow her coat out after it's shaved keeping her in a sanitary clip will prevent the poo mat from reforming. If the rash is not to bad it ought to clear up once the mat is gone and not irritating the area any longer so you may be lucky and just have to keep an eye on the area.
 

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A dog that has sent people to the hospital needs to be evaluated by a professional who has experience working with aggression. May not be a dog the average rescue or foster home is willing or able to deal with.
 

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Given the pets behavior at the vet I work for we would absolutely do anesthesia and shave down. Sedation is not effective for all dogs, especially those with heightened sensitivity to certain areas being touched which in this dogs case seems to be everywhere. If you are able to have a vet do anesthesia I would recommend having the teeth cleaned and do full blood and urine check at the same time.
 
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