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Hello everyone!

I have a 7 1/2 year old Husky. The other day, he saw a cat and darted. He barked at first followed by a screeching puppy yelp (you know that yelp when dogs gets hurt). I ran over to get him and he was walking fine. The next day I noticed he was limping a bit and by that night, the limping got worse. Took him to the vet and she thinks he injured or may have partially torn his knee ligament. She wanted to sedate him to do xrays but prescribed him rimadyl and we have a follow-up on Thursday. She said strict bed rest but that's hard to do with an active dog. I do not allow him to run and I take him for 2 very short walks very slowly. He has trouble climbing on the couch and/or getting in a car. I wanted to ask anyone how do you know if a dog has completely torn their knee ligament and what is the best solution for treatment other than surgery. Would a brace help? Advice is needed, thanks everyone!
 

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I used this http://www.supersnouts.com/jointpower/The vet said it would take about a year to heal on its own. He had torn ligaments in his knee. He had a limp and his gate was bad. In about 6 months there was a huge improvement. The limp was gone and his gate is smooth again. I got it in this form because it cost less and I like to use human supplements because there are guide lines not so much with pet supplements. Swanson Premium New Zealand Green Lipped Mussel, Freeze Dried 500 mg 60 Caps - Swanson Health Products
 

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I agree with Dawn, supplements are going to be your best bet, along with some down time to recuperate from the injury itself. Please keep in mind that not all supplements are going to work for all dogs, so you might be trying out a few of them in your search. And at 7 & 1/2 years of age, your dog is just about of the age to need them anyway.

Because all three of my dogs have varying conditions that require it, I've got them on Platinum Performance complete joint, which goes in their supper in the evenings. This is a top of the line supplement and is priced accordingly, but for us has been worth every penny. They are extremely quick to ship too, so you can get this quickly. I also have them on a morning supplement called Pet Naturals, also an excellent supplement, price per pill (chewables too).

If you don't want to wait (and I highly suggest you don't), you can pick up some glucosamine/chondroitin tablets at Walmart and give them to him, as the human formulation is no different than that for dogs. Get the TRIPLE strength. Just pop them in some cream cheese or something, and let him have them. It'll take a week or so for any noticeable improvement, but these truly will help.

I've also got my youngest on a supplement called microlactin, as she's got a luxating patella, and it has helped her tremendously. This and other things are discussed in a thread I started here. Also suggested for joints is Cetyl-M (the Platinum Performance supplement contains this, but in small a small amount), which is next on the docket if the microlactin doesn't work in the long term.

You cannot go wrong with a good joint supplement(s) in an middle aged/elderly dog, and in a great deal of cases, they spring back miraculously. What's more, is with water-based supplements like these, you can give them in quantity until they work, as it's virtually impossible to overdose; unless of course you're supplying bucket sized or other absurd quantities.
 

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I had a dog years ago who blew out both ACLs. Both times, we were told that it might get better on its own. But in our dog's particular case, he just took to using 3 legs and that made going for walks difficult -- he'd get winded quickly and would just lie down. Since he weighed about 50 lbs, it was HARD to carry him. That sealed the deal for us on surgery for both knees (the ruptures happened a couple years apart). And after both surgeries he healed up beautifully and had full use of his legs again till he passed years later. Just my experience, not a recommendation.
 

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CCL surgery for my husky

Well, after many vet visits, a final diagnosis was made that my 7.5 yr old Sib Husky tore his CCL (not sure if it's partial or complete, vets thinks complete) and now needs surgery. He recommends TPLO because of his size and weight (he's 74 lbs) but that is one COSTLY procedure. Has anyone had any experience getting the traditional CCL surgery on their large dogs? Thanks guys!
 
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